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Excellent System Build guide for Core i7/i5 machines

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  • Build
  • Intel i7
  • Intel i5
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
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December 9, 2009 4:37:52 PM

Dear All,

I stumbled across this one, found to be very helpful to the minute detail. I hope it would be useful to many (new) system builders like me experimenting with Core i5/i7 family.

http://www.corsair.com/systembuild/print.aspx?report_id...

I am asking out of curiosity, why did they decide on 860 instead of choosing 870/750? Even AnandTech and few other reviewers found 860 is better positioned (since it's HT enabled and price) compared to 870/750. What do you guys think?

Thanks,

~akula2

More about : excellent system build guide core machines

December 9, 2009 5:15:09 PM

The i5 750 doesnt have hyperthreading so its inferior on CPU intensive tasks. The 870 is a large price increase for an insubstantial performace increase.
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December 9, 2009 5:31:43 PM

dndhatcher said:
The i5 750 doesnt have hyperthreading so its inferior on CPU intensive tasks. The 870 is a large price increase for an insubstantial performace increase.

I got that point, thanks for replying. Even I observed 860 is not projected like 870 and 750 counterparts, that's why am inquisitive to learn why :)  Price for i5-750 is $190 and for i5-860 is $280 (both TigerDirect). That's $90 difference to me and if multiply it by 21 am going to get a shock :ouch:  Personally, which one do you recommend ignoring the price?

~akula2
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December 9, 2009 5:57:29 PM

Depends on what the computers are for. For most gaming the i5 is as good as any CPU right now. For heavy multi-thread applications the 860 is the way to go. If you just want solid gaming performance then a Phenom II x3 920 AM3 system is the most price effective strong gaming machine.
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December 9, 2009 6:06:57 PM

dndhatcher said:
Depends on what the computers are for. For most gaming the i5 is as good as any CPU right now. For heavy multi-thread applications the 860 is the way to go. If you just want solid performance then a Phenom II x3 AM3 system is the most price effective strong gaming machine.

Actually am phasing out 5 year+ old 875p 20 workstations which are daily used for Drug Design and Modeling and few more apps related to Pharma industry. A chemist today strongly urged me to go for i7 (because of HT) but I said 750 is very good one and it shouldn't matter much to us without HT - I know HT has some 10% more performance over non HT for my requirement (but I intend to save money). So, I need a good graphics card for R&D usages not exactly for gaming (from this perspective too, found i5-750 as a very good choice). What's your suggestion in my scenario?

Thanks,

~akula2
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December 9, 2009 6:14:19 PM

Unless serious CAD is involved, even an Intel Graphics Media Decelerator offers enough graphics power for your application. Use the money saved to go for the hyperthreaded i7.
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December 9, 2009 7:02:36 PM

are you open to overclocking these systems ?

overclocking is not for gaming or benchmarking only . a moderate 3.2 will outperform a 860 and the results will be really visible in cpu-intensive modelling apps compared to say , my own usage , gaming , where its still mostly about my Gpu power .

an i5 with $20 on cooler master hyper tx3 will get u to 3.2 ghz easily and save u 60 dollars .
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December 9, 2009 7:13:34 PM

as jtt said, you don't need a good graphics card for a workstation. I won't go as far as to say get an integrated card, but say a HD 5750 would be fine and still let you game a bit.

Also, look over the software you use carefully, VERY few programs actually utilize 8 threads. While in benchmarking the HT makes a diff, if your software doesn't utilize more 4 threads there's no point.

So yea, basically software hasn't caught up to thread count yet. 99% still only utilizes 2 or 3 cores max.

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December 9, 2009 7:19:24 PM

no , for basic display workstation , i would have suggested integrated but none exist for p55 . if this intel-nvidia war wasnt there , p55 with ion-like gpu motherboards would have been there , better than amd 790gx and still cost effective !
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December 12, 2009 3:11:34 PM

Onus said:
Unless serious CAD is involved, even an Intel Graphics Media Decelerator offers enough graphics power for your application.

Pharma design and modeling applications are more intensive, mostly higher than CAD system requirements. Definitely we need a Graphics card (present PCs are running with 256 MB nVidia cards).

Onus said:
Use the money saved to go for the hyperthreaded i7.

This is where we all are struck, seriously considering 860 but not 870 :??: 
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December 12, 2009 3:15:04 PM

cyberkuberiah said:
are you open to overclocking these systems ?

No, except me NONE would do OC (only Turbo Boost = 3.2 GHz for i5-750).

cyberkuberiah said:
a moderate 3.2 will outperform a 860 and the results will be really visible in cpu-intensive modelling apps

Yep, that's my point too :) 

cyberkuberiah said:
an i5 with $20 on cooler master hyper tx3 will get u to 3.2 ghz easily and save u 60 dollars .

Would surely consider it, thank you so much.

~akula2
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December 22, 2009 1:01:49 PM

banthracis said:
as jtt said, you don't need a good graphics card for a workstation. I won't go as far as to say get an integrated card, but say a HD 5750 would be fine and still let you game a bit.

Also, look over the software you use carefully, VERY few programs actually utilize 8 threads. While in benchmarking the HT makes a diff, if your software doesn't utilize more 4 threads there's no point.

So yea, basically software hasn't caught up to thread count yet. 99% still only utilizes 2 or 3 cores max.


I went for Core i7-860, Gigabyte P55A-UD4P and Sapphire Radeon 5770 (Juniper XT) 1GB GDDR5 as my requirement is not that easy considering running multiple apps and simulations, driving 3 LCDs (Eyefinity support) etc. Thanks for the response.
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