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A lil Help With the Voltages...

I bought a Cooler Master Extreme Power Plus 650W Power Supply (Exact Model is: RP-650-PCAR-E3 : http://www.coolermaster-europe.com/product.php?product_id=5924)


When I run the HWInfo i am geting the below values:


http://www.picscrazy.com/thumb/HWINFO.jpg


Can you please tell me if these voltages are healthy for my system: Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450/4GB RAM/ 400GB Western Digital/250 GB Hitachhi/ASUS VENTO 7700 CASING/1DVDWRITER/6600LE VGA - I KNOW the VGA is pretty OLD but im going to buy a new GTX260 core 216 - So is willl I be ok with these voltages/PSU :)


Heres some extra detail if it helps:

CPUID HWMonitor Report
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Binaries
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

HWMonitor version 1.1.5.0

Monitoring
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mainboard Model P45A01 (0x0000015B - 0x0053B620)

LPCIO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

LPCIO Vendor ITE
LPCIO Model IT8720
LPCIO Vendor ID 0x90
LPCIO Chip ID 0x8720
LPCIO Revision ID 0x2
Config Mode I/O address 0x2E
Config Mode LDN 0x4
Config Mode registers
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
20 87 20 02 10 00 00 FF FF 00 00 00 00 1F 00 00 00
30 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
50 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
60 0A 10 0A 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
70 00 02 00 00 04 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
Register space LPC, base address = 0x0A10


Hardware Monitors
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Hardware monitor ITE IT87
Voltage 0 1.04 Volts [0x41] (CPU VCORE)
Voltage 1 1.87 Volts [0x75] (VIN1)
Voltage 2 2.98 Volts [0xBA] (+3.3V)
Voltage 3 5.05 Volts [0xBC] (+5V)
Voltage 4 13.70 Volts [0xD6] (+12V)
Voltage 5 -4.74 Volts [0x4A] (-12V)
Voltage 6 -4.35 Volts [0x44] (-5V)
Voltage 7 5.08 Volts [0xBD] (+5V VCCH)
Voltage 8 2.66 Volts [0xA6] (VBAT)
Temperature 0 49°C (120°F) [0x31] (TMPIN0)
Temperature 1 40°C (103°F) [0x28] (TMPIN1)
Temperature 2 22°C (71°F) [0x16] (TMPIN2)
Fan 0 2755 RPM [0xF5] (FANIN0)
Fan 1 1753 RPM [0x181] (FANIN1)
Fan 2 1735 RPM [0x185] (FANIN2)
Register space LPC, base address = 0x0A10

00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F
00 19 10 FF 07 00 00 00 00 00 80 64 0F 07 F5 81 85
10 FF FF FF 70 D7 40 40 40 00 01 01 FF FF FF FF FF
20 41 75 BA BC D6 4A 44 BD A6 31 28 16 80 4F D0 D0
30 FF FF FF FF F7 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
40 FF FF FF FF FF FF 5F 74 2D 40 9C 00 FF FF FF FF
50 FF 31 7F 7F 7F 50 00 00 90 00 0B 12 60 00 00 00
60 7F 7F 7F 00 00 64 FF FF 7F 7F 7F 00 00 64 FF FF
70 7F 7F 7F 00 00 64 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
80 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 00
90 FF 00 00 00 FF 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
A0 50 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
B0 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
C0 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
D0 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
E0 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
F0 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

Hardware monitor Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450
Temperature 0 52°C (125°F) [0x30] (Core #0)
Temperature 1 51°C (123°F) [0x31] (Core #1)
Temperature 2 47°C (116°F) [0x35] (Core #2)
Temperature 3 47°C (116°F) [0x35] (Core #3)

Hardware monitor Hitachi HDT725025VLA380
Temperature 0 46°C (114°F) [0x2E] (Assembly)

Hardware monitor WDC WD4000YR-01PLB0
Temperature 0 43°C (109°F) [0x2B] (Assembly)


Processors
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Number of processors 1
Number of threads 4

APICs
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Processor 0
-- Core 0
-- Thread 0 0
-- Core 1
-- Thread 0 1
-- Core 2
-- Thread 0 2
-- Core 3
-- Thread 0 3

Processors Information
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Processor 1 ID = 0
Number of cores 4 (max 4)
Number of threads 4 (max 4)
Name Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450
Codename Yorkfield
Specification Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q9450 @ 2.66GHz
Package (platform ID) Socket 775 LGA (0x4)
CPUID 6.7.7
Extended CPUID 6.17
Core Stepping C1
Technology 45 nm
Core Speed 1997.4 MHz
Multiplier x FSB 6.0 x 332.9 MHz
Rated Bus speed 1331.6 MHz
Stock frequency 2666 MHz
Instructions sets MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, EM64T
L1 Data cache 4 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative, 64-byte line size
L1 Instruction cache 4 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative, 64-byte line size
L2 cache 2 x 6144 KBytes, 24-way set associative, 64-byte line size
FID/VID Control yes
FID range 6.0x - 8.0x
Max VID 1.175 V
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about voltages
  1. CM not really known for quality PSUs... i would RMA that thing asap, and get something else... while probably fine... those things arent really healthy for your components, your run the chance of overvolting something.. not good
  2. Check the voltages in BIOS.BIOS voltage readings are fairly accurate.
    Softwares don't have that accuracy.

    HWmonitor shows my +5V rating as +6.85V lol...
  3. (1) Ignore -12/-5 voltage readings , Normally not ever present for modern Systems
    (2) +12 V - System probably would not operate at that level Min = 12V - 5% = 11.4 V . As shubham1404 stated - Check in BIOS>

    Added point. The Bios reading will be with a very light load. BEST option is to use a DVM (Multimeter) and measure black wire to Yellow wire on a molex connector - Very easy to do, and safe.

    Measure the +12 V after booting to operating system then Run a program to load +12V ( I normally use Furmark - can google) Note this is the important +12V level, should not drop below 11.4 (I normally use 11.6 as min).

    PS A cheap Multimeter can be found at most discount auto stores, or walmart. Sligthly more expensive at Radioshack. I highly recomment a DVM as they can be iinvalueble not only for the compute, but also around the house/car.
  4. ^ Multimeter readings are very accurate.
    Though you can borrow it too :)

    Won't take more than 10mins to check.
  5. ^ Yes, with qualifier "Nornmaly" as I alway verify, and repeat periodically. Very easy - get one if thoes little battery holder for "AAA" or "AA" batteries Puts 4 batteries in series. use New batteries and measure should read 6.2 Volts (1.55 x4). All three of my meters are $100 Plus meters.

    Old analog meter had a red dot and on the 1.5 Volt scale while measuring a "D" cell you adjusted so the meter was on the red dot. (When I say old, I mean REALLY old.
  6. RetiredChief said:
    (1) Ignore -12/-5 voltage readings ,

    Not quite true. The -5 volt requirement went away years ago. That used to be carried by a white wire that used to go to the empty pin on the PSU main power connector. The blue wire carries -12 volts. It's primarily used for the RS-232 port and analog audio circuits.
  7. jsc
    You are correct, (neg 1 to me)
    But a number of new MB do not even include a RS232, or for that matter a parallel port. On many of the new system to use a serial port (which I do - O'scope) a Usb to serial adaptor is required which does not provide the -12 V, only a +5 v. Would not be surprised if this requirement did not go the way of the dodo bird as did the -5 in 2002

    Very few, if any, software programs for newer systems will report a -12V correcly.
  8. Using a voltmeter is good, however you can only use it to measure at the connector which doesn't represent voltage at other points of the board. The program you used HW monitor is pretty good. It measures at points in the circuit determined by monitoring sensors installed for that specific purpose.
    The question becomes how do the 2 measurements compare, hopefully the same. If the power supply is good and you have poor results at the sensor points it may be the motherboard pwm circuit weakining.
    With modern boards the (-) voltages won't trigger properly unless under load that explains variations in them. Similarly the 5v vcch standby may vary as well. Since the allowable limits are 5% on the +3.3, +5.0 and +12.0 it looks like you have a problem.
    I can't get back to your screen shot right now as some porn site grabbed hold of it, but from what I remember from the first glance the +12v was way too high, the +3.3v was too low but the +5.0v was good. Memory and other values looked ok, there has to be some consideration for processor power state (power saving mode). Since you have some voltages too high and some too low I would say you have a problem.
    Also the variation allowed is 10% on (-)negative voltages but as I said they won't reflect accurately on many boards without being under heavy load.
  9. roonj
    While the +12 and the +5 at the molex are not identical to what is at the MB sensors, they should be very close, Probably less than 0.1 volt. Reason (1) if single +12 Rail the only diff would be the IR drop on the 20/24 Pin connector or the 4/8 pin MB connector and trace IR drop. True for +5 V

    (2) In The vast majority of multirail +12 V's they are fed from a single point and only diff would be IR drop of the overcurrent protection circuit in individual rails. This means that if the +12 V is low on Rail 1 then the voltage present on the other rails would also be low. (Note I checked my voltages at the 24 pin connector, 8 pin MB connector, the pcie GPU connector and a molex - they were all within 0.05 Volts of each other. +5 V rail is single.
  10. Well I'm not sure what RetiredChief's point is in the last posting, I'm fully aware of the implications of virtual rails as opposed to dedicated rails maybe just info?
    Real problem as I see it is the +3.3v is below the allowed level of degradation and the +12.0v is above the allowed levels which is 5% for both.
    3.3v minimum allowed (3.135v) not 2.98 which is double whats allowable.
    12.0v maximum allowed (12.6v) not 13.7v which is more than double the allowable.
    Since these measurements are being provided by the sensors If the power supply is good than the motherboard power regulation system is failing.
  11. Best answer
    reply to roonj
    My comment was in reference to your comment that the molex was not a valid measurement as to voltages on the MB. The molex measurement is a valid measurement of the output of The PSU. For the 3.3 V - it can be measured at the 20/24 Pin connector. Just a little harder to do, and more care needs to be taken - I use a straight pin with the black lead inserted in to the Black on a Molex connector or clipped to the case..

    As to "power regulators failing on the MB" - There are none, Ther are regulators that convert the +12 (and +3.3V) to a lower voltage. The sensors could be bad, but I do not think two would be bad.

    Agree 3.3 and 12 are out of spec. As others, and I have stated - Check Bios as these are normally correct and that the best way is to use a DVM. Most likely cause in his case is PSU (But on that vane, most PSUs provide a lower than normal voltage, only rarely output a significantly higher voltage - But possible.

    Added - I only replied for others as I think the OP Abandoned his thread without getting back on "Fix", or if still has a problem.
  12. Best answer selected by xcreamer.
  13. Thanks all :)
  14. RetiredChief said:
    reply to roonj
    My comment was in reference to your comment that the molex was not a valid measurement as to voltages on the MB. The molex measurement is a valid measurement of the output of The PSU. For the 3.3 V - it can be measured at the 20/24 Pin connector. Just a little harder to do, and more care needs to be taken - I use a straight pin with the black lead inserted in to the Black on a Molex connector or clipped to the case..

    As to "power regulators failing on the MB" - There are none, Ther are regulators that convert the +12 (and +3.3V) to a lower voltage. The sensors could be bad, but I do not think two would be bad.

    Agree 3.3 and 12 are out of spec. As others, and I have stated - Check Bios as these are normally correct and that the best way is to use a DVM. Most likely cause in his case is PSU (But on that vane, most PSUs provide a lower than normal voltage, only rarely output a significantly higher voltage - But possible.

    Added - I only replied for others as I think the OP Abandoned his thread without getting back on "Fix", or if still has a problem.


    Read through this thread and it comes close to answering my question, which is: I have an old PC with an Asus P3B-F MB (1999). The PC's power supply unit just gave out. I have tried 3 new ones and they all have the same problem - the BIOS refuses to let the PC boot because the -5v supply is actually -6.13v. The other voltages are all Ok. I read in this thread that modern PCs don't use -5v but with my old PC can I just tell the BIOS not to monitor this voltage and ignore the problem?
  15. Unfortunately, that isn't what determines whether or not the system will boot. The BIOS is only monitoring the voltage for you, not for the rest of the system.

    What determines if the system is going to try to boot is the state of the PowerOK line. When (if) it detects all the PSU outputs present, the control line goes to a Logic HIGH, removes a hardware reset, and permits the CPU to boot.
  16. +1 ^

    The first thing I would do reseat (couple of Times all connections to the MB (ie 20/24 Pin connector, ATX 4/8 Pin connector if you have, memory, and any add on cards such as GPU).

    It is possible that A) something on the MB died and took out PSU or The PSU died taking out the MB (Kind of egg vs chicken - which came first _ I know they solved that, the chicken was first.)
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