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Project Dovahkiin

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  • Water Cooling
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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June 4, 2012 4:15:27 PM

I created this post primarily to share my experience in building my first Water Cooled PC.

About me:
I've built many PCs in the past but it'll be my first time building a water cooled PC (CPU only).

About this project:
This may or may not be useful for everyone but I figured if I'm going to put a fair amount of time and cash into this, might as well share with the community. I'll be comparing the results (benchmarks) between the old PC, the new PC and then once it's OCed. Furthermore, I'll be sharing every little bit of how the rig will get built from choosing components to putting them together (water cooling included). References, images and videos will be shared throughout this project so stay tuned if you're planning on following this thread.

Old PC versus New PC Components:

Old PC:
- XFX NFORCE 680I LT SLI
- OCZ Platinum 4 Gigs Dual DDR2 @ 800MHz
- Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 @ 2.4GHz w/ ChillTec Thermo Electric CPU Cooler
- Zotac GTX 560 Ti OC 1GB

New PC:
- MSI Z77A-GD65
- G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 2400
- Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz
- 2 Zotac GTX 560 Ti OC 1GB (now in SLI * updated)

Water Cooling Component:
- Swiftech MCRES-MICRO REV2 Reservoir
- Swiftech MCP655-B Industrial Pump
- Swiftech MCR240-QP Radiator (2X140MM)
- Primochill Primoflex Pro LRT Clear Tubbing
- XSPC Raystorm CPU Water Block
- Bitspower BP-CPF-CC5 Sraight Compression Fittings
- Swiftech Adjustable Black Hose Clamps

Liquid Coolant (Homemade *untested* formula):
- Primary Coolant: Steam-Distilled Water (~99%)
- Surfactants: None...
- Corrosion Protection: Components used in the loop are Copper, Silver and plastic, which are all non-corrosive items.
- Anti-Freeze solution: None...
- Biocides: HTH Super Extended Algae Guard (if I can find it). (~1%)
- Extras: Feser View Active UV Dye

*Edited: I decided not to use Methanol (which was included in the original formula). The reason being methanol's termal conductivity performance. What was interesting with Methanol is it's viscosity (and it's anti-freezing properties) but the termal conductivity of water outweights the performance gain from having more water in the formula.

If you need more information on liquids for water cooling systems, check out this guide:
http://www.overclockers.com/pc-water-coolant-chemistry-...

For more information on the basics of heat transfer, check out this guide:
http://www.koolance.com/cooling101_heat_transfer


Update: June 20, 2012
Stage 1: Testing the components.

Before installing my water cooling loop, it's important to test each component to make sure everything works well (and stable). Using the stock cooler that came with my CPU, i've run Prime95 for 12 hrs (Ran "In-Place large FFTs" to test out as much of my system as possible). Luckily, i woke up this morning with no errors and highest heat being 70C (which was expected as I'm only using stock cooler).

Now, that I know my system is stable, I'll be adding all components (except the water cooling loop) and run another instances of 12hrs. By other components I mean adding my other SSD drive (that one is meant for gaming) and my 2 HDD drives (mostly for multimedia storage), my videocard, my fan switches, etc.).

Update: June 21, 2012
Stage 2: Prepping the oven.

Now that all my components are working well and stable, it's time to clean up the messy situation i've created (referring to loose cables and tones of wires hanging everywhere) and most importantly, figuring out where all the cooling components will be sitting. It'll be a tight fit but I think i can manage with proper planning.

Update: June 29, 2012
Stage 3: Benchmarks?

I've had my parts for around 2 weeks now but I'm missing my radiator (it was back ordered even on Swiftech's website). They said I should get it within the next 2 weeks. As soon as I get my secondary gpu, i'll start benchmarking the new system (with stock settings and stock heatsink....then, i'll setup the WC system, OC, ...and benchmark against the stock system. Since I'm waiting on my radiator, I figured I'd start doing some benchmarks.

I'll be committing to an extensive benchmarks. Should include:

CPU:
1 - Q6600
2 - 3770k (non turbo)
3 - 3770k Turbo
4 - 3770k Full OC

GPU:
- Single vs Dual GPUs (or SLI)
- Regular display vs 3d Vision enabled (1080p on single monitor)
- Stock vs stable stock air-cooled OC (so I don't expect miracles here...even 5% would be great).

Software:
- Crysis (because I love that they have both a CPU and a GPU tester)
- Metro 2033 (because the game's a beast)
- GTA 4 (because this game represent CPU heavy games)
- Unigin Heaven (because it'll fully test all DX11 features)
- Crysis 2 (because of it's in-game 3D rendering capabilities with stereoscopic)

Additional software: (these won't be part of all tests because they're either biased or I simply didn't test the old rid with them...)
- Futurmark: 3DMark Vantage (CPU + DX10 GPU tests)
- Futurmark: 3DMark 11 (CPU + DX11 GPU tests)
- Battlefield 3 Multiplayer (because MP is way heavier than SP)
- The Elder Scroll - Skyrim
- Probably other applications that show other parts of the system... (like load times SSD versus HDD, etc.).

I'll create another post for these benchmarks and link them here to keep things focussed.

More about : project dovahkiin

a c 150 K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 6:25:28 AM

Um, first off why are you trying to watercool a i7-3770S? It's a low powered cpu designed for server work. If you wanted to overclock, you would have gotten a 3770K.
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 6:41:40 AM

I'm with amuffin on this. Get the right CPU for the job! If you're spending that kind of money on a water cooling loop you might as well go for a 3770K or a 3930K

I'll offer two pieces of advice for watercooling

1. Don't bother with special coolant. Pick up some 50/50 ethylene-glycol/water antifreeze and use that. 50/50 is a bit more viscous than water but it shouldn't give any pumps problems once its warmed up a bit. If you want, you can mix it with equal volumes of distilled water to dilute it to 25/75 but from my experience any pump worth its weight wont have any trouble with it. It also lubricates your pump and keeps the entire loop clean. The only drawback is that it smells a bit if you have any leaks. On the plus side, you will know if you have leaks. It also looks cool

2. Your loop needs to be pressure tight. If it isn't, you will get air in your loop over time. Every joint needs to be secured with either a compression fitting (expensive but cool looking) or a hose wrap (cheap but PITA to install). If you ever have to open up a waterblock you must caulk the entire seal with a sealant, preferably a silicon based one. The same goes for the pump and any barbs that could use it. In the case of barbs, make sure you caulk the seal and not the threads.
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Related resources
a c 190 K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 9:25:35 AM

I'll go even cheaper on the coolant pinhedd, plain distilled and a killcoil, UV cathode if you want overkill/pretty lights
and I've never used caulk on fittings, clamps/compression fittings or cableties work well enough, although I have known some to use pfte tape on a leaky fitting before,

@Op check the W/c sticky out if you are going to pursue this, it will give you some good ground knowledge to work from :) 
Moto
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June 5, 2012 12:53:14 PM

amuffin said:
Um, first off why are you trying to watercool a i7-3770S? It's a low powered cpu designed for server work. If you wanted to overclock, you would have gotten a 3770K.


Hi Muffin. Thanks for the feedback.

I'll be completely honest and admit that I wasn't sure what the difference was between the "S" version and the "K" version other than one of them was 50$ cheaper. I got this CPU because it was slightly higher than the budget I gave myself but had much more power than the other CPUs I was looking at (i5 series). I've confirmed your statement by looking online and from what I can tell, the average stable overclock achievable by this CPU goes from 3.1GHz to 3.9GHz (a 25% clock difference). Now, how hot it'll get at that clock I'm not sure yet.

This has changed things a little (and I don't see it as a bad thing). As I've mentioned above, I'm not going for the OC record but simply getting a little more out of my CPU. The decision for going with a water cooling solution was primarily for long term investment (simply upgrading the system rather than buying a whole new heatsink everytime) as well as reducing noise levels.

Depending on how hot my CPU gets at a stable clock, I might consider cooling my GPU with this system as well (not my initial plans but i'll adapt).

The i7-3770S might not be the better version of the CPU but at stock, it's a much better bang for you buck than it's "K" version (calculating this from both cpubenchmark.net and Futuremark.com). Then again, once overclocked, the "K" might get the lead, but it's too late to change it back.

Either way, thanks for the heads-up.
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June 5, 2012 1:15:19 PM

Pinhedd said:
I'm with amuffin on this. Get the right CPU for the job! If you're spending that kind of money on a water cooling loop you might as well go for a 3770K or a 3930K

I'll offer two pieces of advice for watercooling

1. Don't bother with special coolant. Pick up some 50/50 ethylene-glycol/water antifreeze and use that. 50/50 is a bit more viscous than water but it shouldn't give any pumps problems once its warmed up a bit. If you want, you can mix it with equal volumes of distilled water to dilute it to 25/75 but from my experience any pump worth its weight wont have any trouble with it. It also lubricates your pump and keeps the entire loop clean. The only drawback is that it smells a bit if you have any leaks. On the plus side, you will know if you have leaks. It also looks cool

2. Your loop needs to be pressure tight. If it isn't, you will get air in your loop over time. Every joint needs to be secured with either a compression fitting (expensive but cool looking) or a hose wrap (cheap but PITA to install). If you ever have to open up a waterblock you must caulk the entire seal with a sealant, preferably a silicon based one. The same goes for the pump and any barbs that could use it. In the case of barbs, make sure you caulk the seal and not the threads.



I've already bought most of my watercooling component except for the liquid itself. I'll update the main post (above) to let you guys know what I'll be using. I'm new at this so my initial intentions were to put in a Blue colored liquid (check link below). As you can see, i'm not taking any chances. I've gotten silver compress fittings. I'll be putting compress fittings on almost every component (though I've bought good barbs in case.

http://ncix.com/products/?sku=64226&vpn=EK-Ekoolant%20U...


*Edited*: I'll be creating my own formula.

Thanks for the feedback!
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a c 190 K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 1:32:44 PM

There really is no point in having coloured non-corrosive coolant,
in six months when you break the loop to flush/clean out you would have to spend another $15 on fresh, and its only non-conductive for about 2 minutes?
once its been through the pump its gets conductive through ionisation
and for coloured loops, coloured tubing is a better option but no big deal, just keep an eye out for staining/ dye breakdown
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 1:50:42 PM

Alex The PC Gamer said:
I've already bought most of my watercooling component except for the liquid itself. I'll update the main post (above) to let you guys know what I'll be using. I'm new at this so my initial intentions were to put in a Blue colored liquid (check link below). As you can see, i'm not taking any chances. I've gotten silver compress fittings. I'll be putting compress fittings on almost every component (though I've bought good barbs in case.

http://ncix.com/products/?sku=64226&vpn=EK-Ekoolant%20U...


I'll consider your liquid recommendations if I ever upgrade my water cooling system but for now, I'll stick with the coolant i picked (link above).

Thanks for the feedback!


I actually used that UV dye before, it's garbage. It'll last a couple of weeks and then just fade away.

Antifreeze is cheaper and holds its glow forever

+1 for ordering from NCIX, I get everything from there
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June 5, 2012 1:52:10 PM

Pinhedd said:
I actually used that UV dye before, it's garbage. It'll last a couple of weeks and then just fade away.

Antifreeze is cheaper and holds its glow forever

+1 for ordering from NCIX, I get everything from there



What are you using now?
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 2:01:40 PM

Alex The PC Gamer said:
What are you using now?


The only watercooled PC that I use currently has a Corsair H100 (sig)

My old watercooled QX9650 is with a gal friend of mine and is cooled using the 50/50 premixed antifreeze that I mentioned above
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 3:09:37 PM

Pinhedd said:
The only watercooled PC that I use currently has a Corsair H100 (sig)

My old watercooled QX9650 is with a gal friend of mine and is cooled using the 50/50 premixed antifreeze that I mentioned above


I have used antifreeze for years without issues but the guys here are firm believers that the closer you can keep it to pure distilled water the better the temps will be so now I will be using this mix in my system

I will probably never go to straight distilled water but now I will have a mix of 97% distilled water a couple of drops of the algae guard and 3% water wetter to protect from corrosion. before it was a 18% antifreeze 3% water wetter and 80% distilled water. so now i am at least closer to the best cooling possible
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June 5, 2012 3:11:23 PM

Pinhedd said:
The only watercooled PC that I use currently has a Corsair H100 (sig)

My old watercooled QX9650 is with a gal friend of mine and is cooled using the 50/50 premixed antifreeze that I mentioned above


I considered buying the Corsair H100 (as I'm building something similar = Dual Rad, etc.) but this would have defeated my purpose of building a water cooling system (long term system). i also heard it can get pretty loud (which would have defeated my other purpose of building such a system). What's you experience with it?

I'm looking into a good liquid coolant (i'll make my own). I'll post my updates.
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 3:22:01 PM

I am a firm believer in the quite water cooled system with is one of the reasons that I do it. the only issue with making the system quite, is that it will require more rads than a system designed for high RPM fans with high FPI rads. this type of system is very efficient when you consider the rad space required to do the job, but it can get very loud as a result. since I have my system in my room I needed it to be as quite as possible while I sleep, with 3 120mm x 240mm rads I was able to turn the fans off at night and the system still ran cool at idol. when I play a game I simply turn the fans up, they are all low RPM fans and low FPI rads so even on full blast it is not that loud.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 3:28:10 PM

Same as, over-radding and slower fans means a pretty much silent rig,
as this video shows

with the option of cranking it up for some clocking sessions if desired,
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2012 5:05:51 PM

Alex The PC Gamer said:
I considered buying the Corsair H100 (as I'm building something similar = Dual Rad, etc.) but this would have defeated my purpose of building a water cooling system (long term system). i also heard it can get pretty loud (which would have defeated my other purpose of building such a system). What's you experience with it?

I'm looking into a good liquid coolant (i'll make my own). I'll post my updates.


I went with the H100 because I didn't feel like spending a whole lot of time just to move the cooling loop over. I'm pretty happy with it though
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June 7, 2012 5:56:41 PM

amuffin said:
Um, first off why are you trying to watercool a i7-3770S? It's a low powered cpu designed for server work. If you wanted to overclock, you would have gotten a 3770K.


I was sort'of bummed out about my CPU choice so I ended up making a bit of research since I was considering returning/exchanging my CPU.
Comparison Link: http://ark.intel.com/compare/65523,65524

The one thing they don't tell NEWBZ like me is the naming convention. You were right, apparently, the 3770S doesn't budge its multipliers which means you can't overclock the chip at all!

I'm in the process of returning my CPU and replacing it with the 3770K version. Or should I go for a different CPU? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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June 11, 2012 6:00:45 PM

Ok, so I'm slowly receiving my parts. I do need some confirmation about my water cooling liquid formula from people that are a little more expert (with chemicals).

Primary Coolant:
I chose Steam-Distilled water to lower the risk of bacteria growth.

Surfactants:
I know many people use Water Wetter but it’s practically impossible to get in Canada for some reason. Most popular stores like Canadian Tire, Walmart, etc don’t carry it anymore and after calling about 5-6 ATV/motorcycle store around my neighborhood none had it for sale. So I give up. I also hear water wetter leave a substance on your tubing. I looked at similar products like Hy-per lube and other coolants with surfactants but I’d have to put a higher dosage and the color of these liquids would ruin my UV Blue color I’m so desperately trying to achieve). So, no surfactants for this formula.

Corrosion Protection (and anti-freeze protection):
I found this product (Cycle Logic Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant) and it has the following pros/cons.

Pros:
- It has anti-corrosive properties
- Protects against anti-freezing (but the lowest I’ll go is room temp so…)
- It’s environmentally friendly
- It’s Blue!

Cons:
- Its viscosity is slightly higher than regular engine coolants (by about 3-4%).

Other:
- It’s a Propylene Glycol (not a Ethylene Glycol) product.

Link to product: http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/4/Auto/Powersport...


Biocides:
It’s a Copper Sulfate based product. I’ll be putting ½ tbsp. of the product (will dissolve in water). Here’s the link: http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/2/OutdoorLiving/P...

Note that I also have silver plated Compression Fittings. Silver also has natural properties that kills the “food” necessary for bacteria to grow…although I’m not sure how effective that is in practise.

So the formula ratios would go as follows:
Steam-Distilled Water: ~85%
Ice Engine Coolant: ~15%
Sulfate Copper Crystals: ~less than 1%

Does that formula make any sense? Should I make the ratio 80/20 instead to really make sure no corrosion occurs?
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a c 334 K Overclocking
June 11, 2012 6:12:50 PM

Distilled water only and some biocide is all that most of us use...maybe a killcoil, although there is a debate of how much that actually prevents grown. As for distilled and biocide; I've used that for years and never had any issues. You really only need coolants with anti-corrosives if you are running mixed metals in your loop that includes aluminum. Otherwise, brass, copper, nickel, silver, etc. all play together fairly well.
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June 11, 2012 6:15:48 PM

I won't have any Aluminium components in the loop from what I can tell. Mostly Copper and silver metals will be in contact with the water. I'll look in more deeply in each components to make sure that is true. So what you're saying is no Engine Ice required if no aluminium is found in the loop? That'd be awesome!
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June 11, 2012 6:29:02 PM

Ok so I've checked and the only thing with aluminium that'll be in contact with water in the loop is my reservoir, which has 2 fillport fillings in anodized aluminum.

According to wikipedia:

"Aluminium alloys are anodized to increase corrosion resistance, to increase surface hardness, and to allow dyeing (coloring), improved lubrication, or improved adhesion. The anodic layer is non-conductive."

I do have 2 spare silver plated compress fittings (i think) so i might opt to use those instead...but would these anodized aluminium fittings be a problem for my loop if I don't use anti-corrosive agents?

Edit: I should mention that these fittings are included with my Switftech reservoir.
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a c 334 K Overclocking
June 11, 2012 6:50:23 PM

Surprising that Swiftech would ever include anything aluminum with their components. Are you sure it's not plated brass or something else?
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June 11, 2012 7:19:22 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Surprising that Swiftech would ever include anything aluminum with their components. Are you sure it's not plated brass or something else?


I just opened the box for my reservoir and...well, neither Brass nor anodized aluminium fittings were included - they included plastics ones. I've double checked and the site was referring to seperate components they sell to go with this reservoir so...

That said, I do have 2 spare silver compress fittings so I'll use those instead.

Would it be a bad thing (chemically) to use the plastic ones instead if I ever needed to silver plated fittings somewhere else?
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a c 334 K Overclocking
June 11, 2012 7:21:57 PM

I use nylon/plastic ones in my current loop and haven't had any issues. They are non-reactive with any of the metals and you likely shouldn't be introducing anything that would harm the fittings. If you were, you'd also have an issue with it effecting tubing, delrin tops and reservoirs.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
June 11, 2012 7:22:14 PM

Nope, plastics fine, its aluminium that could have been a problem :) 
anodised or not i wouldn't have it in there
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
June 11, 2012 8:56:54 PM


So the formula ratios would go as follows:
Steam-Distilled Water: ~85%
Ice Engine Coolant: ~15%
Sulfate Copper Crystals: ~less than 1%

Does that formula make any sense? Should I make the ratio 80/20 instead to really make sure no corrosion occurs?

I recently went through this myself and here is what I came up with
97% distilled water
3% water wetter
3 drops of HTH super extended algae guard
before I was using 80% distilled water 3% water wetter 17% antifreeze worked fine for years but after being on tom's for a while now I decided to try and bring my mix closer to pure water.

sulfate copper is a acid and could become hazardous to your blocks(EX: eating a hole to the outside of your block ) not with the ice engine additive you have selected but look at how much of that is needed to do the job 15% water wetter requires less 3% but the CCX pro is the best only 1% is necessary within the loop to do the job.
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June 12, 2012 12:07:31 PM

toolmaker_03 said:
So the formula ratios would go as follows:
Steam-Distilled Water: ~85%
Ice Engine Coolant: ~15%
Sulfate Copper Crystals: ~less than 1%

Does that formula make any sense? Should I make the ratio 80/20 instead to really make sure no corrosion occurs?

I recently went through this myself and here is what I came up with
97% distilled water
3% water wetter
3 drops of HTH super extended algae guard
before I was using 80% distilled water 3% water wetter 17% antifreeze worked fine for years but after being on tom's for a while now I decided to try and bring my mix closer to pure water.

sulfate copper is a acid and could become hazardous to your blocks(EX: eating a hole to the outside of your block ) not with the ice engine additive you have selected but look at how much of that is needed to do the job 15% water wetter requires less 3% but the CCX pro is the best only 1% is necessary within the loop to do the job.


Ya I was a little late in updating that formula.

I'll be going 99% Steam Distilled Water with no surfactant. I don't plan on using any surfactants because I simply can't find anything good at local stores. ***Seems like Ottawa is no surfactant-friendly***!!! I'll also drop a tiny dose of biocide.

Speaking of which, I thought copper sulfate was fine but i'll do more research. I've seen what most guys (you) use on Toms (that HTH stuff) so I'll try to find a bottle at my local store.
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 1:20:45 PM

I use PT Nuke, which is essentially slightly watered-down Copper Sulfate. You won't need very much - my loop takes about a gallon and I use 3-4 drops at most. No build up or anything in mine.

Also, I hope you didn't pay a ton for "Steam-distilled water." Distilled water, by definition, is boiled into steam in order to leave behind the impurities and then condensed back into a liquid. ;) 
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June 12, 2012 1:27:36 PM

boiler1990 said:
I use PT Nuke, which is essentially slightly watered-down Copper Sulfate. You won't need very much - my loop takes about a gallon and I use 3-4 drops at most. No build up or anything in mine.

Also, I hope you didn't pay a ton for "Steam-distilled water." Distilled water, by definition, is boiled into steam in order to leave behind the impurities and then condensed back into a liquid. ;) 


Ya, steam-distilled is the same as distilled...or at least it's what I meant.
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 2:25:00 PM

I was just hoping you didn't pay for some kind of "special super-duper steam distilled water." :D 
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 3:03:57 PM

boiler1990 said:
I use PT Nuke, which is essentially slightly watered-down Copper Sulfate. You won't need very much - my loop takes about a gallon and I use 3-4 drops at most. No build up or anything in mine.

Also, I hope you didn't pay a ton for "Steam-distilled water." Distilled water, by definition, is boiled into steam in order to leave behind the impurities and then condensed back into a liquid. ;) 


so than it is not acidic enough to cause problems, that is good to hear. do you use any other additives to your loop other than the PT nuke?

**edit i am only curious :whistle:  **
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 3:11:44 PM

No, only PT Nuke and distilled. I think the low amounts + all-copper components limits chemical reactivity significantly.
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 3:37:58 PM

yes I would have to agree, do you ever check the PH just to see what it is? or never warred to much about it? you haven't had any issues so there is no need to do so once a gene I am only curios.
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a b K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 4:22:52 PM

No, I don't bother with that.

According to Petra's Tech Shop (the producer of PT Nuke), the solution is only 4.1%, and recommend that you put in 1-2 drops per liter (or about 4-8 per gallon).

2 drops per liter is 1.14 part per million (0.00000114 or 0.000114%), so there's barely anything in there.
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a c 334 K Overclocking
June 12, 2012 4:58:01 PM

You don't need much to kill crawlies, just like it doesn't take much cyanide to kill a person.
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June 22, 2012 12:56:34 PM

Just a little update...

I got all my components except for my Swiftech Radiator (Dual 140MM). I've done all my stress tests and all components are good to go. As soon as I get my radiator it'll be setup time!
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July 18, 2012 6:52:33 PM

Yeah! Got my radiator today (it's about freggin time!).

That said, I'm pulling overtime at work this week (C++ crazyness) but I'll try and record some vids of what's going on with my build. With the stock coolers, my rig's running super smoothly (except for the stock CPU cooler when it goes fubar with noise levels every once in a while).
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a c 334 K Overclocking
July 18, 2012 7:10:49 PM

Sounds a lot like me...I don't code, but work in healthcare IT so I know what it means to be crazy busy.

Good luck...when you find time, don't forget to update us.
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July 24, 2012 2:04:38 PM

Ok so I started playing with my system this weekend only to realize I'm missing 1 140mm fan to complement my "dual" 140mm fan or 240mm swiftech radiator...

*** tap on the forehead***

I already have one fan that came with my NZXT case (model: NZXT FZ-140mm nonLED).

Now, I'm looking at improving the DBA levels coming out of this system. In other words, I'll be buying two 140MM fans that are quieter than a typical fan. Now, here comes the obvious...the more RPM = more noise.

But, I've done a bit of research and it seems that Noctua makes really good fans. After looking at many reviews, I found this model to be super quiet and effecient but the max speed on these are 1200RPM.

edit: Oops, the model i'm looking at is: Noctua NF-P14FLX 140mm Ultra Quiet Cooling Fan 750-1200RPM 71-110M3/H 10.1-19.6DBA Molex

My question is...is that enought to cool a radiator? Or should I go for those 2000RPM fans?
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July 24, 2012 2:20:19 PM

Bah, nevermind, I just ordered 3 of these babies (2 for the rad) and one for the side (to shoot at my SLI cards) which are non-WC ATM.
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