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How far of an OC can I get the i5-3570k with a CoolerMaster V6 GT?

Last response: in Overclocking
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June 7, 2012 4:18:16 PM

Hello, title says it all pretty much. I'll be using either a HAF 922 mid tower case with pretty good air flow or a full tower case.

These are the full tower cases I might be using:
Cougar http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Rosewill Thor V2 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'm aiming for 4.0 Ghz. I'll also be using either an MSI z77a gd65 board or a asrock z77 extreme6.

Thanks!

More about : 3570k coolermaster

a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
June 7, 2012 4:42:28 PM

As far as it will let you.
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June 7, 2012 4:45:23 PM

Okay, thanks.
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a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
June 7, 2012 5:01:16 PM

Aw ok fine, I'll explain.

All CPUs are cut from a wafer, and they are all slightly unique to eachother. Better ones end up as high end CPUs, while worse ones get parts cut out (cores, cache) and are sold as lower end CPUs.

Sometimes though, the yields are all really good but they still need to sell lower end CPUs, so they cut perfectly good ones.

What this means is that there is a distribution curve of performance for any given CPU model. I don't know what people generally get on Ivy Bridge, but with Sandy Bridge 4.4-4.5 was pretty typical for a 2500k.

Some CPUs could only acheive 4.3 with moderate settings, while some could hit 4.6. But, generally, 4.4 or 4.5 was attainable with moderate settings. In any case, you can always push it beyond that with more voltage, and that is when you start to need really good cooling. Even then, electromigration will be more pronounced so your CPU will wear out faster.

Motherboards also help with OCing by having better voltage regulating circuitry, and of course a good PSU is also helpful.

A V6GT is a solid cooler, so I see no reason you wouldn't hit at least an average OC speed with moderate voltage settings. 4ghz should be no problem.
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June 7, 2012 5:03:22 PM

I understood the first time, silly question by me, sorry.

Thanks for the explanation though. Same thing happened with my amd 1055t, I saw many people getting 3.6ghz+ on it, but I could only achieve 3.4 with it.
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June 7, 2012 5:39:02 PM

Best answer selected by Iceycold.
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June 23, 2013 6:11:57 PM

wolfram23 said:
Aw ok fine, I'll explain.

All CPUs are cut from a wafer, and they are all slightly unique to eachother. Better ones end up as high end CPUs, while worse ones get parts cut out (cores, cache) and are sold as lower end CPUs.

Sometimes though, the yields are all really good but they still need to sell lower end CPUs, so they cut perfectly good ones.

What this means is that there is a distribution curve of performance for any given CPU model. I don't know what people generally get on Ivy Bridge, but with Sandy Bridge 4.4-4.5 was pretty typical for a 2500k.

Some CPUs could only acheive 4.3 with moderate settings, while some could hit 4.6. But, generally, 4.4 or 4.5 was attainable with moderate settings. In any case, you can always push it beyond that with more voltage, and that is when you start to need really good cooling. Even then, electromigration will be more pronounced so your CPU will wear out faster.

Motherboards also help with OCing by having better voltage regulating circuitry, and of course a good PSU is also helpful.

A V6GT is a solid cooler, so I see no reason you wouldn't hit at least an average OC speed with moderate voltage settings. 4ghz should be no problem.


Currently using i5 3570K on a Asus P8z77v-pro and it automatically overclocks 4.2. I never tried to go further because I'm using stock cooler. I'm building another pc and researching the haswell (i5 4670k) but I'm worried about the temperatures, I will use the cooler and H100i msi GD65 Z87. How can a company with technology so advanced launch an inferior product (for products "K") to its predecessor. Maybe they're doing it on purpose and in a few months to launch a better product, which surely they already produce. What many people think is that: they launch the product and will improve with time and launch a review: wrong! They already have the improved product, but for them what matters is sales. They are already able to produce a 50% better processor that Haswell, but we only have it in about 4 or 5 generations later, explaining: the next generation will be 10% better, and the next, 10% more ... they will not put a product 50% better in the next generation and lose 3-4 generations of sales. is revolting!
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