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Architect building computer for Revit 2010

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: Before January 19th

BUDGET RANGE: $1200 soft ceiling, $1600 hard ceiling

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Revit, Photoshop, 3dsMax, AutoCAD

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Keyboard, mouse, speakers, monitor

OVERCLOCKING: Yes
SLI OR CROSSFIRE: No

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1920x1200 (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3984239&CatId=3774)

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Needs to last me 3+ years


I'm an architecture student looking to build a dedicated desktop for working in autodesk revit, 3dsmax, and adobe - the primary program will be revit 2010 - here is the tech note which specifies how it uses hardware: http://images.autodesk.com/adsk/files/revit_tech_note.pdf
I'm planning to run 64 bit XP, and maybe in a year or two when bugs get worked out, switch to windows 7.


Processor/RAM:
I'm planning on getting an i7 920 (or maybe even 940 if there is a good reason), and overclocking it. I'm open to running older chips, but just need a little convincing. Since the i7 has replaced the FSB with something faster, I want to run top quality RAM to take advantage of this.

As I understand it, the i7 is optimized to run 3 sticks of memory, so if I want 12g of ram, is it better to run 6x2g or 3x4g? A better question would be, will the benefit of running fewer, bigger sticks, be worth the increase in cost? And if I do go with the 4g sticks, would it function OK with just 1 4g stick to start with, adding the others myself when my pocketbook allows?

Video Card:
Revit is not very GPU intensive, but like all CAD applications it mysteriously works better with cards designed for CAD instead of gaming. I found out that's just because of drivers, nothing signifiant in the hardware, so I was planning on just getting something like a GeForce 250 and soft-modding it. No reason for that card specifically, I just figured any old 1g card would more than do the trick (and still look good if I ever decide to run a game or two on the comp ;) )

HD:
In a year or two, when prices on SSDs come down, I plan on putting in a 100g+ SSD on this machine. But for now, I just want traditional storage, perhaps two 500g drives running RAID-0. I don't know the details of RAID and all that business, but I've been told "running two drives in raid-0 will speed up your "read/write" times" - and that is important because revit auto-saves very large files quite frequently.

Motherboard:
I have no clue about mobo's, I'll just use whatever I'm told is good. But this thread has me worried that my computer needs to be ready for future improvements: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/266973-30-sata-future

So.... yeah. I primarily need help figuring out this RAM business, and determining if the i7 920 is really the best chip for me. And I know that if I overclock it I shouldn't screw around, and just get a liquid cooling system to protect my investment. I don't know why but I feel like it's important to make sure the computer is optimized and sync's up with itself real nice, so I want to make sure that if the i7 works best with 3 sticks of RAM, I give it 3 sticks of RAM. If it can read the RAM faster because it has no FSB, I want the 1600MHz RAM. The question is, where will the bottleneck be?
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  1. Best answer
    Motherboard:
    Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 - $268.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128362

    CPU:
    Intel Core i7-920 Bloomfield 2.66GHz - $288.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115202

    CPU Cooler:
    Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro Rev.2 - $34.48
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

    RAM:
    Corsair XMS3 12GB (6 x 2GB) 1600 - $339.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145235

    Case:
    Antec 902 - $109.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129058

    PSU:
    Corsair CMPSU-750HX 750W - $139.99 after rebate ($159.99 before rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139010

    GPU:
    Sapphire HD 5770 - $164.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102864

    HDD:
    Western Digital Caviar Black WD7501AALS 750GB - $79.99 (x 2 for RAID 0)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136283

    Optical Drive:
    LG Black - $28.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136167

    Total - $1,536.39 after rebates ($1,556.39 before rebates)
  2. TheViper said:

    Motherboard:
    Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 - $268.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128362

    CPU Cooler:
    Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro Rev.2 - $34.48
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

    RAM:
    Corsair XMS3 12GB (6 x 2GB) 1600 - $339.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145235

    GPU:
    Sapphire HD 5770 - $164.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102864


    Why did you pick these? I'm really looking for information right now more than a shopping list.
    Since this has to last me a while, and is for my school/work, it's important to me that I understand it.
  3. Well, I'll try to throw my 2 cents in.

    CPU: If you are overclocking, there is not reason to buy the 940. The 940 is merely a higher clocked 920, which is why you will see most people around here have 920's and overclocked them (and boy do they OC!).

    RAM: Must be less than 1.65V. For your application, you may need ram quantity over ram speed. My suggestion would be to start out with 6 GB and add more as needed. Having 6 dimms might make you have to run the memory timings a little looser, but the performance impact will be negligible compared to the cost savings.

    CPU Cooler: I like core contact coolers, and the Hyper 212+ is a decent one.

    PSU: definitely don't skimp here, go Corsair, Seasonic, Antec.

    GPU: I can't help much with this. I don't know how dependent Revit is on workstation vs. gaming cards. I will say though I am a little wary of flashing the GPU BIOS to get a workstation card out of a gaming card. I don't think it is a guaranteed thing, otherwise, why would anyone buy a workstation card?
  4. Awesome replies, thanks a lot guys.

    EXT64 - can you explain why not to cut corners with the PSU? I mean I have to cut corners somewhere and I had figured that this was an ok place to do that.


    So other stuff...
    Motherboard... I don't plan on OC'ing to the extreme (maybe just 3.4ghz, none of this crazy 4 business), or to ever use SLi/Crossfire, so is it feasable to save a little money by downgrading the mobo a little? That's just sooooo expensive and I don't understand why it's necessary.

    Ram, I decided it needs to have at least 8 out of the gate, because I want to start running 64bit immediately.

    GPU, I'm still up in the air between getting a geforce and soft-modding it, or just doing things the clean way and getting a quadro fx1800. I started another thread asking about the current state of the soft-mod, because I had read that NVidia was taking steps to stop it, so we'll see how that thread goes.
  5. The PSU is the heart of the system. It is absolutely tantamount that is not be skimped on. It is the main reason systems last 6 months or 6 years. A weak PSU will not even power the system at all, a poorly built PSU can fry the system the second you hit the power button, a fluctuating PSU can degrade your components, and many other cause and effects.

    The cost of the Motherboard is due to wanting the X58 chip for i7 and 2 banks of triple channel DRR3. We can keep the i7 and DDR3 but have to drop down to dual channel or 1 bank of triple channel. Basically you want more than 6 GB's.

    Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD3R - $173.99 after rebate ($188.99 before rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128375

    Corsair XMS3 6GB (3 x 2GB) DDR3 1600 - $164.99 afire rebate ($174.99 before rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145236

    Saving:
    Mobo - $95
    RAM - $175

    Just understand that going up to 4 GB sticks will erase this savings instantly as each stick is $200+.
  6. ^+1 for not skimping on PSU. About half of the PC hardware falures are related to PSU problems. NEVER skimp on the PSU.

    @OP: The new G2xx cards CAN'T be softmodded. Only the older 8xxx cards were able to be soft modded. Even the 9xxx cards can't be softmodded. Same with ATI's side. A hard mod (aka BIOS mod) may work on the 2xx cards but it will NOT work on the ATI cards.

    Not sure about you, but I run SolidWorks 2010 on Win 7 x64 and imo, it's faster (as in display dosen't lagg) on Win 7 over XP x64. I will DL (yes, legitly, I have a student account at Autodesk) Inventor 2010 and see how it works.

    edit:
    DLing Inventor 2010, Algor Simulation, Maya,3DS, and Mudbox. Time remaining: 5 hours and 56 minutes lol.
  7. Alright, im an engineering student and have worked with solidworks and next semester will be working with AutoCAD. If i were going to build a system for that i would run these components.

    Core i7 920 - If your planning on overclocking to get anything faster would be a waste of money. Also there is no point in running anything older than an i7 if you want it to last 3 years. It will be out of date before you ever get it running.

    Motherboard - Doesnt really matter, find an x58 board that has good ratings and is name brand. DFI, Asus, etc.

    Ram - I agree 12GB would be nice, and in 3 years it might be smart to have 12GB of ram. But right now to get that much ram cost a ton of ram. I would start with 6GB of DDR3. Im not sure if the i7 can run registered ram or not. But being this is not for gaming, it might be smart to get a Xeon and some registered DDR3. For most new CPUs, there is really no benefit to running the tighter timings. Since all new CPUs had such large amounts of cache, it really reduces the need for super tight timing ram.

    Hard Drive - If you can come up with the money and you find a motherboard that supports it. A 300GB 15k SAS drive would really make your computer shine. You probably know at this point how long it can take to open edit and save a ton of drawings. The SAS drives are super fast and enterprise quality so they should last your 3 years no problem. I would also get like a 1TB WD black for a stuff drive. You could place finished files there or something.

    Video Card - For these types of programs it would really make sense to pick up a quadro or FireGL card. You dont need a lot of horse power according to the PDF. So something like a Quadro FX 580 would work well, or a FirePro V3750 would work just fine for you. If you wanted to go with something different Matrox used to have the best video quality of any card manufacture. They have come out with some new cards and are only for the professional market.

    Power Supply - I would never skimp here. Personally all i have started to use were PC power and cooling power supplies. They are pretty much the top of the line. They should last damn near forever, they have a good warranty and have always been regarded as very nice. The thing is you will not need a lot of power. 600 watts max. I have had power supplies take out whole computers when things went bad. A nice power supply will maintain voltage on the computer side when the outlet side isn't as nice.

    Haha its a lot to take in, if anyone has anything to add speak up
  8. as with most autodesk apps, you'll probably want to use an Nvidia Quadro, or an ATI FireGL card, as opposed to the equivalent consumer-grade Geforce or Radeon cards. The reason being, the Quadro and FireGL cards natively support and accelerate other engines than DirectX (which is primarily for gaming), such as OpenGL. These cards are quite a bit more expensive than the consumer cards, the top end Quadros are 2-3x as expensive as the top Geforces (i.e. ~$1500+). But you will benefit from the 3D native acceleration. You should do a little more research on this topic- there are considerably fewer people on this forum (or almost anywhere really) that understand the nuances of the Quadro and FireGL class of cards, including me, other than knowing that they are more focused on the CAD/CAM and architecture markets.

    As for CPU, again, buy the best in your budget. i7 920 is very good. I believe all of autodesk's apps support multiple cores- you need to verify revit does.

    You are still a student, but when your paychecks are tied to your computer, overclocking makes little sense as reliability is far more important than sheer speed. You'll find *VERY* few professionals, especially freelancers and self employed people, who choose to overclock their primary work machines. It's a better bet to finance a more expensive proc running at a higher speed than to risk losing income to a bad overclock. Getting a good quality PSU is in line with the reliability argument.

    I also recommend Windows 7- it's pretty good. I've been running it since March and it's good enough that I bought licenses for it, and I'm a linux guy so actually buying a license for an OS is something I'd ordinarily not do.
  9. funnyman06 said:
    Power Supply - I would never skimp here. Personally all i have started to use were PC power and cooling power supplies. They are pretty much the top of the line.


    PC Power & Cooling and Corsair are both made by Seasonic. So all 3 brands will serve you equally well and have 5 to 7 year warranties.


    I too agree about the workstation cards but given the budget, it's not really an option.
  10. They are not made by seasonic. I have been to the factory in orange county, pc power makes their own power supplies. Then again i got mine before the OCZ merger. They also do all their refurbs there. I talked to the people who worked there to find out if its worth getting a new one vs a refurbed.
  11. Seasonic makes their Silencer series as well as some others.
  12. ^Correct. Seasonic makes (most,if not all) of PC Power & Cooling PSU's internals. Even in their older units (before the OCZ merger).

    Quote:
    We see a very clean Seasonic built layout with the kind of heatsinks appropriate for cross-flow cooling.

    This is from the review for PC Power and Cooling Silencer 750W Crossfire Edition.
    See: http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story4&reid=63
    What all these manufactures (PC Power, Antec, OCZ,etc) do is just pick and add the needed capacitors which can affect the voltage stability etc. But the actual PCBs are designed by companies such as Seasonic, CWT,Delta etc. The actual PSUs also built by companies such as Seasonic,etc according to the parts selected by a company such as PC Power,OCZ or Antec.
  13. Quote:
    You should do a little more research on this topic- there are considerably fewer people on this forum (or almost anywhere really) that understand the nuances of the Quadro and FireGL class of cards, including me, other than knowing that they are more focused on the CAD/CAM and architecture markets.

    True that. I do a bit of CAD/CFD work, but by no means are my CAD designs very complex or larg. The max number of parts I ever had was probably 120-130 in an assembly (a robot design for FIRST competition), compare that with pro's who have over 1000 parts in an assembly lol. For my needs, the normal gaming cards worked OK, HOWEVER, depending on the complexity and size of the CAD designs this changes very quickly and understanding workstation GPUs is very important.
  14. Yep, for fairly simple models, you don't need much. Shoot, when I was first learning, I did all my CAD on a laptop with a ATI X1400 Mobility. So, for those who are not 100% sure, I usually recommend getting a mid range desktop card, and if that turns out to be insufficient, then get a serious workstation card.
  15. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133119You might want to look at the ASUS Supercomputer with a Xeon series 3400 processor and one of the Quadro FX cards. In the past I ran into some issues adding memory to servers more then a year after the orginal memory was installed, perhaps that's no longer a problem, but I like to buy all I'm going to use at once. You will also be able to use ECC memory with the Xeon processor, but I don't think that's necessary and it slows the system slightly. In the past we always used SCSI hard drives for workstations, but a SSD might be a better choice for you. Many of the SCSI drives are loud and expensive, but they are worlds faster, more reliable, and better at multitasking then SATA. For storage you might want to consider a NAS, you can use iSCSI which is built into Windows and most NAS boxes and have a home SAN. If it is only the one box you can connect directly with a crossover cable, a CAT-5e is OK for short distances, but I would go to CAT-6 if the distance is much over 20 feet. The big advantage of a NAS is that the cable can be up to 100 meters long so you can hide it far from the workstation so noise is no longer an issue and you can easily share files, some NAS boxes have WiFi built-in which makes it nice if you have, or plan on getting, a laptop. If you want to share with multiple computers make your life easy and just use a switch and Gigabyte Ethernet instead of the iSCSI. As for graphics the Supercomputer accepts up to 4 cards and Windows-7 allows you to mix and match so if you find a bargin you can pop it in, even mixing ATI & NVIDIA should work. If you start with a Quadro any NVIDIA card you add will accelerate CUDA applications, so if you acquired an FX-370 maybe in a year or 2 you can find some of the 200 series GeForce cards cheap since they will be obsolete for gaming. I believe all of the applications you mentioned already have CUDA plug-ins which can accelerate them many times over using just the CPU. Maybe what you are doing doesn't justify a real supercomputer today, but a year or more from now you might change your mind so do a little research before you box yourself in. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133119 it's on sale for $59.99!
  16. EXT64 said:
    So, for those who are not 100% sure, I usually recommend getting a mid range desktop card, and if that turns out to be insufficient, then get a serious workstation card.

    Agreed. +1.
  17. Jeeeesus the price of this computer will NOT stop going up. I changed the case and HD to save a couple dollars, but totally overrode that by upgrading the GPU to the damn Quadro 1800.
    I was thinking that I might just build it now with a GTS 250 (-250) to save money, and then when I install the SSD next semester, I'll also add the GPU, thats when it'll really turn from a regular desktop to a workstation.


    Motherboard:
    Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 - $268.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128362

    CPU:
    Intel Core i7-920 Bloomfield 2.66GHz - $288.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115202

    CPU Cooler:
    Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro Rev.2 - $34.48
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

    RAM:
    Corsair XMS3 12GB (6 x 2GB) 1600 - $339.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145235

    Case:
    save 50 bucks here and downgrade...
    Either the NZXT Beta or Cooler Master Centurion - $50
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146055
    or
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119068

    PSU:
    Corsair CMPSU-750HX 750W - $139.99 after rebate ($159.99 before rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139010

    GPU:
    PNY Quadro 1800 - $399.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133272&cm_re=quadro_1800-_-14-133-272-_-Product
    OR
    Gigabyte GeForce GTS 250 - $149.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125285

    HDD:
    Western Digital Caviar Black 2 500GB - $55.99 (x 2 for RAID 0)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136073

    Optical Drive:
    LG Black - $28.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136167

    Total - $1,607.41 ($1,357.41 with the Geforce instead of the Quadro)
  18. You can save $270 by making the changes I suggested earlier.
  19. BTW, I hope you realize that by using RAID-0 if anything goes wrong you lose your data. I have a 1TB WD Black and it is pretty fast. With two 500GB drives if either drive fails the volume is gone. The probability that 1 or both of 2 drives will fail is almost always going to be greater then the probability that 1 drive will fail, so that saves you a couple of bucks and also lowers your power, and cooling requirnments as well as making the thing slightly quieter and lighter to lug around.
  20. ^Agreed. RAID 0 should ONLY be used as a scratch volume for temp storage of files. For good performance and redundancy, consider RAID5 or RAID10.
  21. TheViper said:
    You can save $270 by making the changes I suggested earlier.


    I think what I'll actually do is go with that motherboard (The only difference I see is that it has 2 fewer DIMMS... thats $100?) and start with a single 4gb DIMM, and then add an additional identical stick every month or two.

    And I can't really justify having the Quadro considering how much more it costs... that GPU decision is a daily battle lol.

    As far as HDD's go, it's gonna be a single 500g to save money. Sigh.
  22. I am planning a system for my son who uses Autodesk Inventor and am trying to figure out the video card issue also. From what I have read, Inventor is dependent upon surpport for Direct3D 10 - not OpenGL. Do consumer gaming cards support Direct3D 10 (or 9) as well as a true workstation video card? Is Direct3D 10 different than DirectX? I understand the basics of computers but have not kept up to date on the technical side. My son would like to be able to play games (he is a pretty hard core console gamer) as well as run Inventor etc. Thanks for helping!

    Keith
  23. Quote:
    I am planning a system for my son who uses Autodesk Inventor and am trying to figure out the video card issue also. From what I have read, Inventor is dependent upon surpport for Direct3D 10 - not OpenGL. Do consumer gaming cards support Direct3D 10 (or 9) as well as a true workstation video card? Is Direct3D 10 different than DirectX? I understand the basics of computers but have not kept up to date on the technical side. My son would like to be able to play games (he is a pretty hard core console gamer) as well as run Inventor etc. Thanks for helping!

    Keith

    DirectX is the full name of the API that includes Direct3D. All GPU's sold today are at least DirectX 10.1 complaint while the newest ones from ATi are DirectX 11.
  24. ^Yup. DirectX API includes Direct3D,DirectDraw,DirectSount,etc.

    Finished DLing & installing Inventor 2010 today, and I can say I hate the new Ribbon UI, but apart from that it runs stable on my i7 build on Win 7 x64.
  25. I guess I should apologize for some of the stress I caused. In 2004 I built some workstations, servers, and storage for a major company. The computers run 24/7 and as even the HP rep. said to me, during crunch times they are hammered. They transcode large numbers of huge files for hours at a time. The workstations HP's competitor sold to the company cost about 3 times as much and lag in both performance and reliability, enough that you don't have to run any benchmarks to see the difference, and this was true even when they were slightly newer then the ones I built. At any rate, I guess I get carried away, but someone did build the kind of computer that the committee here comes up with and it was really slow compared to the monsters I was building. However the point is that although a workstation is a totally different animal, you are not paying people to wait on their files and needing to transcode massive amounts of data to meet deadlines which will cost you tens of thousands of dollars if they are missed. In fact almost anything you build will work and you will think it is really fast.
  26. OK I think we have a final build gentlemen. And hot damn are the discounts adding up.

    Motherboard:
    Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5 - $268.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128362

    CPU + Cooler combo:
    Intel Core i7-920 Bloomfield 2.66GHz + Vigor Monsoon III LT Dual 120mm Fan - $306.98
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.296065

    GPU:
    PNY Quadro FX 1800 - $399.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133272

    RAM:
    OCZ Gold 12GB (6 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) - $310.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227422

    PSU:
    Corsair CMPSU-750TX 750W - $109.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

    Case:
    COOLER MASTER Centurion 5 CAC-T05-UW - $54.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119068

    HDD:
    Undecided, estimate $50

    Optical Drive:
    The one originally suggested actually comes with some firmware that gets it lots of bad reviews on newegg, so thats still undecided, estimate $30.

    Total - $1531.93 with $40 of mail in mail in rebates on top of that for a grand total of $1491.93!!!

    I must say I am rather proud that I can get a computer like this for under $1500. I didnt think I was going to be able to get the safely overclocked i7, more than 8gb ram, and my Quadro FX1800, for under my $1600 limit. This config has a total of $280 in discounts on it - 90 on the psu, 50 on the ram, 50 on the GPU, 30 on the mobo, $45 on the CPU/fan combo, and a free flash drive

    Much thanks to all who have helped... a final check-over would be much appreciated, and then I think the parts will be getting ordered tomorrow or wednesday!
  27. The original 750GB and 500GB WD drives were not good suggestions since they use old 250GB platter designs. The newer single 500GB platter drives are much faster. I usually recommend the Samsung F3 500GB drive, but it's currently out of stock at Newegg. The Seagate 7200.12 500GB drive is a good second option since it uses a single 500GB platter.

    Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST3500418AS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $54.99

    SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $54.99

    You absolutely have no need for anywhere near a 750W PSU. A quality 500W - 600W PSU is plenty for your system.

    CORSAIR CMPSU-550VX 550W $79.99 - $20 MIR

    CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX 650W $89.99 - $20 MIR.

    You could save quite a bit of money going with this motherboard:

    ASUS P6T SE LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $204.99 - $20 MIR
  28. shortstuff_mt said:
    The original 750GB and 500GB WD drives were not good suggestions since they use old 250GB platter designs. The newer single 500GB platter drives are much faster. I usually recommend the Samsung F3 500GB drive, but it's currently out of stock at Newegg. The Seagate 7200.12 500GB drive is a good second option since it uses a single 500GB platter.

    Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST3500418AS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $54.99

    SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive $54.99


    You absolutely have no need for anywhere near a 750W PSU. A quality 500W - 600W PSU is plenty for your system.

    CORSAIR CMPSU-550VX 550W $79.99 - $20 MIR

    CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX 650W $89.99 - $20 MIR.

    You could save quite a bit of money going with this motherboard:

    ASUS P6T SE LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $204.99 - $20 MIR



    Good looks on that HDD. And this way, later, when SSD prices come down I can use the SSD as my work drive and a second 500gb hd as redundant storage drives. Even better is that when I was looking at combo deals for that seagate, I found this:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.309441
    which is with the exact 550w supply you linked!

    I had read about the p6t all over the place but just never really looked at it. Now that I give it a glance I dont see whats better about the gigabyte so I dont see why to spend the extra money.

    You saved me quite a bit with those changes. Subtotal is now $1,372.92 after $60 of mail in rebates. Sweet!
  29. It's nice to have a win-win situation where you save a ton of money without sacrificing any performance. :)
  30. Hrmmm as I read more user reviews on the ASUS mobo, I think Im going back to the gigabyte. Too many stories of the board pooping out when overclocked. I want to take the i7 920 to about 3.6, I figure thats a pretty safe number.
  31. I hope you're not making that decision off of Newegg reviews. Those reviews are usually just noobs who can't figure out how to read the owners manual. I'm sure the P6T SE would be just fine. You could also step up to the regular P6T and still save a little money.

    ASUS P6T LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $239.99
  32. ^Agreed. DO NOT trust Newegg reviews. Most of the problems are caused by id1ot error. The P6T (in the hands of a learned individual) will be better or similar to the Gigabyte in OCing capability. All on has to do is just RTFM and spend a few hours (1-2) searching & reading, after all most of the info on the net are free! One just has to put some effort in to it.

    PS: One of the funniest things is that most noobs don't like DFI boards because they have too many BIOS options lol.
  33. *** in' dope and I couldn't have done this so smoothly without you.... But maybe I shouldnt jinx myself. *** could always go wrong putting it into the case or installing the OS that could leave me in tears lol
  34. A lady who is a self employed Architect ,she design the plans for building and send these to her customers.

    I would like to buying her a good PC what do you recomend me? my budget is up to £ 1500

    I need to buy monitor, keyboard,Ram,Processor and allthings she will need it

    Thanks
  35. would you give me the list of all things( input & out put)of Pc for her job and prices

    please
  36. Has anything changed significantly, in regards to motherboard, processor or RAM recommendations?

    I am in the process of gathering the parts to build my own machine and I too run CAD and BIM programs like AutoCAD and Revit.
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