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Taking old hardrive and putting it in somewhat new computer = BSOD

Last response: in Memory
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June 28, 2010 8:20:57 PM

Hello,

I have a 3 year old ACER computer. I used to use it as my own. I just recently built my own gaming rig, so I do not need it any longer. I decided to give it to my mom, since her computer is ancient. She said she needs to keep all her data she has, so I decided that I would just open up her ancient computer, take her HDD, and pop it in my old computer, and wahla, it would work. Guess not. Her hardrive is so old, it uses that long 20 pin (i think 20 maybe smaller or larger) connector that the optical disk drive uses. Its slightly different though because on her connector, it has one hole missing in the middle. Anyways, I tried connecting it, turned it on, and it brought me to the screen where I could select start windows normally, safe mode, and the other options. I chose to start it normally. I hit it, it loaded for a few seconds, flashed a blue screen for about half a second, then restarted. It just goes through the same process over and over again. What is wrong here? Is there any way to maybe buy a new HDD, and transfer the data from hers to the new one, so she saves all of her emails and documents? My old computer (the one im trying to give her) used to use Windows vista 32 bit, if that matters. It had an AMD chipset, used athlon I believe, her ancient one I believe used intel, that shouldnt matter though for the hardrive, righht? Oh by the way I cant boot into safe mode either the same thing happens
a b } Memory
June 28, 2010 8:29:45 PM

First, make sure (in your BIOS) that the system is not trying to boot from the old drive.

On the IDE ribbon cable you used, is the HD the only device on the cable? If it is, you should be fine. If there is a second device (like the optical drive), either the devices must be set to "cable select" or one must be the master and one the slave (sorry that sounds complicated).

I really think what you are seeing is the boot problem. Just make sure you are booting from the correct HD and you should be good to go.

Good luck!
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June 28, 2010 8:31:12 PM

COLGeek said:
First, make sure (in your BIOS) that the system is not trying to boot from the old drive.

On the IDE ribbon cable you used, is the HD the only device on the cable? If it is, you should be fine. If there is a second device (like the optical drive), either the devices must be set to "cable select" or one must be the master and one the slave (sorry that sounds complicated).

I really think what you are seeing is the boot problem. Just make sure you are booting from the correct HD and you should be good to go.

Good luck!


Nope, the only device on there is the HDD. I went into boot options, and selected the hard drive.
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a b } Memory
June 28, 2010 9:11:03 PM

OK, so you have the old HDD in the new PC. Right?

In that new PC, it is set to boot from the new PC's HDD. Right?

On the IDE ribbon cable, there should be a tab to only allow the cable to be attached one way. If not, you have to look at the cable and the connector on the HDD. Pin 1 and wire 1 (one wire on the ribbon cable will be a difference color than the others) must be connected.

Given this, you should be able to boot the new PC/HDD combo and "see" the old HDD.

Only if you are trying to boot off of the old HDD with the ATI vs. Intel chipset issue matter. Now if you trying to do that, you have a problem and the fix isn't simple.

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June 28, 2010 9:16:53 PM

well ya the hardrive used to run on my moms ancient intel. Im trying to put it in the new computer which runs an AMD.
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a b } Memory
June 28, 2010 10:34:40 PM

Now I understand. You aren't going to like the answer, but the only stable way to set that up is with a fresh Windows install on the new PC onto the old HDD. Trying to kludge the registry to work through the chipset differences is a pain and often fails anyway.

If you want to pull files off the old HDD first, either put into an external enclosure and transfer off the old HDD or connect the old HDD directly to the IDE port on another computer and pull the files off.

Bottom line, a new install is in your future.
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a b } Memory
June 28, 2010 11:42:53 PM

Nope, won't work. It has to do with how the registry is configured to use the original chipset. There are work-arounds, but they are rarely stable. Google on "change motherboard for windows xp installation" or words like that and you'll find some suggestions.

There is also an XP tool (I assume this is XP we are talking about) called sysprep that can be used to move installs from one PC to another, but you have to start from a stable computer first (like the old HDD in the old HDD).

You use sysprep to prepare the drive (puts into a "fresh" install state, clearing the hardware settings, etc) so you can move to the new PC. Works okay, but yoy have to follow the directions very closely. Google for sysprep as well.

These are not straight forward approaches. A clean install is the best long term solution.

I thought of another option as well. You could boot the system from a bootable linux CD (like Ubuntu) and use linux to move the files onto another media device if you have one. Once copied, you could then do the clean install.

Good luck. I know you are looking for something fast and easy. Not really a good way to do what you are asking to do.
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June 29, 2010 12:45:36 AM

COLGeek said:
Nope, won't work. It has to do with how the registry is configured to use the original chipset. There are work-arounds, but they are rarely stable. Google on "change motherboard for windows xp installation" or words like that and you'll find some suggestions.

There is also an XP tool (I assume this is XP we are talking about) called sysprep that can be used to move installs from one PC to another, but you have to start from a stable computer first (like the old HDD in the old HDD).

You use sysprep to prepare the drive (puts into a "fresh" install state, clearing the hardware settings, etc) so you can move to the new PC. Works okay, but yoy have to follow the directions very closely. Google for sysprep as well.

These are not straight forward approaches. A clean install is the best long term solution.

I thought of another option as well. You could boot the system from a bootable linux CD (like Ubuntu) and use linux to move the files onto another media device if you have one. Once copied, you could then do the clean install.

Good luck. I know you are looking for something fast and easy. Not really a good way to do what you are asking to do.



I bought a 2gb flash driver, gonna put the damn thing back together tomorrow, transfer all the important stuff onto there, and then let geeksquad deal with the rest. We dont have original XP disc. We pay them 130 dollars, and its guarenteed to work, one way or another, when we get it back. Thanks for the help though.
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a b } Memory
June 29, 2010 12:56:04 AM

May be worth your time and the avoided headache to do as you propose. Sorry there really isn't a better way to do what you wanted. Been there, done that, got the headache....
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