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Recommendations for RAID storage device

Tags:
  • Motherboards
  • NAS / RAID
  • Storage
  • Devices
Last response: in Motherboards
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June 29, 2010 6:40:14 PM

I am looking to build a NAS RAID storage array for our office for items that need to be accessible for archive purposes but do not need to be on our server. I am looking for a solution that would provide 1.5 to 2 Tb of storage in RAID 5 or RAID 6 for < $1000. Any recommendations on a good motherboard to base this system on?

More about : recommendations raid storage device

June 29, 2010 7:06:39 PM

I would not worry so much about the motherboard and instead use an add-on RAID card. This way if the motherboard dies, you can still pop the RAID card into another machine to access the data. If you are using the motherboards built-in RAID and it dies, then you have a lot of potential work trying to find a motherboard that will read the RAID set as-is. Chipsets on RAID cards are often more "stable" in regards to longevity in use.
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a c 236 V Motherboard
a c 82 G Storage
June 29, 2010 7:19:26 PM

nocheese said:
I would not worry so much about the motherboard and instead use an add-on RAID card. This way if the motherboard dies, you can still pop the RAID card into another machine to access the data. If you are using the motherboards built-in RAID and it dies, then you have a lot of potential work trying to find a motherboard that will read the RAID set as-is. Chipsets on RAID cards are often more "stable" in regards to longevity in use.

With the Intel Matrix Raid (ICHxR), you can easily move the raid to any other Intel motherboard as long as it also has an ICHxR chipset. However I'd simply buy a NAS and be done with it.
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June 29, 2010 8:03:24 PM

Any suggestions or experience with NAS? I am looking probably at either a D-Link 343 enclosure or Buffalo TeraStation ES NAS based on the price restriction.
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a c 236 V Motherboard
a c 82 G Storage
June 29, 2010 8:32:27 PM

The NAS that I'm familiar with are not in that price range. If possible, read professional reviews, but remember that you often get what you pay for. Unless you're not concerned by losing the data, make sure that the NAS is backed up on a regular basis.

Why not simply add more drives in a RAID5 array to the existing server?
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June 29, 2010 9:13:44 PM

This device is for storing AVI archives of our digital video. (1) It is redundant, since everything is also stored on optical media (DVDs) and is mostly to allow more convenient access. (2) I am considering a standalone device so that this NAS can be placed on the same switch as a video production equipment. Since a number of computers share a trunk line to the server this seemed like a practical way to meet our storage needs and minimize network congestion. With a NAS in the same physical space and on the same switch that traffic can remain within there instead of taking up bandwidth from other clients to the server.
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Best solution

a c 236 V Motherboard
a c 82 G Storage
June 29, 2010 9:24:53 PM

Then your solution makes a lot of sense. You only have to decide between a PC based solution and a NAS server. A PC could work if you went with RAID0+1, but RAID5 requires a controller unless write performance isn't important. RAID6 absolutely requires a controller or a NAS server. You should buy hard disks like Western Digital RE3 or RE4, Seagate ES, etc. Not because they're better, but because they're designed for RAID use.
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June 29, 2010 9:29:42 PM

Performance is important, so it sounds like a dedicated NAS server is the route to go. I am looking at the Buffalo TeraStation III series... it seems like a good balance of features, performance and cost.
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a c 236 V Motherboard
a c 82 G Storage
June 30, 2010 2:22:39 AM

Reviewers seem to agree that it's quite good.
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July 14, 2010 3:21:04 PM

Best answer selected by jeggen.
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