Q9300 overclock

Hello,

i have
ASUS P5G41T-M LX
Intel® Core™2 Quad Processor Q9300
GIGABYTE N56GOC-1GI

so my problem is i can overclock my cpu max 2993 ghz and 7.5 x 399 multiplier
but when i wanna more like 7.5 x 400 my pc froze .
in bios i have every voltage setting set to AUTO . but then i change voltage to maximum what can i set and i have the same resoult

so my question is can i have more than 2993 ghz or Q9300 have some max limit
and i cant change multiplier the max is 7.5
i thin the problem is my stock power suply 400w but i hope u guys can help me

thx a lot ( sry my eng. skill )
5 answers Last reply
More about q9300 overclock
  1. Quote:
    so my problem is i can overclock my cpu max 2993 ghz and 7.5 x 399 multiplier
    but when i wanna more like 7.5 x 400 my pc froze .

    Sounds like 399 is the max FSB you can get with that chip and board. That or the increase to the FSB is taking your memory past its maximum stable frequency and you're not adjusting it downward as you increase the FSB speed to maintain stability.

    Quote:
    in bios i have every voltage setting set to AUTO . but then i change voltage to maximum what can i set and i have the same resoult

    NEVER DO THAT! Too much voltage can literally destroy your chip. NEVER set it to the maximum allowed value. Look up the maximum safe value for your chip, and never exceed it.

    Quote:
    so my question is can i have more than 2993 ghz or Q9300 have some max limit
    and i cant change multiplier the max is 7.5

    7.5 is indeed the max multiplier for the Q9300, but the chip is capable of much higher overclocks than that. Either your motherboard is at fault, you got unlucky with the chip (not all chips are created equal) or you're not properly adjusting your memory's speed.

    Quote:
    i thin the problem is my stock power suply 400w

    Extremely unlikely, the power supply has almost nothing to do with overclocking stability. The motherboard will regulate the power going to the CPU.
  2. If by "stock" you mean a no name psu then yes that's definitely your problem, you should even be running a GTX 560 on that thing, plz get a higher quality model PSU as soon as possible.
  3. BLCK overclocking can only go so far on some motherboards. Agreed with above comments about the PSU; replace it with a (new) Antec, Corsair, or Seasonic branded PSU. I'd get an ~600w if I were you. It shouldn't limit your overclock too badly, but that wattage is low for a GTX 560, especially if you're overclocking your CPU.

    @Willard
    The PSU looks to be insufficient. It's wattage is probably not high enough. That might not be why the CPU isn't overclocking to where it should be and you might be corrct about the memory needing it's multiplier toned down, but that PSU does not seem adequate. Too low wattage and not a good brand-name PSU.

    If it's more than two of three years old, then it might have also degraded far from even the 400w that it's rated for and that's assuming that it could even hit 400w when it was new. PSUs degrade over time, low quality units degrade faster than high quality units, and pushing a PSU anywhere near its maximum rated wattage degrades it even faster, especially since some non-good brand PSUs can't even hit their rated wattage when they're new.
  4. well i my bios menu looks like this http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/6438/foto0103f.jpg

    i trying every thing -_- even test whitout GPU -_- .......

    i have 2 plans
    Plan A : buy a new PSU( Fortron AURUM 700W ) and Case ( Corsair 600TM Graphite ) and overclock my PC to max .......
    Plan B : buy this new PSU and case and buy a Asus Maximus 5 gene + some i5 or i7 .....

    looks like its gona be plan B ...

    well thx 4 help guys
  5. I suggest going for an i5 instead of an i7 if you go for the LGA 1155 socket platform. i7s are great for highly-threaded workloads, but they are hardly even marginally better than i5s for any workload that uses four or fewer threads and isn't extremely dependent on cache capacity to an extent where 8MB of L3 is much better than 6MB.

    However, if you want to replace, then if you could wait another year or so for Haswell and maybe AMD's next CPU line, you would probably be all the better for it.
Ask a new question

Read More

CPUs Overclocking