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PSU whines after Windows 7 Shutdown

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August 29, 2009 10:54:56 PM

The title pretty much explains it.

When I shutdown the computer from within Windows 7, my PSU makes a whining sound after the PC shutsdown. The only way to make the sound go away is to disconnect the power. The longest I have let the noise go was 6 hours to see if it would stop on its own, but all that happened is it got a little quieter.

I can boot into the ASUS "Express Gate" Linux based OS that is loaded onto the motherboard and when I shutdown the computer from that OS, there is no noise.

Otherwise I'm having no other issues. Any ideas about what is happening? Disconnecting the power every time I shutdown is getting old pretty fast.

-910 watt PC Power & Cooling PSU
-ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 MOBO
-i7 920

EDIT

When I disconnect the power to make the noise stop, I can plug the power back in and the noise does not come back. The only time I have been able to make the noise is when I shutdown the computer in Windows 7.
a c 2353 ) Power supply
a c 420 $ Windows 7
August 29, 2009 11:08:38 PM

I don't think it would be the os!
August 30, 2009 12:03:15 AM

I wouldn't think it's the OS either, except that I can only get the PSU to make the noise when I shutdown from Windows 7. The only way I could think of it being the OS is if it was going into some kind of standy-by or hibernate mode and still drawing a small amount of power rather than fully shutting down.

If it were something wrong with the PSU then I would suspect that it would make the noise while the computer was running, or was plugged in while the computer was shutdown.
Related resources
a b ) Power supply
a c 209 $ Windows 7
August 30, 2009 2:59:54 AM

Does the power light blink after you've shut the system down? If so, the computer is in "sleep" mode rather than being completely shut down.
a c 2353 ) Power supply
a c 420 $ Windows 7
August 30, 2009 2:23:12 PM

i agree with sminlal ,about the sleep mode deal!!!!!
August 30, 2009 7:33:25 PM

sminlal said:
Does the power light blink after you've shut the system down? If so, the computer is in "sleep" mode rather than being completely shut down.



The light is off and there is nothing to indicate that the PC is in sleep mode.

Also, if I put the computer in sleep mode instead of shutting down, then there is no noise.
a b ) Power supply
a c 209 $ Windows 7
August 31, 2009 2:26:57 AM

If you look in "Power Options" (Start -> search for "Power Options"), which option do you have selected? What are the settings for that option (click the "Change Plan Settings" to see what they are, and click the "Change Advanced Power Settings" on the next page to see the complete list).

Do you shut your system down by clicking the "Start" orb and then "Shutdown", or do you hit the power switch on the computer? If it's the power switch, then what's the "Power Buttons and Lid" configuration in the power options?
August 31, 2009 3:35:57 AM

Doesn't sound good and it has nothing to do with OS. Try to unplug the VGA power connector and see if the sound will remain. try to remove other connectors as well . if nothing works I am afraid that the psu is going to fail sooner or later because that sort of noise usually comes from the capacitors.
August 31, 2009 4:23:36 AM

Quote:
The title pretty much explains it.

When I shutdown the computer from within Windows 7, my PSU makes a whining sound after the PC shutsdown. The only way to make the sound go away is to disconnect the power. The longest I have let the noise go was 6 hours to see if it would stop on its own, but all that happened is it got a little quieter.

I can boot into the ASUS "Express Gate" Linux based OS that is loaded onto the motherboard and when I shutdown the computer from that OS, there is no noise.

Otherwise I'm having no other issues. Any ideas about what is happening? Disconnecting the power every time I shutdown is getting old pretty fast.

-910 watt PC Power & Cooling PSU
-ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 MOBO
-i7 920

EDIT

When I disconnect the power to make the noise stop, I can plug the power back in and the noise does not come back. The only time I have been able to make the noise is when I shutdown the computer in Windows 7.


Awww.... The poor PCP&C puppy misses its master....

Seriously, it is either one of your power option settings or you have a really strange copy of Win 7.
a c 144 ) Power supply
August 31, 2009 2:28:34 PM

Quote:
... because that sort of noise usually comes from the capacitors.

No. The caps will be silent - until they explode. The noise will be coming from one of transformers or coils inside the PSU.

I also think it has something to do with the power management.
August 31, 2009 11:06:06 PM

Quote:
My FW doesn't allow cookies from sites I don't trust... Could you just cut 'n paste the main point of the article?


I do not know what went wrong with the site, any way here you go:

Research Article
1/f noise of electrolytic capacitors as a reliability indicator
Alicja Konczakowska *
Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics, Technical University of Gdask, ul. G. Narutowicza 11/12, PL-80952 Gdask, Poland

email: Alicja Konczakowska (alkon@sunrise.pg.gda.pl)

*Correspondence to Alicja Konczakowska, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics, Technical University of Gdask, ul. G. Narutowicza 11/12, PL-80952 Gdask, Poland

Conference: 11th European Symposium The European and US Capacitor and Resistor Technology Symposium (CARTS) Europe '96,

Keywords
electrolytic capacitors • 1/f noise • reliability indicators


Abstract
The electrical noise of capacitors and the relationship between typical imperfections in capacitors and their excess noise are described. It was assumed that a noisy capacitor is a poor-quality one. Investigations were aimed at the determination of a correlation between the inherent noise of capacitors and their reliability (time to failure) and also at the determination of an indicator to predict reliability.
Investigations (noise measurements and reliability tests) were carried out on two samples of aluminium electrolytic capacitors. The method of reliability prediction for electrolytic capacitors based on their low-frequency noise is described. For reliability prediction the noise intensity G at a frequency of 2 Hz was used as a reliability indicator.
It was found that the evaluated correlation coefficients between the noise parameter G and the time to failure, t, are statistically significant. It is concluded that it is possible to predict the lifetime of aluminium electrolytic capacitors on the basis of their 1/f noise. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Received: 2 December 1997; Revised: 15 January 1998
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

August 31, 2009 11:52:23 PM

Quote:
I do not know what went wrong with the site, any way here you go:

Research Article
1/f noise of electrolytic capacitors as a reliability indicator
Alicja Konczakowska *
Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics, Technical University of Gdask, ul. G. Narutowicza 11/12, PL-80952 Gdask, Poland

email: Alicja Konczakowska (alkon@sunrise.pg.gda.pl)

*Correspondence to Alicja Konczakowska, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics, Technical University of Gdask, ul. G. Narutowicza 11/12, PL-80952 Gdask, Poland

Conference: 11th European Symposium The European and US Capacitor and Resistor Technology Symposium (CARTS) Europe '96,

Keywords
electrolytic capacitors • 1/f noise • reliability indicators


Abstract
The electrical noise of capacitors and the relationship between typical imperfections in capacitors and their excess noise are described. It was assumed that a noisy capacitor is a poor-quality one. Investigations were aimed at the determination of a correlation between the inherent noise of capacitors and their reliability (time to failure) and also at the determination of an indicator to predict reliability.
Investigations (noise measurements and reliability tests) were carried out on two samples of aluminium electrolytic capacitors. The method of reliability prediction for electrolytic capacitors based on their low-frequency noise is described. For reliability prediction the noise intensity G at a frequency of 2 Hz was used as a reliability indicator.
It was found that the evaluated correlation coefficients between the noise parameter G and the time to failure, t, are statistically significant. It is concluded that it is possible to predict the lifetime of aluminium electrolytic capacitors on the basis of their 1/f noise. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Received: 2 December 1997; Revised: 15 January 1998
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)


Thanks for that... From this abstract, it appears that the authors were trying to correlate electrical noise to capacitor failure in one specific class of capacitor. (aluminum electrolyte) Any good tech with access to a 'scope could tell you that a 'noisy' capacitor is not a good capacitor, and should be replaced, but this research attempts to quantify noise to time before failure. Note though, that the physical noise they were using was at 2 Hz... I doubt that the OP could hear 2 HZ... Maybe a whale could? I have heard large oil bath capacitors 'whine', but I think that was a built-in alarm function to tell me to run - quickly! :-)

I also tend to think that whatever 'noise' the OP was hearing probably comes from coils, but the main question to me at least is 'why'? And why in just win 7? Perhaps there will be an answer sometime.
a b ) Power supply
a b $ Windows 7
August 31, 2009 11:55:11 PM

Capacitors don’t generally make any noise although inductors do, the above reference to 1/f noise was electrical noise not audio noise.
a b ) Power supply
a b $ Windows 7
September 1, 2009 12:04:00 AM

I think that the noise is coming from the 5volts standby supply and is present only when its load current is at a certain level. To prove and maybe fix this try connecting a 10 ohm 2.5 watt resistor across the 5volt standby and ground. Or replace the power supply
September 1, 2009 2:22:02 AM

Quote:
Capacitors don’t generally make any noise although inductors do, the above reference to 1/f noise was electrical noise not audio noise.


Do you mean that "electrical noise" can not be heard?
a b $ Windows 7
September 1, 2009 2:46:02 AM

Under most circumstances, no, electrical "noise" cannot be heard, as it is not noise in the acoustic sense. If it were, it would be measured in decibels. Capacitors can explode, making a loud pop, or they can slowly expand, in which case they may produce a sizzling noise as the electrolyte boils and leaks out... but in the latter case, they rarely produce enough noise to be heard. This is why most people don't know they have leaky / bulged / bad capacitors until their system becomes unstable.

It's very odd that this power supply produces the noise in standby mode and not under power on. It's also odd that unplugging it and plugging it back in stops the noise. If you have another power supply, you should try it and see if the same thing happens.
September 1, 2009 2:46:36 AM

Quote:
Note though, that the physical noise they were using was at 2 Hz... I doubt that the OP could hear 2 HZ... Maybe a whale could? .


Yes, I am aware that humans can not hear 2hz , but the point is that: capacitors do make noise and the higher it goes the worse it means. Now the question is: Could that noise reach an audible frequencies?
September 1, 2009 3:02:24 AM

Quote:
Yes, I am aware that humans can not hear 2hz , but the point is that: capacitors do make noise and the higher it goes the worse it means. Now the question is: Could that noise reach an audible frequencies?


Obviously you didn't read my entire post... Let me refresh your eyes:

"Thanks for that... From this abstract, it appears that the authors were trying to correlate electrical noise to capacitor failure in one specific class of capacitor. (aluminum electrolyte) Any good tech with access to a 'scope could tell you that a 'noisy' capacitor is not a good capacitor, and should be replaced, but this research attempts to quantify noise to time before failure. Note though, that the physical noise they were using was at 2 Hz... I doubt that the OP could hear 2 HZ... Maybe a whale could? I have heard large oil bath capacitors 'whine', but I think that was a built-in alarm function to tell me to run - quickly! :-)

I also tend to think that whatever 'noise' the OP was hearing probably comes from coils, but the main question to me at least is 'why'? And why in just win 7? Perhaps there will be an answer sometime."

That said, I really don't think that any capacitor in a PSU or anywhere else inside a PC could produce a 'whine'. As Zoron said, they sure might give you a good scare when they go bad... Especially some of those in PSU's. Loud as a .38 going off. (sorry Zoron... I sort of paraphrased.)
September 1, 2009 4:08:02 AM

Quote:

That said, I really don't think that any capacitor in a PSU or anywhere else inside a PC could produce a 'whine'. As Zoron said, they sure might give you a good scare when they go bad... Especially some of those in PSU's. Loud as a .38 going off. (sorry Zoron... I sort of paraphrased.)

Now that is a direct answer. thanks and please excuse my slow pace, I just wanted to clear up my confusion.
September 1, 2009 4:46:38 AM

It's most likely a sleep state setting in the bios. An S state that windows is calling isn't completely powering down wheres the linux OS is. Disable any sleep state settings or change from s1 to s3, etc and see if anything changes.

Also, what happens when you hibernate the pc? That should do exactly the same thing as another OS shutting down.
September 1, 2009 4:59:00 AM

This is by no means a solution to the question, but I also have a similar problem with Windows 7 (ver. 7077), in that when I shutdown my computer for some strange reason the PSU stays on and the Case fans continue to spin (and light up), yet everything else (CPU, RAM, HDDs & Video) all power down to off state.

I use a P965 chipset motherboard (Asus P5B-E) which doesn't exhibit this behavior with any other OS that I've tried on my PC. Currently I have it triple booting XP, XP 64-bit, Win7 as well as having used a number of different flavours of Linux on Live CDs and it is only Win7 that doesn't "shutdown" the PC correctly.

Rather than unplugging the power supply all I do is hold the power button until the PSU powers down. This is after selecting shutdown from the Start "orb". Have never been able to figure out though how to let MS know about this. I intend to "switch" to RC1 in the next week or so (been too lazy to do it so far - this version hasn't started doing the 2 hour shutdowns yet but probably will very soon), so it will be interesting to see whether that fixes the problem.
September 1, 2009 10:31:16 AM

Looks like it has something to do with some Asus MB models, did you check for a bios update?
a c 233 $ Windows 7
September 1, 2009 12:27:37 PM

I have Win7 Ultimate x64 retail (technet subscription). :)  Win7 has much deeper sleep states than previous versions of windows. There are a lot of settings under the different power plan options. Anyhow, I just wanted to note that when my mobo is set to S3 sleep state and win7 goes to sleep, which I do believe is the default power plan, my system goes into a deep sleep. It appears to be turned off. Even the power led is off, not blinking, and the monitor's led shows off, not sleep. Of course, tapping the keyboard brings it back to life.

When your psu is making a noise, have you tried hitting a key on the keyboard to see if it wakes from sleep? Also, like others have said, you can alter the function of the shutdown button. Make sure it is set to actually shut down the system, not put it to sleep.

My mobo is a GA-EP45-UD3R v1.1 running the F9 bios.
September 2, 2009 1:40:05 AM

Quote:
I have Win7 Ultimate x64 retail (technet subscription). :)  Win7 has much deeper sleep states than previous versions of windows. There are a lot of settings under the different power plan options. Anyhow, I just wanted to note that when my mobo is set to S3 sleep state and win7 goes to sleep, which I do believe is the default power plan, my system goes into a deep sleep. It appears to be turned off. Even the power led is off, not blinking, and the monitor's led shows off, not sleep. Of course, tapping the keyboard brings it back to life.

When your psu is making a noise, have you tried hitting a key on the keyboard to see if it wakes from sleep? Also, like others have said, you can alter the function of the shutdown button. Make sure it is set to actually shut down the system, not put it to sleep.

My mobo is a GA-EP45-UD3R v1.1 running the F9 bios.



The PC does not wake up after using the keyboard or mouse whenever the PSU is whining. However, I am having issues waking from sleep mode and after reading a few things about my current BIOS version there are some issues with waking from sleep in Windows 7 64-bit. It was a long day at work and I have another long day tomorrow, so no time to update the BIOS tonight but I'll try it tomorrow evening and see what happens.

Now to find my old floppy drive...
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
a b $ Windows 7
November 11, 2009 7:37:12 AM

I have the same problem.
I have a Asus p5k motherboard, never had problems with vista.
Two weeks ago i started to work with windows 7.
When I shut down my pc, everything stops except indeed the power supply.
No problems with sleep mode however...
I have to push the power button for a few seconds until the power goes down...
Probably a bug...
a b $ Windows 7
November 11, 2009 9:46:21 AM

i recon this is to do with the PSU running a cooling down cycle then eventually stops, I have had this feature with Hyper psu's before, the OS does not have direct control over the PSU only the bios!
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
a b $ Windows 7
November 12, 2009 3:47:45 PM

my pc is 2 years old now, 2 years no problem with vista.
upgraded to windows 7 two weeks ago and since then the problem occurs...
September 30, 2010 8:57:16 AM

sounds like on/off charge to me.

as for the operating system....got me stumped.
a b ) Power supply
a b $ Windows 7
September 30, 2010 10:26:16 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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