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I7 core 920 vs i7 core 860

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February 24, 2010 1:14:48 PM

Hello,
I need to decide between I7 920 and I7 860.It will be mostly used for 3Dmax ' Photoshop, rendering..
(triple channel or dual)

help pls

thank you all

More about : core 920 core 860

February 26, 2010 2:18:24 AM

I'd go for the i7 920. It's provides more value for your money IMO, while providing the same number of threads for data processing. Not sure though if Photoshop is multi-thread friendly though...
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February 28, 2010 12:37:57 AM

The i7 920 being forced to use the LGA1366 socket makes your maching very future-proof as the socket will definitely be here to stay for a while. The Triple channel RAM might also be of use during rendering. Since you are doing work on the machine, overclocking isn't recommended because of stability issues so the best OC'ing of the 860 is a moot point.

However like r_manic has said, I'm not sure either if photoshop is multi-thread friendly, in that case, the Turboboost for the 860 is a plus point for it. Increasing by 5x133MHz when just running on 2 cores and 6x133MHz on a single core could greatly help in your work.

That being said you might want to look at pricing overall. I suppose that you would be using a single powerful workstation graphics card rather than CrossFire or SLI. In that case the PCI-E lanes of 32 on the X58 vs 24 on the P55 is not an issue. The LGA1156 socket is the cheaper platform to adopt though.
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February 28, 2010 7:11:35 AM

We've had similar questions recently. I did quite a bit of research last November and December for my own build. The Intel Core i7 860 has a very slight advantage with mainstream professional graphics applications. The advantage is so slight you probably will not notice it. It might be noticeable during large scale, complicated rendering processes.

If you will also be overclocking and playing games, then go for the Intel Core i7 920. If not, then go for the 860.
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March 2, 2010 12:16:39 AM

mephiston1 said:


However like r_manic has said, I'm not sure either if photoshop is multi-thread friendly, in that case, the Turboboost for the 860 is a plus point for it. Increasing by 5x133MHz when just running on 2 cores and 6x133MHz on a single core could greatly help in your work.





Hold it!!! mephiston........you said "However like r_manic has said,

I'm not sure either if photoshop is multi-thread friendly, in that case, the Turboboost for the 860 is a plus point for it."

But I'm unclear what that means, In what case? Not being sure? Or photoshop is not multi-thread friendly? Or more clearly asked; If PS is not multi-thread friendly then the Turboboost for the 860 is better? Could you say why? I too am a PS user and am currently looking for the best of the i7 cores for this purpose. My main purpose is in rendering hyper-filtered images. I'm currently using an 8 yr old P4 dual core 3GHz and it takes minutes. I want speed of processing. Thank you.

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March 2, 2010 12:30:46 AM

mephiston1 said:
The i7 920 being forced to use the LGA1366 socket makes your maching very future-proof as the socket will definitely be here to stay for a while. The Triple channel RAM might also be of use during rendering. Since you are doing work on the machine, overclocking isn't recommended because of stability issues so the best OC'ing of the 860 is a moot point.

However like r_manic has said, I'm not sure either if photoshop is multi-thread friendly, in that case, the Turboboost for the 860 is a plus point for it. Increasing by 5x133MHz when just running on 2 cores and 6x133MHz on a single core could greatly help in your work.

That being said you might want to look at pricing overall. I suppose that you would be using a single powerful workstation graphics card rather than CrossFire or SLI. In that case the PCI-E lanes of 32 on the X58 vs 24 on the P55 is not an issue. The LGA1156 socket is the cheaper platform to adopt though.


Neither triple channel nor PCE 16 vs. 8 make a noticeable difference. I would personally go with the 860 if I am strapped for cash. On the other end of the spectrum you have the 1366 socket that is supposedly more 'future proof' but 'future proof' socket is going to cost you a lot more $$$ to keep current. I have no idea how long the 1156 socket is going to last seeing as how Intel keeps adding socket types.
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March 2, 2010 12:42:50 AM

Core i7 860 2.8GHz 8M LGA1156 Retail $325 cpu-ci7-860-1156
Core i7 920 2.66GHz 8M LGA1366 Retail $315 cpu-ci7-920-1356

Am I mistaken or is the i7-920 1366 not triple channel? If it is then the cost diff is insignificant.
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March 6, 2010 2:42:40 PM

gofunky said:
Hello,
I need to decide between I7 920 and I7 860.It will be mostly used for 3Dmax ' Photoshop, rendering..
(triple channel or dual)

help pls

thank you all


Unless you're really rendering or Photoshopping at the professional level, either CPU will do just fine. The i7-920 has a higher memory bandwidth (~25 GB/sec) over the i7-860 (~21 GB/sec), but as JohnnyLucky pointed out, the i7-860 beats the 920 in most benchmarks, so go figure.

In terms of the LGA 1366 socket providing future-proofing, IMHO that's a big fat red herring: only the highest-end folks are going to buy a sparkling new quad-core processor, only to replace it with a six-core proc in a year or two... right?? These i7 systems are *fast*. In three or four years, trust me, they'll have some new stuff like the "i9" or "USB 4" etc, with a new socket to go along. Just let history be your guide and look at what's on the junk heap of computing: IDE, USB 1 (and now 2), AGP, classic PCI, etc, not to mention the advances in energy efficiency of late.

The LGA 1366 boards (for i7-920) *are* more expensive, and there's more of a selection for 1156 (i7-860) mobos. I wrote a lot of this up in a summary article ("Choosing a new CPU: i7-920 vs. i7-860"), check it out if you like. FWIW, MicroCenter has what is by far the best deal on both processors ($200-$230 currently) -- the only catch is in-store pickup only I believe. Put the extra $$$ you save into getting a faster HD or better graphics card, where you'll actually notice the difference.

http://computingkeith.wordpress.com/2010/02/10/choosing...
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