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Add floppy drive on new build ?

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July 4, 2010 1:07:45 PM

Getting ready to start a new build (noob) stripped the old case down,saved the floppy drive & panel switches,led's & speaker for bread boarding (good idea,breadboard first ?) This is the Mobo I'll be using http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=... OS will be W7. Should I install the old floppy drive also as I think I may like to backup the bios, or can this be done on say a USB drive ?

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a c 235 V Motherboard
July 4, 2010 1:29:34 PM

breadboaring is a good option to do. I typically don't breadboard on my builds but many people do, so it is more of a personal choice.

You can install a floppy drive but I don't see the need to, as you mentioned, this can be done with a USB drive.

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a c 177 V Motherboard
July 4, 2010 1:33:22 PM

Almost everything that can be done with a floppy, can also be done with a USB stick - but with more difficulty, added steps, and the ever-present possibility of getting a simply incompatible USB device. Might want to read the Floppy Drives section of the 'sticky', a bit past half-way down...

Might also want to read my post here, regarding 'breadboarding'...
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July 4, 2010 2:24:05 PM

Great info bilbat ! Bread boarding looks fun, plus I will be practicing good cable management at final assembly in case, would be nice not to have to remove anything after the fact.

I'll go ahead and install the floppy drive, as you point out everything defaults to a floppy drive, easy and problem free are my goals :) 

Now do you have a link or tutorial to create a bootable gigabyte bios back up, I would also like to test the floppy drive, its old and never used but was very clean inside.

Thanks in advance, I'd be lost without the forum !!!
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Best solution

a c 177 V Motherboard
July 4, 2010 3:23:10 PM

To test the drive: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', uncheck 'Quick Format', and it should test itself as it formats (can, however, also be 'sent awry' by a bad disk...)

To make a bootable BIOS flasher: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', and check "Create an MS-DOS startup disk'; when finished, double-click to open the disk, and erase everything but: COMMAND.COM, IO.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS (you'll need the room). (...oops - dawns on me - in the 'View' tab of 'Folder Options' in the Control Panel, you will need to have selected 'Show hidden files, folders and drives', and unchecked 'Hide protected operating system files', to even be able to see these files...)

Download your BIOS here... Place the downloaded file, 'motherboard_bios_ga-p55m-ud2_f11.exe' somewhere you can 'keep track of it'. Double-click on it, and it will 'self-extract' to three files:
autoexec.bat
p55mud2.f11 (the actual BIOS)
&
FLASHSPI.EXE...

Copy these three files to the previously created 'boot floppy', change your BIOS boot order to put the floppy before the hard drive, and you should be ready to boot/flash!

...all the autoexec.bat file, which runs automatically when the floppy is booted, contains is one line:
flashspi p55mud2.f11
this 'launches' the BIOS flasher, and tells it what BIOS file to flash - all there is to it!
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July 4, 2010 4:26:27 PM

bilbat said:
To test the drive: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', uncheck 'Quick Format', and it should test itself as it formats (can, however, also be 'sent awry' by a bad disk...)

To make a bootable BIOS flasher: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', and check "Create an MS-DOS startup disk'; when finished, double-click to open the disk, and erase everything but: COMMAND.COM, IO.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS (you'll need the room). (...oops - dawns on me - in the 'View' tab of 'Folder Options' in the Control Panel, you will need to have selected 'Show hidden files, folders and drives', and unchecked 'Hide protected operating system files', to even be able to see these files...)

Download your BIOS here... Place the downloaded file, 'motherboard_bios_ga-p55m-ud2_f11.exe' somewhere you can 'keep track of it'. Double-click on it, and it will 'self-extract' to three files:
autoexec.bat
p55mud2.f11 (the actual BIOS)
&
FLASHSPI.EXE...

Copy these three files to the previously created 'boot floppy', change your BIOS boot order to put the floppy before the hard drive, and you should be ready to boot/flash!

...all the autoexec.bat file, which runs automatically when the floppy is booted, contains is one line:
flashspi p55mud2.f11
this 'launches' the BIOS flasher, and tells it what BIOS file to flash - all there is to it!


Thanks bilbat ! I REALLY enjoy reading reading your posts !!!
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July 4, 2010 4:34:02 PM

bilbat said:
To test the drive: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', uncheck 'Quick Format', and it should test itself as it formats (can, however, also be 'sent awry' by a bad disk...)

To make a bootable BIOS flasher: insert a floppy, and right-click the drive in My Computer; select 'format', and check "Create an MS-DOS startup disk'; when finished, double-click to open the disk, and erase everything but: COMMAND.COM, IO.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS (you'll need the room). (...oops - dawns on me - in the 'View' tab of 'Folder Options' in the Control Panel, you will need to have selected 'Show hidden files, folders and drives', and unchecked 'Hide protected operating system files', to even be able to see these files...)

Download your BIOS here... Place the downloaded file, 'motherboard_bios_ga-p55m-ud2_f11.exe' somewhere you can 'keep track of it'. Double-click on it, and it will 'self-extract' to three files:
autoexec.bat
p55mud2.f11 (the actual BIOS)
&
FLASHSPI.EXE...

Copy these three files to the previously created 'boot floppy', change your BIOS boot order to put the floppy before the hard drive, and you should be ready to boot/flash!

...all the autoexec.bat file, which runs automatically when the floppy is booted, contains is one line:
flashspi p55mud2.f11
this 'launches' the BIOS flasher, and tells it what BIOS file to flash - all there is to it!

So the F11 is a new flash or the back up ?
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July 4, 2010 4:56:50 PM

OK My bad, I see the F11 is the most recent flash, so on a new BIOS flash are the newest drivers installed also ? Sorry for the NOOB questions , just trying to get it right.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
July 4, 2010 5:12:34 PM

Nope - the drivers are best taken from the CD that shipped with your board. There sometimes are newer drivers available on GB's website, but I always maintain you are better off installing from the CD, as the installer is 'sequenced'. Some drivers must be installed, before the hardware for others can be 'seen', by both the board and the OS - for example, the chipset drivers have to be in before the LAN chip drivers can be installed, as (if you look at the block diagram on page eight of your manual) the LAN chip is 'attached' to the PCIe bus, which is a feature of the chipset... Once you have installed the OS, and done the 'sequenced' install of the basic driver set, the OS' update feature will take care of the rest - it will install any newer drivers it considers 'necessary', and you are then free to install any others that you'd like - I am in the habit of installing all the RealTek drivers directly from RealTek, and never use the GBs...
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July 4, 2010 5:30:01 PM

bilbat said:
Nope - the drivers are best taken from the CD that shipped with your board. There sometimes are newer drivers available on GB's website, but I always maintain you are better off installing from the CD, as the installer is 'sequenced'. Some drivers must be installed, before the hardware for others can be 'seen', by both the board and the OS - for example, the chipset drivers have to be in before the LAN chip drivers can be installed, as (if you look at the block diagram on page eight of your manual) the LAN chip is 'attached' to the PCIe bus, which is a feature of the chipset... Once you have installed the OS, and done the 'sequenced' install of the basic driver set, the OS' update feature will take care of the rest - it will install any newer drivers it considers 'necessary', and you are then free to install any others that you'd like - I am in the habit of installing all the RealTek drivers directly from RealTek, and never use the GBs...

Thanks again bilbat ! The RealTek driver was my concern as I will be using onboard sound . Have a GREAT 4th and again thanks for all your help !
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July 5, 2010 8:38:29 PM

Best answer selected by RandyG.
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