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Core i5 + HD5770: What power supply?

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December 17, 2009 5:36:16 PM

Hi!
I'm planning on building a new system based on a core i5 and stumbled on a few doubts. So far my setup is

Processor: Intel Core i5 750
Motherboard: Asus P7P55D
Memory: 2x2Gb GsKill Ripjaws 1600 Mhz CL9
Graphic: Asus ATI HD5770 1Gb GDDR5
Storage: 2x1Tb Samsung Spinpoint F3 (RAID 0)
Optical drive: Bluray writer to be determined
Monitor: 24 inch 1920x1200

I'm having problems choosing the power supply... I don't want to overclock (so I guess the low end memory should be enough), and the system should be silent and energy efficient.

I'm also in doubt about the case. I'm pressured to choose a Asus TA 211 or something similar in esthetics ( (wife issues). Do you think it could work with this system?

Thanks for your help!
December 17, 2009 5:46:17 PM

What kind of budget are you looking at working with? With that information we should be able to pick you out a case and a PSU. Any quality 550W PSU will be able to handle that system though, unless you want to enter the realm of XFire, then you should go somewhere around 750W. As for the case, I would not recommend the Asus TA 211 as it has fairly poor airflow (only 1 fan). Look for something with 2 or more 120mm fans and that should do the job nicely. Just FYI, newegg has a sale on a bunch of Antec PSUs and cases at the moment that you might want to check out.
December 17, 2009 6:22:41 PM

I'm not sure what the deal is with the GsKill RAM, but I would recommend Crucial, Corsair or Kingston RAM (My personal favourite being the Kingston HyperX RAM).

If you want a silent PC, I'd suggest a passively cooled GPU - Club3D apparently does a passively cooled 5770, although that'd get a bit toasty.

For power, I don't think you need a massive PSU. I'd recommend the Nexus Value 430W PSU, which is fan cooled but absolutely silent. It's one of SPCRs favourite PSUs, and I'll swear by it myself as I've got one in my PC right now.

As for the case, I'd recommend something like a CoolerMaster Elite 330 or 360, Thermaltake WingRS 201 or Antec 300, depending on your budget (and your wife's tastes)

Hope this helps :) 
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December 17, 2009 6:36:53 PM

IMHO, it's always a mistake to use a PSU that's "just big enough". Instead, I believe a larger, rather than smaller PSU is the cheapest insurance for all your components that you will ever buy. Buy the highest wattage quality PSU you can afford. The bigger it is the more likely you can use it on your next build.
December 17, 2009 6:40:03 PM

Quality should be right up there with wattage/amperage though. I'd much rather have a quality 500W than a no-name 700W.
December 17, 2009 6:47:48 PM

According to the eXtreme Power Calculator (I'm not sure if many people have heard of it or not), the OPs system takes comes out at around 318W (assuming you're using a quality PSU, of course). The Nexus should more than easily handle this, and it has an efficiency of ~82.3% around this level of utilisation according to SPCR.

Admittedly it's not going to power a 5970 with an i7-920 or higher, but for something like this and anything roughly equivalent in the future I would have thought it'd be more than adequate.

EDIT: Link fixed.
December 17, 2009 6:52:55 PM

I've never heard of that PSU, but if SPCR thinks it is great, I'm inclined to think it is a good choice. And yes, a good 430W PSU will power that computer for years with no issue.
December 17, 2009 6:53:00 PM

Apparently your link is broken, but in general I don't use a a power calculator just because every one I use is different than the last one, so it's hard to tell if any of them are actually giving the correct power output.
December 17, 2009 10:14:32 PM

mavanhel said:
What kind of budget are you looking at working with? With that information we should be able to pick you out a case and a PSU. Any quality 550W PSU will be able to handle that system though, unless you want to enter the realm of XFire, then you should go somewhere around 750W. As for the case, I would not recommend the Asus TA 211 as it has fairly poor airflow (only 1 fan). Look for something with 2 or more 120mm fans and that should do the job nicely. Just FYI, newegg has a sale on a bunch of Antec PSUs and cases at the moment that you might want to check out.


I'm not too worried about the budget, I just don't want it to get extremely expensive. The other problem is that i'm in europe and the prices differ from the USA, so I guess I won't be able to get as much value for money as you would...
The bottom line is that I want a power supply that manages to power this system and maybe a future processor upgrade, being efficient and not the most expensive out there.
December 17, 2009 10:19:23 PM

The general rule of thumb is a high quality 500 to 550 watt power supply with sufficient current (amps) on the +12 volt rail(s) can easily power a system with any single video card made. A high quality 700 to 750 watt power supply with sufficient current (amps) on the +12 volt rail(s) can power a system with two video cards operating in dual mode. There are a few exceptions like the new ATI Radeon HD 5XXX series cards which use less power due to their energy efficiency.

A high quality 500 to 550 watt psu will have a +12 volt rail rated at 40 amps. A high quality 700 to 750 watt psu will have a +12 volt rail rated at 60 amps.

In addition the power supply should be at least 80+ Bronze certified for energy efficiency. There are some models available which have achieved 80+ Silver and 80+ Gold Certifications.

Before purchasing a new psu you will need to decide whether you will eventually have a pc with one or two video cards.

Here are the ATI recommended power supply requirements for the new ATI Radeon HD 5770 and 5750 video cards:


450 Watt or greater power supply with one 75 watt, 6-pin, PCI Express® power connector

600 Watt or greater power supply with two 75 watt, 6-pin, PCI Express® power connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode

The recommendations are for an entire pc system. Manufacturers overestimate the requirements because they know there are people who insist on buy low budget, low quality, psu's of questionable performance and value.


Technical review:

http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3658

Power consumption, temperature, and noise levels are very encouraging.


Corsair, PC Power & Cooling, and Seasonic are some of the brands that have a reputation for high quality power supplies that consistently earn high marks in technical reviews. They are reliable, stable, and come with a 5 year warranty. Some of the newer models come with a 7 year warranty. Lately we've been seeing a few other brands offering some high quality units. An example would be the Antec Earthwatts series which is a major improvement over Antec’s older psu’s like the Basiq series.
December 17, 2009 10:29:04 PM

brutalspoon said:
I'm not sure what the deal is with the GsKill RAM, but I would recommend Crucial, Corsair or Kingston RAM (My personal favourite being the Kingston HyperX RAM).

If you want a silent PC, I'd suggest a passively cooled GPU - Club3D apparently does a passively cooled 5770, although that'd get a bit toasty.

For power, I don't think you need a massive PSU. I'd recommend the Nexus Value 430W PSU, which is fan cooled but absolutely silent. It's one of SPCRs favourite PSUs, and I'll swear by it myself as I've got one in my PC right now.

As for the case, I'd recommend something like a CoolerMaster Elite 330 or 360, Thermaltake WingRS 201 or Antec 300, depending on your budget (and your wife's tastes)

Hope this helps :) 


It's a great help! Do you think the Nexus 430W could manage a future CPU upgrade (I'm planning this system to be upgradeable to a top core i7 in a few years)?
As for the case I'll try to convince my wife :)  I think I may be able to get her to approve a NOX Coolbay. What do you think?
December 18, 2009 12:10:17 AM

If you are sure you will only use one ATI Radeon HD 5770 video card in your system, then the high quality Corsair VX450 with a single large +12 volt rail rated at 33 amps would be an appropriate choice:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Here are links to technical reviews:

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article751-page1.html

http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/540

http://www.bjorn3d.com/read.php?cID=1160

If you are going to overclock an Intel Core i7 920 and upgrade the video card, then the Corsair VX550 with a single large +12 volt rail rated at 41 amps would be more appropriate. It is quite capable of powering a system equipped with any single video made:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
!