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Final Build - Noob Alert. Thoughts?

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February 25, 2010 7:18:44 PM

(my apologies if this is not in a good spot - 1st post)

I've been working this build for a whlie and finally got it in my price range. I want a powerful compt to run any new game without costing a fortune. I think this is the build. Any thoughts? The price is $1472.00

Case ( NZXT Tempest EVO Gaming Tower Case - Black )
Processor ( Intel® Core™ i7 920 Processor (4x 2.66GHz/8MB L3 Cache) )
Processor Cooling ( [Free Upgrade] Liquid CPU Cooling System w/ 120mm Radiator [SOCKET-1366] )
Memory ( 6 GB [2 GB X3] DDR3-1333 Triple Memory Module - Corsair or Major Brand ** Free Upgrade to DDR3-1600 ** )
Video Card ( ATI Radeon HD 5870 - 1GB - Single Card )
Motherboard ( ASUS P6T SE -- Intel X58 Chipset CrossFire Supported w/8-ch HD Audio, Triple-Channel DDR3, Gb LAN, S-ATA Raid, USB 2.0, 3 PCI-E MB )
Power Supply ( 800 Watt -- Power Supply - SLI Ready )
Primary Hard Drive ( 500 GB HARD DRIVE -- 16M Cache, 7200 RPM, 3.0Gb/s - Single Drive )
Optical Drive ( 22X Dual Format/Double Layer DVD±R/±RW + CD-R/RW Drive - Black )
Sound Card ( 3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard )
Network Card ( Onboard LAN Network (Gb or 10/100) )
Operating System ( Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium + [Free 60-Day !!!] Microsoft Office 2007(Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, Access ....) - 64-Bit )
Wireless Network Adapter ( Zonet ZEW2545 802.11n 130Mbps Wireless USB Adapter )
a c 133 à CPUs
February 25, 2010 7:26:37 PM

Sounds like a pre-built. You can do a lot better on price and/or components if you are willing to build it yourself.
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February 25, 2010 7:31:28 PM

Yeah it's through IBuypower. I've never built a comp before but I've been trying to price off of pricwatch and newegg. Seems like the price is about the same at the end. Maybe i'm not shopping hard enough?

What about the build itself though? Is it going to be a solid comp for the next couple of years?
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February 25, 2010 7:35:51 PM

Looks fairly solid to me. Wish I knew more about the PSU but I tend to care more about that then most people.

Also betting thats one of those self contained liquid cooling set ups. Big air will generally do better then little water but as a free upgrade can't complain.

If you don't feel comfortable building your own that system should easily accomplish your gaming needs for the next couple of years.
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February 25, 2010 7:37:46 PM

Thanks for the reply. Much appreciated.
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a c 133 à CPUs
February 25, 2010 7:42:12 PM

Looks good to me pretty good price for a prebuilt you would only be saveing a little building it yourself.
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a c 133 à CPUs
February 25, 2010 7:43:41 PM

Yeah, I'd worry about the PSU also. You want one with full range active PFC (no little voltage switch) and 80+ certification. Unless you anticipate adding a second HD5870 for Crossfire, you can cut the size of that PSU down to 500W-550W.
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2010 8:00:58 PM

No monitor? For less than your $1472 budget, you should be able to build a better system and include at least a 24" monitor. 800 watt PSU what brand?
And only one 500 Gig Hard Drive?
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February 25, 2010 8:07:28 PM

already have a monitor and a spare hard drive laying around.

That in mind, I think i better start looking at building instead.

It doesn't even say what brand on the PSU - LOL. that should be a warning I guess.
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2010 8:16:10 PM

Building is cool, fun, and you'll learn a ton. Not to mention the feeling of accomplishment when you get that first post. :) 

You'll also know EXACTLY what is going into your machine. (No mystery psus hehe)
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2010 9:42:13 PM

+1 for building your own.

Lots of experience gained, lots of fun to do and you can fully optimise your setup to exactly what you want.

Usually cheaper too, or at the very least more bang for the same money.

Shop around multiple suppliers though, weighing up rebates and shipping costs, to get the best prices - rarely will one place do it all.
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a b à CPUs
February 25, 2010 9:51:04 PM

Be sure to check Newegg's DIY combo specials too.
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a c 207 à CPUs
February 25, 2010 9:59:00 PM

I'd be concerned about.....

1. A free cooling system whose components are not specified.

2. Memory for which CAS # and model number is not specified

3. Video Card whose manufacturer is not specified.

4. Hard drive whose manufacturer and model number is not specified

5. PSU whose manufacturer and model number is not specified

6. Optical drive whose manufacturer and model number is not specified



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February 25, 2010 10:24:34 PM

yea build your own at least you will know what you have....

"free upgrade from 1333 to 1600"? so they just set the speed to 1600 and called it an upgrade? lol that is funny now that is marketing tactics right there
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February 28, 2010 12:43:57 AM

@darkjuggalo2000: yeah! agree with the amusing way they can market it. If that's the case I can give you cheap DDR3-1066 sticks and "upgrade" it to DDR3-2000. What happens after the initial power on is not covered under warranty. =D

Anyway americanritual, what everyone is saying about the PSU is a real important point. Those are high end parts and you need to be sure that your PSU can take it. PSU is not all about the wattage it's churning out but also how stable the voltages are along the rails. Electricity is never constant but the best manufacturers try to keep the fluctuation as little as possible. High fluctuations between voltages i.e 3.1v -3.5v for your 3.3v rail (extreme yes) could severely reduce the lifespan of your parts. Having just bought a MSI 5870 myself, I can tell you that the graphics card is a beast and you really want the security a quality PSU provides you.
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February 28, 2010 1:05:52 AM

CyberPower will save you an additional $30 for the exact same system. I looked at those also and decided that a personal build would assure quality parts were used. Here is the Gaming Rig I plan to build in the next couple of weeks (finally decided all the specs today with the help of a few regs here). Here is the discussion it may help you with a decision or two also.

All Parts and Prices are from Newegg
DVD Sony 24x (not a blue ray so who cares lol) $23.99
Case Thermaltake Element G $119.99
GPU Sapphire Toxic HD5850 $349.99
PSU Antec 650w $74.99
RAM G. Skill 4GB $119.99
MoBo GIGABYTE GA-P55A-UD4P $184.99
CPU Intel Core i5-750 $194.99
OS Windows 7 64bit (Pray for stability) $104.99
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 $34.99
HDD Samsung SpinPoint F3 1TB
another $10.00 for thermal paste

Total Cost of Build $1309.00 + Shipping ($40)
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February 28, 2010 1:08:20 AM

Look on newegg for the bundles that give you Motherboard, Processor, Video Card and Memory. If you are uncomfortable choosing your own parts, that's a good place to start.
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!