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How was would it be to get this i7 3770k overclock configuration?

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June 21, 2012 11:32:16 AM

Currently with turbo boost it will do 39x (3900mhz) with one core active, 39x with two active, 38x with three active and 37x with four active.

I like the idea of turbo boost and was thinking of a medium overclock, as long as it's safe and stable, of 500mhz in the same configuration. So 44x, 44x, 43x, 42x. So basically, at most times it'll run at 4200ghz in multi core applications but in single core applications it'll go up to 4400ghz. I don't want any crashes or high temps. I've tried the intel extreme tuning test stress test with all 4 at 44x and temps were around 65-70 with like 73 max. Will these kinds of temps lower my CPU's lifespan at all?

The vcore I'd like to leave stock, which is around 1.2
June 21, 2012 12:52:31 PM

The vcore changes when your CPU is pushing more/less. i.e. I ran Prime95 on all cores (w/ hyperthreading so 8) and the CPU ran at 3.7Ghz for 12 hours where the vcore was 1.04v (if i remember correctly)...then when i stop everything the cpu went down to 600ghz (if i remember correctly) which brings the vcore down to less than 1v (i think it was around 0.84v). Point is, your Vcore will change accordingly with TurboBoost.

To answer your question, if you want to OC your CPU to slightly higher clocks then you'd have to look into your mobo manual and use whatever software they provided you with (it's better than using some 3rd party). In fact, some mobo can adjust the bios in realtime so say you clocked your cpu at 4.5Ghz then you can run your test and set it back to default without rebooting.

What motherboard are you working with?

FYI: I know TurboBoost says it's max clock is 3.9Ghz but mine goes up to 4.3 Ghz (the highest i've seen it go so far). At first, I though it was MSI's tools that weren't reading correctly (I have a MSI mobo). But then I monitored my voltage, my FSB, my RAM, and my cpu clocks with other software (like CPUz) and it did in fact go up to 4.3Ghz when I was testing it.

And...to answer your real question, yes, pushing more voltage in your CPU means reducing your CPU lifespan. It's still too early to see how your CPU life will reduce from overclocking but if you use turboboost (as intended) then your cpu lifespan will live for a very very long time (considering your voltage is extremely low when idle). Unless you constantly pushing it's maximum voltage for extreme overclocking, I wouldn't worry too much about your CPU's lifespan.

Temperatures: Plays a pretty big role. So if you push your CPU for long periods of time while its temperatures remain around 70C, then I'd lower the voltage.

Hope this helped.
a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
June 21, 2012 2:57:30 PM

Just a note about the voltage. By default, so by Intel's specs, there is a Vdroop which means under load the voltage drops. The amount depends on both the CPU's power usage and the motherboard's VRM. But as already explained, more load means lower voltage (which is fine since it's also lower speed).

Anyway, if your new turbo settings are working properly, 73C is fine for a max burn test temp. Under normal usage it probably won't hit 70C. Just make sure you test it for stability. If unstable, it probably needs a small voltage bump.

EDIT: Actually turns out Ivy Bridge has slightly lower Tcase than previous gen. My CPU (i5 750) has a Tcase of 72.4C, but it seems the 3770k is only 67.4C. So, 73C is a tad high, but not terrible. I would probably consider lowering the OC.
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June 22, 2012 5:26:34 AM

Oops I meant how EASY would it be to get this.. not sure where "how was" came from..
June 22, 2012 3:56:56 PM

blueoakleyz said:
Oops I meant how EASY would it be to get this.. not sure where "how was" came from..



oooooh. Well here's the deal.

You can set the maximum clock lower or equal to the maximum TurboBoost (the 3770K's max is 3.9Ghz according to Intel).


But say you wanted your maximum clock to be 4.2GHz, you would have to disabled TurboBoost. Keep in mind that you can still use your motherboard's power saving features (i.e. C1E) meaning your CPU will still down clock when idle.


Edit: Examples might make this clearer

Example1: Let's say you set your multiplier to X37 for a 3.7Ghz clock then TurboBoost would NOT go higher than 3.7Ghz.

Example2: Let's say you set your multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock then TurboBoost shouldn't go higher than 3.9Ghz (the highest TurboBoost will go). I'll contradict my own self because I've gotten readings up to 4.3Ghz on my system but my MSI motherboard is full of goodies and I haven't check what's been pushing these behaviors. But on typical settings, 3.9 Ghz should be the highest readings).

Example3: Let's say you set your Multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock and disabled TurboBoost (and disabling any energy consumption settings like C1E) then your cpu would ALWAYS be clocked at 4.2Ghz.

Example4: Let's say you set your Multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock and disabled TurboBoost (but left your power consumption settings ON) then you would see your CPU go "up to" 4.2Ghz but go back down to much lower clocks when CPU is idle.

In a nutshell, use TurboBoost for stable and easy overclocking performance. Disable TurboBoost and play with motherboard settings for more extreme overclocking.

Makes sense?
July 3, 2012 5:51:38 AM

Alex The PC Gamer said:
oooooh. Well here's the deal.

You can set the maximum clock lower or equal to the maximum TurboBoost (the 3770K's max is 3.9Ghz according to Intel).


But say you wanted your maximum clock to be 4.2GHz, you would have to disabled TurboBoost. Keep in mind that you can still use your motherboard's power saving features (i.e. C1E) meaning your CPU will still down clock when idle.


Edit: Examples might make this clearer

Example1: Let's say you set your multiplier to X37 for a 3.7Ghz clock then TurboBoost would NOT go higher than 3.7Ghz.

Example2: Let's say you set your multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock then TurboBoost shouldn't go higher than 3.9Ghz (the highest TurboBoost will go). I'll contradict my own self because I've gotten readings up to 4.3Ghz on my system but my MSI motherboard is full of goodies and I haven't check what's been pushing these behaviors. But on typical settings, 3.9 Ghz should be the highest readings).

Example3: Let's say you set your Multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock and disabled TurboBoost (and disabling any energy consumption settings like C1E) then your cpu would ALWAYS be clocked at 4.2Ghz.

Example4: Let's say you set your Multiplier to x42 for a 4.2Ghz clock and disabled TurboBoost (but left your power consumption settings ON) then you would see your CPU go "up to" 4.2Ghz but go back down to much lower clocks when CPU is idle.

In a nutshell, use TurboBoost for stable and easy overclocking performance. Disable TurboBoost and play with motherboard settings for more extreme overclocking.

Makes sense?


I'm a little confused still. The Mobo allows me to set the turbo boost (specifically the turboboost) multipliers myself. So 4 cores:42x, 3 cores: 43x, 2 and 1 cores: 44x as an example
July 3, 2012 4:56:48 PM

blueoakleyz said:
I'm a little confused still. The Mobo allows me to set the turbo boost (specifically the turboboost) multipliers myself. So 4 cores:42x, 3 cores: 43x, 2 and 1 cores: 44x as an example



Well, let me answer your question with two additional questions then...

1 - Does your mobo let you also pick the voltage? or just the multiplier?

2 - What mobo do you have?

Here's my reasoning. Turbo Boost is a quick and easy way to get more out of your CPU (as it overclocks it up to 3.9Ghz by default). However, if you're looking to get higher clocks than 3.9Ghz), I wouldn't let turbo boost choose your voltage for several reasons... one being that it might decide to put way too much voltage (say above Intel's recommended maximum voltage) without you even knowing it...and this could seriously damage your CPU (and other components) in the process.

So going back to my statement and/or question...if your mobo lets you choose the voltage for each multiplier then I'd say it's safe to fiddle with these settings (as long as you know what you're doing). Otherwise, I'd manually overclock your system (no using Turbo Boost) and once everything is stable, then you can add energy saving features (like C1E).

Maybe this thread might help you (please read the later part): http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/311752-28-overclock-t...
a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 5:14:16 PM

As an addendum, some motherboards "only" have turbo boost for overclocking. Basically, there's no longer a base multiplier that is raised, instead it is the "turbo boost" multiplier that is raised.

So, even for a straight OC, say 4ghz all the time under load (regardless of 1 core or 4 cores) you would have to adjust the Turbo Boost multiplier.
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