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Small improvement: 2600K at 4Ghz

Last response: in Overclocking
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June 24, 2012 11:46:00 AM

I OCd my 2600K at 4Ghz and the Windows 7 CPU performance went from 7.6 to 7.7. The memory score went from 7.8 to 7.9.

Is this amount of improvement all I can expect?
a b à CPUs
a b $ Windows 7
a b K Overclocking
June 24, 2012 12:05:10 PM

Who care's about Windows 7 WEI.

If you want to see the performance difference run a benchmark.
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June 24, 2012 2:12:05 PM

like what?
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June 24, 2012 3:02:38 PM

Well if you care about noticeable differences, overclocking an i7 wont "improve" anything, if you care about benchmarking, buy a Corsair H100 and push that thing to 5ghz! :-D
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June 24, 2012 4:19:41 PM

Max1s said:
Well if you care about noticeable differences, overclocking an i7 wont "improve" anything, if you care about benchmarking, buy a Corsair H100 and push that thing to 5ghz! :-D


Not sure I understand what you mean. Isn't 4ghz faster than 3.4ghz?
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a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
June 24, 2012 4:53:04 PM

ratsa said:
Not sure I understand what you mean. Isn't 4ghz faster than 3.4ghz?

Depends on what you are doing. If you do video editing, or many other tasks for EX: Folding @ Home, the 600mhz increase would benefit you.

Like this:
Folding@Home PPD i7-2600K stock clocks, 8000-9000PPD
Folding@Home PPD i7-2600K 4.5ghz, 16000-18000PPD

Cinebench/Cinema 4d
Cinebench(stock): 6.8
Cinebench(4.5ghz): 9.2

Cinema 4d(5 second 3d scene)
Stock: 1 hour
OC: 30 min
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June 24, 2012 4:55:27 PM

Well yes, but 3.4 is the 'stock' clock. In real life, you'll never see 3.4, youll either see the 1.6ghz idle clock, or the 3.8ghz turbo clock. (I assume you changed the turbo multiplier from 38 to 40...) So its actually only 200mhz difference.

What I mean is that the 26k is already so fast you wont see a speed difference in any programs, except benchmarks.
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a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
June 24, 2012 4:57:21 PM

You will see some improvement, just not a lot. If he did do it that way, 4ghz would only be on a single core. If you ran a program that could use all four cores it would be running at 3.7ghz.
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June 24, 2012 5:06:54 PM

The reason why you won't be seeing any difference is because the I7 is already extremely powerfull. To persue a different analogy, the i7 is 20 ton loaded truck: If you get hit by that thing speeding at 100 KPH, you are quite dead. If you get hit by it at 120 KPH, you are also quite dead. The difference only matters to a very small amount of people (in this case, the forensics department, in your case, benchmarks, processing software, scientific experiments), but for everyone else (newspaper, friends and family, or in your case, games and word and Windows) there's no noticable difference.
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June 24, 2012 9:23:06 PM

Max1s said:
Well yes, but 3.4 is the 'stock' clock. In real life, you'll never see 3.4, youll either see the 1.6ghz idle clock, or the 3.8ghz turbo clock. (I assume you changed the turbo multiplier from 38 to 40...) So its actually only 200mhz difference.

What I mean is that the 26k is already so fast you wont see a speed difference in any programs, except benchmarks.



I only care about hyperthreaded programs, not turbo mode. When you OC, doesn't that push all the cores at once?
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a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
June 25, 2012 6:51:44 AM

ratsa said:
I only care about hyperthreaded programs, not turbo mode. When you OC, doesn't that push all the cores at once?

Depending on how you OC'ed.
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June 25, 2012 3:44:58 PM

amuffin said:
Depending on how you OC'ed.


I used a built in profile in the Asrock Z77 Extreme4. I wanted to go slow and make sure that temps don't get out of hand.
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July 2, 2012 1:04:23 AM




Wow, when people say it's easy to OC an i7-2600K, what are they talking about? I thought all you had to do is increase the unlocked multiplier. Does increasing the unlocked multiplier boost all 4 cores or just the turbo core?
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