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PowerColor HD 5770 Play Edition ?

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Last response: in Graphics Cards
December 19, 2009 9:52:37 PM

i was going to buy a hd4870 and corsaw 450 watt after my exam. but now i am planing to buy a HD 5770(PowerColor HD 5770 Play Edition ) from http://www.ebuyer.com/product/185910 and corsaw 550w VX from http://www.ebuyer.com/product/185910. Is the grahic card any good? in terms of cooling and whatnot.

also HD5970 just came out, you think there gona be a price drop anytime soon? should i buy it now?

ps how do i know if psu fit on my comp or not?



my spec http://support.packardbell.com/uk/item/?m=home&pn=PT.U0...

More about : powercolor 5770 play edition

a c 376 U Graphics card
December 19, 2009 10:06:18 PM

An HD5890 is 4 times as expensive as the other 2 cards you mention so they aren't really comparable. If you want to game at 2560x1600 an HD5970 would be something to consider but otherwise it's overkill.
The card should be fine but you may want to call Packard Bell to be certain that your case can fit a standard sized PSU.
a b U Graphics card
December 19, 2009 10:08:29 PM

askara said:
i was going to buy a hd4870 and corsaw 450 watt after my exam. but now i am planing to buy a HD 5770(PowerColor HD 5770 Play Edition ) from http://www.ebuyer.com/product/185910 and corsaw 550w VX from http://www.ebuyer.com/product/185910. Is the grahic card any good? in terms of cooling and whatnot.

also HD5970 just came out, you think there gona be a price drop anytime soon? should i buy it now?

ps how do i know if psu fit on my comp or not?



my spec http://support.packardbell.com/uk/item/?m=home&pn=PT.U0...


First off a HD 5970 would be bottlenecked by your CPU: AMD Phenom X4 9650

Second theres no way a HD 5970 will fit into your case looking at the case the HD 5970 is well over 12" long going to 13.5" depending on brand. I would recommend you make measurements on the case to make sure a HD 5770 can fit in the case, and that your motherboard has a PCI-E 2.0 connection.

Third contact Packard Bell and ask them if the case they gave you supports standard atx psu, which is the size of most power supplies. The power supplies should tell you in writing what type of dimensions they use (Standard ATX being the most common).
Related resources
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 19, 2009 10:17:01 PM

An HD5770 is about 8 inches long and shorter than a microATX motherboard so the length shouldn't be an issue. They are all two slot cards however so that could be an issue depending on if you need the slot the cooler will cover, but probably not.
PCI-E 2.0 isn't necessary as the cards are backward compatible.
December 19, 2009 10:26:04 PM

i mean hd 5970 is out will there be a price drop on the 5770 soon XD
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 19, 2009 10:31:23 PM

Oh. No, the HD5970 should have no effect on the price of the HD5770. What may affect it is competition from Nvidia. Their new cards won't be out for a few months however and no one knows anything about their performance or pricing so it's possible there still might not be any direct competition for the HD5770.
December 19, 2009 10:36:23 PM

hmmm maybe then after chrismas there will be a pricedrop.

so no info on the cooler of the card?
a b U Graphics card
December 20, 2009 10:51:34 AM

It's arctic cooling and supposedly the quietest cooler on the 5770.

I saw those too and would have bought two of them but the next day delivery was going to take 3-4 days instead. I still might just buy a couple tbh, seeing as I've got my cash back for the RMA'd 5850.
December 24, 2009 10:06:21 PM

just got the HD 5770, and hell it is not quiet at all, runing game like last remnant sounds like a v6 car engine.

maybe because i never used a high end card, but when i use my nvidia G100 you can hardly hear it.
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 25, 2009 5:58:12 AM

You can DL software such as rivatuner and try adjusting the fan speed on your own.
December 26, 2009 11:52:53 AM

but would that make the card over heat?
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 26, 2009 5:27:38 PM

The program can also show you the temperature of the card. I'm sure turning the fan too low and then gaming can cause overheating so obviously don't do that.
a b U Graphics card
December 26, 2009 5:43:37 PM

Catalyst Control Center (CCC) also allows changing the fan from variable (jet taking off everytime you load up a game) to a set level you are comfortable with. With variable rate, the card will often idle at almost zero fan speed, then spool up to 70-80% fan speed under load. Often having a steady state 40-50% fan speed will give you similar temp control without the roar.
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2009 9:26:10 AM

Just try the fan at 20-30%, that should keep it very quiet. After that run a game or something and alt-tab to check the temps. If they go above 80C you might have to increase the fan speed a touch more although 100C is generally when the system gets unstable.

I doubt a 5770 will even get to 80C but keep your eye on it anyway.
a b U Graphics card
December 27, 2009 11:34:25 PM

A PowerColor HD 5770 Play! even with it's "better cooling" will easily hit 80c or higher at 20-30% fan when you game. On idle you will be fine at 20%-30% speed.


Whenever you game leave it at at least 60%, that should keep you below or around 80c in which case you better have some good case fans because your processor, memory, and motherboard are going to feel it big time. I honestly don't even think it will be stable at that temperature not because of the GPU but because of other components, in particular the motherboard.
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 12:59:20 AM

That has to be a very hot case tbh.

When I had my 5850 it was pretty much inaudible over my case fans even on max gaming. Temps never went above 71C load and I just don't see how a 5770 can get so much hotter in a decently ventilated case.
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 5:09:52 AM

lol... The 5800 series have a 400w heat dissipating cooler, vs a 100w-150w dissipation on the 5700s.
That is why it's so cool.
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 5:21:45 AM

Pardon the 400w heat dissipation is the HD 5970s.

The HD 5800s have a better cooler still versus the HD 5700s since the HD 5800s use far more power. Damn powercolors lack of tech specs :/ .
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 5:40:06 AM

I hate doing these triple posts but TH doesnt let me edit messages.

The PowerCooler 5770 Play! edition uses the Accelero L2 Pro VGA cooler from Arctic Cooling. This puts out a 100w heat dissipation, which is nothing compared to the HD 5800 series (5870 I think) which here are the temperatures on the fan speeds:

From Tweakers.net:
Idle, fan at 20%: 40°C
Idle, fan at 50%: 32°C
Idle, fan at 100%: 31°C
Load, fan at 20%: 91°C
Load, fan at 30%: 75°C
Load, fan at 50%: 58°C
Load, fan at 100%: 53°C

I can easily tell the 5770 will hit 80c+ easily on 20%-30% fan.
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 8:34:42 AM

Yes but don't forget the 5850 is also TWICE the size of the 5770.
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 9:03:17 AM

AsAnAtheist said:
Whenever you game leave it at at least 60%, that should keep you below or around 80c in which case you better have some good case fans because your processor, memory, and motherboard are going to feel it big time. I honestly don't even think it will be stable at that temperature not because of the GPU but because of other components, in particular the motherboard.

Actual GPU core temps aside the amount of heat a card gives off is directly related to the amount of power it uses. That's basic thermodynamics. A fan does not actually get rid of heat, it just moves it someplace else. With a fan/heatsink that doesn't vent outside the case(most HD5770s) what temp your GPU is running at shouldn't really affect the temp inside the case or other components. In fact the card should give off slightly less heat in total if the fan is off and the gpu is frying compared to it on full blast because the fan itself generates a small amount of heat.
December 28, 2009 11:05:14 AM

AsAnAtheist said:
I hate doing these triple posts but TH doesnt let me edit messages.

The PowerCooler 5770 Play! edition uses the Accelero L2 Pro VGA cooler from Arctic Cooling. This puts out a 100w heat dissipation, which is nothing compared to the HD 5800 series (5870 I think) which here are the temperatures on the fan speeds:

From Tweakers.net:
Idle, fan at 20%: 40°C
Idle, fan at 50%: 32°C
Idle, fan at 100%: 31°C
Load, fan at 20%: 91°C
Load, fan at 30%: 75°C
Load, fan at 50%: 58°C
Load, fan at 100%: 53°C

I can easily tell the 5770 will hit 80c+ easily on 20%-30% fan.

This seems to be little strange to me as i was hitting less temperatures on mine 5870 even 4870x2 could keep temperature under 80 on 35% fan speed (default cooler).

Anyway i changed to watercooling and now enjoying 23-35°C idle/load with nearly silence :lol: 

I would try 22% fan speed in 2D and 35% when gaming and try some benchmark to heal it up to check max temperatures.
Even when you have fan speed on manual and GPU should reach critical temperatures GPU should override fan settings and pump it up to close 100% until temperature get down again (happened to me few times on 4870x2 when i forgot to activate 3D fan profile).
a b U Graphics card
December 28, 2009 10:01:12 PM

jyjjy said:
Actual GPU core temps aside the amount of heat a card gives off is directly related to the amount of power it uses. That's basic thermodynamics. A fan does not actually get rid of heat, it just moves it someplace else. With a fan/heatsink that doesn't vent outside the case(most HD5770s) what temp your GPU is running at shouldn't really affect the temp inside the case or other components. In fact the card should give off slightly less heat in total if the fan is off and the gpu is frying compared to it on full blast because the fan itself generates a small amount of heat.


Amount of heat a card gives off is not directly related the amount of power it uses for two main reasons:
1) It varies from materials used. (Different metals conduct heat more freely or with restraint)
2) If that was the case then a 100w dissipating cooler will easily leave a GPU at the temperature it is in when it is off while on load.

Amount of heat a card gives off is not always directly related to the amount of power it uses, it depends on the materials used, current, and power fed and many more variables..

If the GPU is frying you will certainly see your temperatures spike up on all components. Please turn off your GPU fan, run it on load and tell me your CPU, motherboard temperatures afterward. Have you never touched a GPU after use? I certainly have it isn't pretty. You'd be surprised how much heat processors, and gpus can give off. Even memory at an inferior power consumption of around 1v-2v.

There is no such thing as basic thermodynamics for explaining how a GPU's generated heat would be dissipated or have an impact on the air around the GPU.

In theory 400w of power should leave 400w of heat if running through a non conductive material. If it's run through a 100% (doesnt exist, but silver is pretty darn good at doing this) conductive material, it would produce no heat just an amazing power grid.

Quote:
In fact the card should give off slightly less heat in total if the fan is off and the gpu is frying compared to it on full blast because the fan itself generates a small amount of heat.


Wow. First off a GPU that does NOT blow air out of the case would create a hotter inside which can then attribute to other component's heat (this is why blower style fans are a preferred method of cooling GPU's (not as cost effective or efficient as a traditional direct blowing fan but dissipates less heat inside the case). Second, air can also carry heat btw which is what happens when a heat sink/fan combination are used. From there, your case fans (if your smart enough to have some) will dissipate the heat out of the case into your room.
The reason why we use fans in heat sinks is to bring COLDER air to the heat sink so it reduces the amount of heat that the heat sink is holding. From there your case fans will remove the air. This allows for heat to build in the heat sink/air around it. If you remove your GPU's fan, the air flow on your GPU's heatsink transferring heat would be completely inadequate.

If you were to remove the fan, and let the GPU fry, you would effectively have built a cooker inside your PC. Immediately you will see temperatures increase.
a c 376 U Graphics card
December 29, 2009 12:51:23 AM

The basic principles I stated are entirely sound. Seriously, this is basic physics. Power cannot simply disappear, conductive materials or not if a card USES a certain amount of power it is, in the end, transformed into heat. Silver wires with current running through them do NOT use the power they carry and thus do NOT give off heat so it is entirely irrelevant. Video cards are not magical and cannot break the first law of thermodynamics.
As for the fan thing I stated the CARD creates more heat in total with the fan on than off and that is 100% true. That the fan creates an airflow that in conjunction with the case fans allows for the heat to be removed from the system more effectively does not change that THE CARD itself creates more heat. If the airflow in the case is good enough, then no, running your GPU at above 100 degrees should not affect the other components. In fact plenty of microprocessors come close to that as a normal operating temperature without cooking the entire system. How concentrated the heat is in the processor itself does not change the overall amount of heat the card gives off. How much heat it gives off is DIRECTLY related to how much power it uses and that applies to every electrical device in existence(minus the usually trivial amount of energy that is turned into light or sound in some cases) and you can argue with that all you want but you will be wrong.
a b U Graphics card
December 29, 2009 6:32:10 PM

jyjjy said:
The basic principles I stated are entirely sound. Seriously, this is basic physics. Power cannot simply disappear, conductive materials or not if a card USES a certain amount of power it is, in the end, transformed into heat. Silver wires with current running through them do NOT use the power they carry and thus do NOT give off heat so it is entirely irrelevant. Video cards are not magical and cannot break the first law of thermodynamics.
As for the fan thing I stated the CARD creates more heat in total with the fan on than off and that is 100% true. That the fan creates an airflow that in conjunction with the case fans allows for the heat to be removed from the system more effectively does not change that THE CARD itself creates more heat. If the airflow in the case is good enough, then no, running your GPU at above 100 degrees should not affect the other components. In fact plenty of microprocessors come close to that as a normal operating temperature without cooking the entire system. How concentrated the heat is in the processor itself does not change the overall amount of heat the card gives off. How much heat it gives off is DIRECTLY related to how much power it uses and that applies to every electrical device in existence(minus the usually trivial amount of energy that is turned into light or sound in some cases) and you can argue with that all you want but you will be wrong.



First off passing current through any metal or conductive material will produce heat. How much is dependent on the resistance in the metal. Like I have stated before. This is specially true when using tungsten, and specially true when using silver as it will produce very very little heat. Also why we don't have a 100% electrically efficient power grid, because a good portion of the electricity is lost as heat.

Guess what is flowing through the GPU? Electricity. The only reason why GPU's produce heat is because of the resistance created while using the electricity. In turn electric energy converts into heat as the resistance of the electrons flowing through the metal causes friction. This is why any electrical device will give off heat. Now how much is concentrated, or what the surface area is also comes into point into how much heat the device will give off.

Yes in paper specs, more gpu's should survive over 100c+ at stock speeds, with max fan on. However in reality manufacturing defects occur, specially in microprocessors they're so small that even a .000010 cm offset could end up frying the GPU. Even some of the most precision cutting instruments (used mostly for steel precision cutting) have a .010cm variation (if i remember correctly).

Yes you are right that the fan in the GPU also helps the air flow in the case, which was where I was going with it. A card left without a fan to fry would produce higher heat in the case than a card frying with a fan for two reasons: Let's take a case without fans.
1. Air inside the case would be heated up, but without airflow the heat would remain driving heat to other components like memory, power supply, motherboard bridges, and cpu.
2. The high pressure caused by the heat would drive minimal colder air currents to go into the case, and out of the case. This airflow however is so minimal that it can be considered irrelevant as the minimal colder air would almost certainly be heated under a minute.

Now take the same principle I just discussed and add in case fans, but no GPU fan.
1. The gpu's surface area will not change, the only thing that will change is the airflow on the case being lowered.
2. The air inside the case will get hotter because while the joules (heat) are the same coming from the GPU there is no fan there to dissipate the heat from the heatsink. Since the heatsink is still present the surface area in the heatsink is the same, thus giving off the same amount of heat outward. Without adequate air flow to remove the excess heat, the case temperatures would increase. Even the most popular case the Antec 900 would be able to push the air out, and in fast enough to cool the temperature inside the case.

As you can tell the real killer isnt so much the GPU, but the lack of air flow.

I wish I could do testing on my GPU, but unfortunately it's a blower style fan.
a b U Graphics card
December 29, 2009 7:41:27 PM

Heat retention and heat production are two different topics. When it comes to how it directly effects a card's performance, heat retention is the devil. Higher ambient temps, lack of airflow, low wattage rated HSF, and poor seating of the HSF will all increase the heat retention at the GPU, regardless of the heat production that occurs. I think this technical e-peen dance has been going on long enough. ;)