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I7-920 vs I7-950 vs I7-960 and any other CPU - FED UP!!!

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December 22, 2009 9:25:10 AM

These people really confuse me. At some forum people will say "Get the 920 other chips are not worth it"... Look at the forum below.

http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.aspx?m=62083


And for SSD, they said get the 920 and get an ssd it will improve your performance or FPS for games, well the game below doesn't say that.

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-253896_14_0.ht...

No offense to anyone reading this but you can't give advise to people if you yourself doesn't even have the system. Some of them give advise eventhough their system is not i7.

Do some people tell you to get the lower specs because they can not afford to get the higher specs? Or Do they tell you to get the specs so that your equal.

Like the forum below,

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-272161_10_0.ht...

The OP is asking about stock coolers and these people keep on butting the 920 in the picture! WTF!

Quote:
Here is where I'm coming from. I had a pc that I use for almost how many years now and it's starting to bagger-up. Basically whenever I turn it on It's like saying "I want to retire! Pleeease!" When I first bought that it's like the 920 vs the other chips. So I went for the one in the middle like what I'm doing again. During those days OC is not really an easy option. But then again even if it is I still wouldn't. I guess this is a different time now. It might be a marketing strategy for intel to make more money. But when user OC they adjust the voltage level, they need a good cooler, a good mobo, a good memory , a good psu , etc... (which is like additional cost compare to just get the basics), then they have to test the stability of the system. Probably most of them get it stable but there still a percentage who doesn't, which means they have to do another trial and error or research, hassle...the like . It might give thrill for the enthusiast. But for user like me who only want to get on with their work without having to worry about all those things and don't like additional stress (might be Over acting Here) because they are already stress with their jobs or with their life.

I have been googling a lot about differences of these chips. And people keep on saying get the 920... 940 or 950 or 960 is not worth it... If there is a person out there who will provide some concrete evidence of the long term benefit of OCing 920 vs using other chips at stock clock then these questions will answered. Evidence between Power Consumption voltage not only the chip but also the whole system of 920 OC to 950 vs 950@ stock. With computation of how much money you will save when you buy it vs when using it. Life span of the chips when OCed and not OCed. A person that is not biased.

This is a challenge. And I guess that will change a lot because people from Intel will be awaken that consumers are not stupid not like me. And maybe... just maybe, they will think before creating the same marketing strategy. Because until there are people out there like me then Intel will become richer and richer.


People please stick to the question and don't tell people what to get and what not to get!

More about : 920 950 960 cpu fed

December 22, 2009 10:02:35 AM

25 people read and nobody care to comment! WTFing useless.
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December 22, 2009 12:57:57 PM

You dont understand, the price difference of between the i7-920, and the i7950/60, is upto $300/£200, but they essentially use the same architechture, and design. the only difference is +200Mhz speed of the 950/960.

With £200 you could buy a second graphics Card, which shows much bigger benefit, As in the current state the processor is not the bottleneck.

Also the 920 can easily be overclocked to match the 950/960 performance. and with turbo boost, that can be applied when in need

You can trust me as I own an i7 system. (i7-920 to be exact)

A question though: Only the eXtreme edition -i7's have unlocked multipliers,
How come the normal ones have locked multipliers, is this a hardware limitation, or have Intel done this to force enthusiast to buy the 20x more expensive i7XE (975)
December 22, 2009 1:05:35 PM

Your post is quite fascinating and quite frightening at the same time. But I’m with you about this OC business. And I notice that on some blogs as well about some people advise you to get 920 even though they’re using AMD or a non-i7 chip. I have the same question myself on another post. But I'm keen to get the 960. Can I ask are you like that because you also cannot decide what to get?
December 22, 2009 1:26:06 PM

winkerbie said:
You dont understand, the price difference of between the i7-920, and the i7950/60, is upto $300/£200, but they essentially use the same architechture, and design. the only difference is +200Mhz speed of the 950/960.

With £200 you could buy a second graphics Card, which shows much bigger benefit, As in the current state the processor is not the bottleneck.

Also the 920 can easily be overclocked to match the 950/960 performance. and with turbo boost, that can be applied when in need

You can trust me as I own an i7 system. (i7-920 to be exact)

A question though: Only the eXtreme edition -i7's have unlocked multipliers,
How come the normal ones have locked multipliers, is this a hardware limitation, or have Intel done this to force enthusiast to buy the 20x more expensive i7XE (975)


Funny you said that +200Mhz, that's per core right? Meaning you will have x4 core and x8 on hyperthreading mode. Have you ever own or seen a i7-960 performance to compare? To actually say that it's the same. From PC_Plums post he said about getting better components if you overclocked. Which is true so basically, you will save money to buy the chip but you will endup using that save money to buy better components.

“Not all CPUs are made equal. It was sold to run at that clock speed, if it fails when you overclock it's not really faulty, but then again... What they don't know...”

As for your question, It's business isn't? And it kind of make sense becuase extreme is for enthusiast who uses LN2. But if you are a consumer who is just after with additional power (maybe not that great) but hassle free. you can add the bragging rights as well. :na: 
December 22, 2009 1:28:29 PM

robertomad said:
Your post is quite fascinating and quite frightening at the same time. But I’m with you about this OC business. And I notice that on some blogs as well about some people advise you to get 920 even though they’re using AMD or a non-i7 chip. I have the same question myself on another post. But I'm keen to get the 960. Can I ask are you like that because you also cannot decide what to get?



Like the #2 poster on this link

http://forums.overclockersclub.com/?showtopic=170839
December 22, 2009 2:23:28 PM

robertomad said:
Your post is quite fascinating and quite frightening at the same time. But I’m with you about this OC business. And I notice that on some blogs as well about some people advise you to get 920 even though they’re using AMD or a non-i7 chip. I have the same question myself on another post. But I'm keen to get the 960. Can I ask are you like that because you also cannot decide what to get?


Well I am a Core-i7 920 user, so I have experience in this type of processor. If you look at the reviews, the higher models are slightly faster than the 920, but that is due to the higher clock rates. But otherwise, all reviews definetly show that the CPU is not the bottleneck

All the Core i7-900's use the same technology, but just run at different clock speeds!

As for overclocking when you increase the base clock of the 920 by 10Mhz

It becomes 10 x21 = +210Mhz which applies across all cores and threads. (multiplier is usually x21 with turbo mode enabled)

Also note that some reviews show that an OC 920 is faster than a stock i7-965 XE!

Yes the higher models were designed to run faster but consider the cost difference and you will see what value for money
December 22, 2009 2:24:38 PM

If you have the money yes go ahead with the faster models, but those who have a tight budget, you are better of with a 920
December 22, 2009 2:24:59 PM

In my opinion, MOBO and CPU are the hardest components to upgrade. Unless you’ve got money and you want to keep up with the new trends. That is why I like to have a better CPU so that I will just upgrade later if more power is needed. Probably OC when that time comes. But in terms of GPU, memory, HDD, etc.; these components are replaceable and can also be transferable unless new technology emerge e.g. AGP to PCI to PCIe. So why not buy the good CPU and MOBO now and OC later that’s a long term benefit. As for the SSD, I guess if you wanted speed running programs and OS. Again, when you need more power. As they always say when people try to convince everybody to go with 920, you won’t need that much power… I agree but not for so long. New Software emerges almost every 6 months. As for games, even people from different forums says there no FPS benefit. But there is when you OC. So why not go with the better one?
December 22, 2009 2:37:51 PM

winkerbie said:
Well I am a Core-i7 920 user, so I have experience in this type of processor. If you look at the reviews, the higher models are slightly faster than the 920, but that is due to the higher clock rates. But otherwise, all reviews definetly show that the CPU is not the bottleneck

All the Core i7-900's use the same technology, but just run at different clock speeds!

As for overclocking when you increase the base clock of the 920 by 10Mhz

It becomes 10 x21 = +210Mhz which applies across all cores and threads. (multiplier is usually x21 with turbo mode enabled)

Also note that some reviews show that an OC 920 is faster than a stock i7-965 XE!

Yes the higher models were designed to run faster but consider the cost difference and you will see what value for money


Where is the value for money if you need to buy better components. If you can tell me; buy the cheapest MOBO, COOLER, MEMORY and you're still better off OCing then that's the value for money. And have you also consider the additional power it needed? Add that to the electricity bill and temperature. As you already know 920@stock and 950@stock have the same TDP which is 130. so if you OC 920 @4.0 some of them average to 147+ TDP. So how is that better?
December 22, 2009 6:14:08 PM

jamesgomez08 said:
Where is the value for money if you need to buy better components. If you can tell me; buy the cheapest MOBO, COOLER, MEMORY and you're still better off OCing then that's the value for money. And have you also consider the additional power it needed? Add that to the electricity bill and temperature. As you already know 920@stock and 950@stock have the same TDP which is 130. so if you OC 920 @4.0 some of them average to 147+ TDP. So how is that better?


Can you calculate the added electiricty bill?
December 22, 2009 6:22:53 PM

jamesgomez08 said:
Where is the value for money if you need to buy better components. If you can tell me; buy the cheapest MOBO, COOLER, MEMORY and you're still better off OCing then that's the value for money. And have you also consider the additional power it needed? Add that to the electricity bill and temperature. As you already know 920@stock and 950@stock have the same TDP which is 130. so if you OC 920 @4.0 some of them average to 147+ TDP. So how is that better?


You assume that the CPU is constantly running at 100% load, on idle it has a power raiting of 45W, on max load then yeah its ~140W, but this will fluctuate, due to turbo boost feature, and the fact that you will never run the CPU at max load, even in gaming.

buying the cheapest motherboard brings about unreliability, which is a huge factor. Also the 920 is the cheapest i7 availible!
December 23, 2009 10:45:55 AM

winkerbie said:
You assume that the CPU is constantly running at 100% load, on idle it has a power raiting of 45W, on max load then yeah its ~140W, but this will fluctuate, due to turbo boost feature, and the fact that you will never run the CPU at max load, even in gaming.

buying the cheapest motherboard brings about unreliability, which is a huge factor. Also the 920 is the cheapest i7 availible!


But my point is if I buy the cheapest component and buy the i7 950 and not OC. It's practically the same thing or even better. It will only be unreliable if you OC it plus you don't have to put additional voltage and no additional heat so you can even use the stock cooler.
December 23, 2009 3:22:21 PM

jamesgomez08 said:
But my point is if I buy the cheapest component and buy the i7 950 and not OC. It's practically the same thing or even better. It will only be unreliable if you OC it plus you don't have to put additional voltage and no additional heat so you can even use the stock cooler.


A 920 can be OC to ~3.4/3.6 GHZ on stock volatages. This is because Intel use standardised voltages on all their chips, rather than testing each individual chip for the ideal voltage.

Also spending £20 on an after market cooler is cheaper than £200 on a higher model CPU
December 23, 2009 9:46:15 PM

But you just don't only buy the cooler isn't? How about the motherboard the memory and PSU?
June 22, 2010 4:40:30 PM

something none of you guys have mentioned on here is system temps, with a higher spec cpu it has a higher clock by default therefore it doesnt need to be overclocked as much meaning lower core temp unless your an overclock enthusiast and wish to overclock to the max. I have a core i7 960 on an asus p6x58d premium motherboard and 6 gig of corsair dominator TR3X6G1600C8D,Hdd is Samsung spinpoint f1 1tb no ssd and have 2x nvidia 8800gtx xxx gpu's I have no problem running most games at high settings and my video encode is very quick my cpu is cooled by a corsair hydro h50 version 2 no overclock on cpu
June 22, 2010 4:56:44 PM

The I7-920/930 is the same exact structure as the i7-950/960. CPU Manufacturers test the freshly made CPUs with an algorithm that determines the "quality" of each chip in the same batch. Depending on the score, they then appropriate the proper "name" on the chip, and then change the base clock on it. End users are paying $200-$300 more for a "better" chip out of the same batch, on top of the warranty that the manufacturer provides at that upgraded base clock.

EX: Imagine making a batch of cookies on a single sheet. The cookies in the middle are baked evenly, perfect coloring and great taste. The cookies on the edge might have a little bit darker edges and might be cooked a little less evenly, but still taste pretty damn good. Both cookies use the same exact dough and cooking process, it's just that one of them tastes a little bit better.

Reasons to buy an i7-950/960 over an i7-920/930 (if you know what you are doing):
1) Manufacturer warranty. This may be the case in productivity (work) environments where warranties are required on work computers.
2) Extreme overclocking. If you buy a 950/960 and don't overclock over 4.0+, you're pretty bad.
3) Money is no object to you. If you don't have to pay for the parts, then by all means, waste whoever's money is buying the stuff for you. Buy me one, too!
4) ????

Giggity.
October 13, 2010 2:01:17 AM

Omniblivion said:
The I7-920/930 is the same exact structure as the i7-950/960. CPU Manufacturers test the freshly made CPUs with an algorithm that determines the "quality" of each chip in the same batch. Depending on the score, they then appropriate the proper "name" on the chip, and then change the base clock on it. End users are paying $200-$300 more for a "better" chip out of the same batch, on top of the warranty that the manufacturer provides at that upgraded base clock.

EX: Imagine making a batch of cookies on a single sheet. The cookies in the middle are baked evenly, perfect coloring and great taste. The cookies on the edge might have a little bit darker edges and might be cooked a little less evenly, but still taste pretty damn good. Both cookies use the same exact dough and cooking process, it's just that one of them tastes a little bit better.

Reasons to buy an i7-950/960 over an i7-920/930 (if you know what you are doing):
1) Manufacturer warranty. This may be the case in productivity (work) environments where warranties are required on work computers.
2) Extreme overclocking. If you buy a 950/960 and don't overclock over 4.0+, you're pretty bad.
3) Money is no object to you. If you don't have to pay for the parts, then by all means, waste whoever's money is buying the stuff for you. Buy me one, too!
4) ????

Giggity.


Hi all,

Thought i'd add my 2 cents worth as I agree with some comments and not others.

Basically after owning two 920's and now a 960 (cheap pickup) the main benefits are that apart from the 200-300 mhz OC .. i.e i'm at 4.4 stable with the 960.. your stressing your IMC and other internals less with the 960 due to the higher multi.. I won't get into the binning business as i think thats secondary.. i mean you coudl pick up a golden 920 or a sh!t 960 so..

Again to reiterate though with a 960 your voltages/uncore/mem timings etc have more play with a 960 , generate less heat at the same 920 timings etc (generally) and can outperform at higher OC's.. i.e using extreme mem settings .. keeping uncore close to 4000 with higher OC with higher mem bandwidth without stressingyour system..

My cooling is H50 P/P btw.. With UD7/I7 960, 5970.. Falcon 120GB HDD Trident 2000 ram @ 7-8-7-20..

Cheers
Mick
a b B Homebuilt system
a b à CPUs
October 13, 2010 3:17:04 PM

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