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How far do you think I can make it?

Last response: in Overclocking
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July 1, 2012 12:19:18 AM

Well, I'm not new to overclocking, I should mention this to begin with. However, Its been with older systems with good boards, or newer systems via software and stock cooling. However, I have ordered parts for a new desktop that I'm building that will allow me to work in Bios with newer hardware and better cooling.

To do this, my system will be equipped with an Asus P5Q SE Motherboard, with an Intel Core 2 Duo Conroe 2.66GHz LGA775 CPU, and the cooler is going to be a Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus. To add to this, my case is going to be the pretty and chilly Antec Nine Hundred (900) gaming case. How far with these specs and parts do you think I can go?

Any response would be greatly appreciated :D 

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 12:30:37 AM

have you tried google?
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July 1, 2012 12:41:44 AM

Anonymous said:
have you tried google?


I take back what I said about any response being appreciated. PROPER responses will be appreciated. I can SEE that some people can rach anywhere from 2.8-4.3GHz. I'm asking what someone might expect of my hardware given those specific qualities. Im asking for an estimate. Yes, yes I have tried google. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, I would like to ask for myself. If you dont have anything worth saying, please don't say it. it just upsets me. :I

FOR EXAMPLE: I ask question.

Bad response: Go google it :pt1cable: 

Good response: I dont know, im thinking "blah blah technical explanation as to why" so your probably looking at something like 3.4GHz. I don't know, but I would appreciate responses that show people trying to help in the community instead of being snarky. =I
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Anonymous
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a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 12:48:38 AM

stop. you're gonna make me cry.

really you know how loaded this forum is with people asking questions that take longer to type out that just entering a simple query in google?

you want me to type out a complete guide that has already been written?

tell you the common phrases such as" your millage may very" or "watch your temps" or the wonderful "keep the voltages down to a minimum"

sorry don't have the time. and speaking of time. take some time yourself and try overclocking after doing your own research and then maybe someone will see that if your willing to put the effort into it, then they will put some effort into helping you.

seriously, i just asked you what research have you already done.

good luck with that. :) 
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July 1, 2012 1:18:55 AM

Anonymous said:
stop. you're gonna make me cry.

really you know how loaded this forum is with people asking questions that take longer to type out that just entering a simple query in google?

you want me to type out a complete guide that has already been written?

tell you the common phrases such as" your millage may very" or "watch your temps" or the wonderful "keep the voltages down to a minimum"

sorry don't have the time. and speaking of time. take some time yourself and try overclocking after doing your own research and then maybe someone will see that if your willing to put the effort into it, then they will put some effort into helping you.

seriously, i just asked you what research have you already done.

good luck with that. :) 


I'm sorry about that, I don't usually just explode at people but I've seen that same line far too many times for comfort. I hadn't realised you were actually inquiring about my research, I just took it as a common snarky response on forums. Usually "try google" is right up there with "WRONG SECTION THIS THREAD IS WRONGLY PLACED" which is completely irrelevant. Though people should infact place threads in better places, a lot of people just respond to questions with stupidity and or attitude. In your case, im sorry for snapping at you.

For the research I did on it, I carefully chose all of my parts based on both quality and price (I had a limited budget). Ive found that the C2D Conroe core is a relatively cool CPU with a good amount of headroom for overclocking. Some people maxed at 3.4, some max at 4.5GHz, though the highest numbers were achieved with water cooling. My processor cooler was chosen due to its popularity amonst system builders who use air cooling instead of water cooling as it does an excellent job bringing temps right down.

A big problem for me is that I dont know where the line is drawn for users like me who equip air-coolers instead of liquid coolers or ridiculous nitrogen coolers. With the parts that I have, I cant find a good estimate as people have even topped off at around 2.8GHz, which means a 240MHz (or so) overclock, which is IMO pretty sad.

Based on these figures and information, would you be able to make an educated guess as to where the numbers might stand? :p 
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Best solution

Anonymous
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a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 2:17:21 AM

no worries i got a bit cranky myself.

i believe quite a bit on how far it overclocks is dependant on the chipset as much as the cpu itself and it shows you did some research if you picked the P45 chipset because of that; it does not hit a "wall" or "blank spots" like some other chipsets like the G41. so getting to a 400 fsb speed (1600) is easily attainable if not close to 450 fsb.

though when it comes to the cpu, not all can handle a crazy overclock like that. that is definitely related to what chip and how far it is willing to go without some insane voltages being applied. and looking at this article Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 and E6700 Overclocking it seems the E6700 can go with a FSB of 366 before needing some fine tune tweaking with different voltages; not bad for off the rip.
though before going straight for something like that, its best to find your lowest voltage for the stock setting. that takes a bit of time to go into your bios and lower the voltage, boot up and run prime95 for a few minutes. its best to run prime for longer than that but this is just some preliminary testing you are doing. once you either fail to boot or get errors in prime then you reached the bottom and need to bump the voltage up a step to be stable.

btw, it is a good idea to write down the numbers so you can keep track. and also if you fail to boot, you will need to reset the bios by either a jumper on the board or removing the battery to reset to default settings.

after that its just a matter of bumping up the FSB in smaller increments and testing in prime95. if we use what was achieved in the aforementioned article; the closer you get to a 366 FSB the longer you would want to test in prime95. at first around stock setting a few minutes is fine but you should increase the testing to up to 20 minutes.

you will get errors, then bump up the voltage, test and if passes increase the FSB. wash rinse repeat until the load temps get too high or voltages get towards 1.5 and call it a day. you may end up with 3.66 or you may end up with 4.15 all chip will react different. if you get a 400 FSB; that is a sweet spot so you can link DDR2 800 ram at 1:1.

oh yeah, you ought to unlink the ram and keep that @ 800 or stability sake until you get done testing. :) 


hope i helped.
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July 1, 2012 2:54:01 AM

Best answer selected by thedeathclox.
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July 1, 2012 3:02:11 AM

GOD D*MN IT I ERASED AN ENTIRE PARAGRAPH BECAUSE MY HAND TOUCHED THE TOUCH PAD... ARRGH! Give me a second, Im going to re-write something big. XD.
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July 1, 2012 3:12:48 AM

Okay, this may sound really bad to you, but I've never used Prime95 (or, Memtest86 as a matter of fact..) as I hear they are lengthy testers. The stress and idle the hardware repeatedly for looong times and then give you a report on the hardware. Or, at least thats what I THINK it does. XD. Instead, I would overclock and overvolt when necessary, up to my limit where the system would boot. Then, I would take note of the FSB speed that I was at that allowed booting. Then, of course, under load the OS would hang, and I would turn the FSB down a couple notches. Once I got it stable during full load with many media applications, and heavy CPU stress under games and applications, I would write it off as a success and write down the working values. Of course, If a problem should arise in the future where the CPU still worked to hard and took a fit, i'd knock the FSB down slightly. Ive overclocked 4 different computers like this, both via BIOS and software and its worked just fine for me. (one of them has been overclocked for a few months, another for nearly a year, and I ran a laptop that was consistantly overclocked by about 500MHz on both cores (It was on a yonah.. I f*cking loved that computer.) making an effective "1000MHz" overclock in a way. It ran good and strong like that for 3 years without getting all that hot and running PERFECTLY stable under extreme load. The only reason I left that laptop was for my current one, a CQ56 budget laptop I upgraded. (Turion II P540 2.40GHz, 8GB DDR3, and has an on-board Radeon Mobility HD 4250, which is sufficient. My new desktop specs are in my information tab near the icon.) Should I use Prime95 instead?
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Anonymous
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a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 3:23:51 AM

prime95 will give you a good indication within a few minutes if you have a problem. i really use it more to see what my temps are going be under a higher than normal load. most people suggest to run it overnight; i am not that patient. i feel confident that my rig is ok when i run it for 20 minutes without anything going flonky.

i am sort of like you in that if it is running fine why keep poking it until it breaks; it doesn't need to be perfect to work, i am not at nasa and i am not responsible for the lives of astronauts.
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July 1, 2012 3:51:39 AM

XD Ahh thats awesome! Im definetly going to give Prime95 a good little bit to run. Maybe 20 Minutes like you. :p  Im also not that patient; plus, I dont have nights where the computer is completely untouched. Also, I like to keep tabs on system processes as they go. If something is being tested, I stay for it all to watch for errors or dialogue boxes. I agree 100% with that last sentence. I think people go a little far with their tests. Alsom on a non-CPU related note, I have a WD 2TB Green like you do, but I didn't have a Black available to me as a boot drive. My 2TB is my storage and my OS, and I have an additional 320 Internal, and an external 300. I can also attach a few 80's, a 120 and a 60 if need be.. I have tonnes of Hard drives. However, I installed the 2TB Caviar Green in my current rig and its running pretty slick. Should this be a fine permanent solution for this upcoming rig? Maybe Ill pop some cash for a black someday but is it absolutely necessary to get one NOW? Or will my green keep me happy for now? I will likely use about 250-350GB once all of my stuff is on there, and once I have a crap tonne of downloads that I rarely manage. :p 
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Anonymous
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July 1, 2012 4:05:47 AM

i haven't used a green drive for an OS i had blues before. i got the black because it was a good price where i bought my stuff at when building this. 1 TB just seems too big for just an OS and programs; mostly had 250 Gigs.

hard drives are still really expensive, so when i saw the 2TB green for $60 on craigs list i got it within an hour. i am happy now i have plenty of room for seeding torrents with out it getting in the way of my OS drive.

(disclaimer for a public forum) all my torrents are legal and do not infringe any copyrights!
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July 1, 2012 4:50:19 AM

This is all very awesome stuff, thanks for all your replies! I gotta hit the sack, its 2AM here and im ready to pass out now o~o. I'll P.M. you some time (prolly soon :p ) to chitchat about other technical stuff. Sound cool to you? =3
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