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Last response: in Overclocking
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THGF Needs a Newbie Overclock Guide

Total: 41 votes (7 blank votes)

  • Yes
  • 89 %
  • No
  • 12 %
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 7:44:44 PM

I'm interested in the response regarding a Newbie Overclock Guide, I don't mind investing the time and putting one together, if there's enough interest in having one, the Poll will run for the month of July 2012 to see the interest.

Any specific requests the guide would cover can be addressed in this thread. Ryan

More about : poll vote

a c 150 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:21:09 PM

What is Overclocking?
Why Can't I Overclock on an OEM motherboard?
Can overclocking damage my processor?
Ivybridge OC
Sandybridge OC
Basics on Overclocking
BLCK Overclocking
Turbo Boost Overclocking

A lot to cover! :ouch: 

If everyone can contribute, we can get all of these guides done easily :) 
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:43:31 PM

amuffin said:
What is Overclocking?
Why Can't I Overclock on an OEM motherboard?
Can overclocking damage my processor?
Ivybridge OC
Sandybridge OC
Basics on Overclocking
BLCK Overclocking
Turbo Boost Overclocking

A lot to cover! :ouch: 

If everyone can contribute, we can get all of these guides done easily :) 

can i answer your questions honestly??? :ouch:  easy
Related resources
a c 110 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:44:05 PM

I think it's a great idea and I think it's something that would be welcomed by many, but I agree with muffin. There's a lot to cover for someone that's coming into it without any/much knowledge.
a c 150 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:55:50 PM

xtreme5 said:
can i answer your questions honestly??? :ouch:  easy

Well, remember we got to write these guides to people who are COMPLETELY new to overclocking!
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:57:15 PM

amuffin said:
Well, remember we got to write these guides to people who are COMPLETELY new to overclocking!

indeed.
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 9:59:00 PM

hey, amuffin i don't really understand what the OP mean ??
a c 150 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:21:09 PM

xtreme5 said:
hey, amuffin i don't really understand what the OP mean ??

I think it means Original Poster.
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:24:39 PM

It does, and thanks Ryan for taking the time to write yet another guide :-)
Moto
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:25:58 PM

amuffin said:
I think it means Original Poster.

no mann! i know that, actually i mean what the op say in his question what does he want to do?
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:28:17 PM

Lol, I understand now :-)
Ryan is asking opinions as to if we should write a clocking guide for total newcomers, and if so then what we could include in there
Moto
a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:30:47 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
Lol, I understand now :-)
Ryan is asking opinions as to if we should write a clocking guide for total newcomers, and if so then what we could include in there
Moto

THANKS alot mate! you got me.
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 1, 2012 10:51:03 PM

No probs, :-)
Moto
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 3:28:50 AM

amuffin said:
What is Overclocking?
Why Can't I Overclock on an OEM motherboard?
Can overclocking damage my processor?
Ivybridge OC
Sandybridge OC
Basics on Overclocking
BLCK Overclocking
Turbo Boost Overclocking

A lot to cover! :ouch: 

If everyone can contribute, we can get all of these guides done easily :) 



A newbie guide is not to replace any of the existing guides, it's to get them to the point they can understand them.
a b K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 3:52:30 AM

I actually think it's a good idea as long as we put a big warning they fry their CPU no crying foul LOL!No on a serious note something like Disclaimer

I am not responsible for any bad things that happen to you or your computer as a result of you following this guide, nor is Toms Hardware. My goal is for this guide to be a safe overclocking guideline,Overclocking can damage hardware and in most cases will void your warranties.
Something to that effect you get my point i am sure.
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 6:06:41 AM

All of Ryans guides have a disclaimer anyhow, as do most on here,
'You break it, you deal with it' :p 
Oh, and maybe NOW is a good time to read the sticky we told you about? hehe
Moto
July 2, 2012 1:09:00 PM

4Ryan6 said:
I'm interested in the response regarding a Newbie Overclock Guide, I don't mind investing the time and putting one together, if there's enough interest in having one, the Poll will run for the month of July 2012 to see the interest.

Any specific requests the guide would cover can be addressed in this thread. Ryan


This would be a great idea. I think the major 'road block' I came across with overclocking my 2500k was the lack of motherboard guides. Sure there are a bazillion 2500k guides out there, and all generally the same thing. My issue was your Asus bios, and your MSI bios, are different enough from my Asrock bios to put me in the position where I could not find the answers I needed, or forced me to guess/trial and error. What worked for me took weeks of googling the 2500k and the Asrock z77 extreme4. I think it would go a LONG way if a guide could be put together that gives bios options for each different manufacturer, and maybe going further and having model specific if the board is that popular. That would also help people choose what motherboard may be right for them.
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 1:34:23 PM

Quote:
That would also help people choose what motherboard may be right for them.


Possibly, but you are going a bit far suggesting that people will actually research hardware before they buy and then state they wish to overclock.

Most people building a machine will determine the socket type and RAM supported...maybe how many PCI-e slots and then choose the motherboard that is the most shiny. If you are buying new hardware that hasn't been out long, it might be difficult to find many reviews or end-user experiences/threads.

I agree to a beginner's sticky, but it should be a stepping stone into the normal OC guides as this would be the logical progression once someone understands the basics, they'll naturally wish to move to the more advanced guides.
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 4:20:25 PM

DarkOutlaw said:
This would be a great idea. I think the major 'road block' I came across with overclocking my 2500k was the lack of motherboard guides. Sure there are a bazillion 2500k guides out there, and all generally the same thing. My issue was your Asus bios, and your MSI bios, are different enough from my Asrock bios to put me in the position where I could not find the answers I needed, or forced me to guess/trial and error. What worked for me took weeks of googling the 2500k and the Asrock z77 extreme4. I think it would go a LONG way if a guide could be put together that gives bios options for each different manufacturer, and maybe going further and having model specific if the board is that popular. That would also help people choose what motherboard may be right for them.


My guide for the Sandy Bridge is using the Asrock BIOS!

What would be great is if all motherboard manufacturers would adopt a common BIOS terminology between all motherboards.
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 2, 2012 4:35:30 PM

^ Agreed.

At least BIOS are typically offered by only a handful of vendors that are often used across many manufacturer platforms.
July 2, 2012 5:49:59 PM

4Ryan6 said:
My guide for the Sandy Bridge is using the Asrock BIOS!

What would be great is if all motherboard manufacturers would adopt a common BIOS terminology between all motherboards.


lol, At this point I think it would be great if each manufacturer would use the same terminology for each of there boards. My Asrock is a bit different from your Asrock. I didnt even realize it until you pointed it out.
a b K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 6:48:05 AM

Motopsychojdn said:
All of Ryans guides have a disclaimer anyhow, as do most on here,
'You break it, you deal with it' :p 
Oh, and maybe NOW is a good time to read the sticky we told you about? hehe
Moto
:lol: 
July 3, 2012 9:05:03 AM

i my self am a newbie and think this is a grate idea :) 
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 9:22:19 AM

bigcyco1 said:
I actually think it's a good idea as long as we put a big warning they fry their CPU no crying foul LOL!No on a serious note something like Disclaimer

I am not responsible for any bad things that happen to you or your computer as a result of you following this guide, nor is Toms Hardware. My goal is for this guide to be a safe overclocking guideline,Overclocking can damage hardware and in most cases will void your warranties.
Something to that effect you get my point i am sure.


That's an excellent idea! Thank You
a b K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 9:42:50 AM

4Ryan6 said:
That's an excellent idea! Thank You
Your very welcome! :) 
July 3, 2012 3:28:29 PM

I, too, am a newbie.

"How would I know that I am frying my CPU? Symptoms."

Otherwise, don't sweat it so much.

a c 328 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 4:12:29 PM

Nice member name eXistenZ...very interesting flick.

July 3, 2012 4:36:41 PM

I think the newbie's guide to OCing should be brief overviews of options for OCing an AMD/Intel CPU, one for locked and one for unlocked. Don't go in depth on what the components of OCing actually mean (like what the FSB is, what RAM timings represent, what the HT clock is, etc.), but instead focus on HOW and WHEN to change them. If they want to know the history and engineering aspect of the FSB, they can look it up here on Tom's, but I myself would rather learn HOW now (giving me the knowledge for a basic but serviceable OC) and WHAT later (which will give me the knowledge to create a stellar OC). For example, it took me forever to learn about my Phenom II x4 CPU and how to OC it simply because the guides go in depth on every single aspect of OCing, when in reality, it was very easy to OC my CPU. If it's unlocked, increase the CPU multiplier and up the Vcore, if it's locked, up the FSB. How hard was that? It may not be the best OC ever, but it got me a good 600 MHz bump anyway, so it doesn't need to be for me the newbie. Idk, that's just my take on it, what do you all think?
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 5:53:21 PM

Beginner OC guides should always have a link to the advanced OC guides, since that always seems to be the progression.

Even better, there can be an introduction section with links to various permalinks within the same thread for linking to AMD/Intel clocking basics and then to advanced guides further down in the same thread.
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 7:01:43 PM

Augray37 said:
I think the newbie's guide to OCing should be brief overviews of options for OCing an AMD/Intel CPU, one for locked and one for unlocked. Don't go in depth on what the components of OCing actually mean (like what the FSB is, what RAM timings represent, what the HT clock is, etc.), but instead focus on HOW and WHEN to change them. If they want to know the history and engineering aspect of the FSB, they can look it up here on Tom's, but I myself would rather learn HOW now (giving me the knowledge for a basic but serviceable OC) and WHAT later (which will give me the knowledge to create a stellar OC). For example, it took me forever to learn about my Phenom II x4 CPU and how to OC it simply because the guides go in depth on every single aspect of OCing, when in reality, it was very easy to OC my CPU. If it's unlocked, increase the CPU multiplier and up the Vcore, if it's locked, up the FSB. How hard was that? It may not be the best OC ever, but it got me a good 600 MHz bump anyway, so it doesn't need to be for me the newbie. Idk, that's just my take on it, what do you all think?


My problem is being able to dumb it down so newbies can understand, no offense, most of them don't even know how to enter their BIOS!

Some think they have arrived and their machines are teetering on failure, most are unstable simply because they picked out what they wanted and disregarded the rest of the guide, which was designed and put in the guide to educate them and bring them to a 100% solid and stable overclock in the process.

What's wrong with this picture, give me the quick fix, give me the shortcuts, or better yet just tell me what to set my settings at and I'll be on my way, then "Why is my machine crashing 10 minutes into my favorite game, I followed the guide!", (cough, BS!).

The reason I invest the time and write the guides is to educate, so if you have enough intelligence to read and comprehend you can do it all by yourself, to give you a knowledge base to build your experience on.

Do you think the guide writers took the easy way out, when they invested hours on hours creating them in the first place.

************************************************************************************************

rubix_1011 said:
Beginner OC guides should always have a link to the advanced OC guides, since that always seems to be the progression.

Even better, there can be an introduction section with links to various permalinks within the same thread for linking to AMD/Intel clocking basics and then to advanced guides further down in the same thread.



Good suggestion!
July 3, 2012 8:21:58 PM

@4Ryan6 I guess what I'm saying is I think the guide should focus on the easy stuff, like increasing the CPU multiplier from 16x to 19x in 0.5x increments (I have a Phenom ii x4) and then how to use prime95 when they check for stability and HWmonitor or whatever for temps at each level. Increasing the CPU multiplier alone won't yield the best OC, but it's a relatively safe and easy to understand procedure that doesn't require advanced knowledge of OCing. This part wouldn't delve into anything but a CPU multiplier increase. The next section could be for "so you don't have an unlocked CPU, here's what you can do to get an basic OC." This section would be a bit more in depth, going in to the FSB and whatnot, but not much more. Then the next section could be "Here's how to OC your RAM without frying your motherboard", which would go into RAM timings and so on.

My vision for the guide would be that it start with easy information and easy goals so that the reader can utilize and see what they're reading, gets them excited to see some results and gets more in depth as you move along. You could even link to more detailed articles on a particular subject at certain points. It seems to me that most guides start with difficult concepts and don't let up, and don't give much of a good starting point for the beginner (like me). I'll be the first to admit that I can get easily confused by them, because what I see and what the author sees always seems so different and most guides, from what I can tell, have different takes on the same ideas. Therefore I glean what I can (aka the easy parts) and cautiously move forward in my quest to OC my CPU and learn on my own what works and what doesn't, and many times I don't really know why it does or doesn't. I know the information is in the guides, but I can't find it if I'm always lost.
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 8:32:09 PM

Quote:
Do you think the guide writers took the easy way out, when they invested hours on hours creating them in the first place.


I can't even start to calculate the amount of time I spent putting together the watercooling sticky...let along how many hours I've spent updating, tweaking and trying to include more info. What most people don't know is that the same sticky has been really tweaked, modified and resubmitted about 9 times overall, with countless additions and minor fixes.

So yes, I completely understand when you mention 'Yeah I read the sticky, but just tell me the answers that are otherwise discussed in (said sticky).

You truly cannot help someone that isn't willing to help themselves during the same process.
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 8:36:04 PM

@Augray37

The whole purpose of a newbie guide is to get them to the point they can use the regular guides, thus the comment dumb it down.

a c 110 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 8:36:13 PM

rubix_1011 said:
I can't even start to calculate the amount of time I spent putting together the watercooling sticky...let along how many hours I've spent updating, tweaking and trying to include more info. What most people don't know is that the same sticky has been really tweaked, modified and resubmitted about 9 times overall, with countless additions and minor fixes.


And that's why the people that make guides are saints IMO. It's not an easy thing to do and do well, and the people that do it successfully deserve a lot more credit than they usually get.
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 8:48:31 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Quote:
Do you think the guide writers took the easy way out, when they invested hours on hours creating them in the first place.


I can't even start to calculate the amount of time I spent putting together the watercooling sticky...let along how many hours I've spent updating, tweaking and trying to include more info. What most people don't know is that the same sticky has been really tweaked, modified and resubmitted about 9 times overall, with countless additions and minor fixes.

So yes, I completely understand when you mention 'Yeah I read the sticky, but just tell me the answers that are otherwise discussed in (said sticky).

You truly cannot help someone that isn't willing to help themselves during the same process.


Absolutely!

I commend you for that!

We keep our stickies updated, unfortunately, not every sticky at THGF is kept updated.
July 3, 2012 8:49:33 PM

4Ryan6 said:
@Augray37

The whole purpose of a newbie guide is to get them to the point they can use the regular guides, thus the comment dumb it down.


Ok. I was just commenting on what I thought might be a good way to go about it, that's all.
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 3, 2012 10:00:30 PM

It's much easier to keep a sticky updated than to continually re-hash the same questions over and over and over and over and over...

Even with the sticky, this happens; I can't imagine how bad it would be if it didn't exist.
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 4, 2012 10:38:06 AM

rubix_1011 said:
It's much easier to keep a sticky updated than to continually re-hash the same questions over and over and over and over and over...

Even with the sticky, this happens; I can't imagine how bad it would be if it didn't exist.


There's the difference between those after a quick fix, and those with a desire to learn!

Questions are more direct to the point coming from those that actually read the guides and get stumped on a specific thing that they need clarifying about, and most of those do not post out here, they PM the writer of the guide to have those questions answered.

Those PMs help the writer of the guide to see where we may need to edit the guide to make it clearer for the reader to fully understand, I've reread and edited my guides many times from questions I received in PMs that needed clarification in the guide, to make it easier to understand.

One of the reasons I wrote my guides was to avoid the endless questions, that's why out here I tend to avoid the questions I know the guide covers, simply because I've already done my part to answer those questions.




a c 235 K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 10:20:54 AM

4Ryan6 said:
Any specific requests the guide would cover can be addressed in this thread. Ryan


What I meant by that sentence was what information would a newbie (meaning completely new to overclocking), need to have covered to get them to the point they can understand the terminology of a written guide.

For example; When some of you throw out FSB, they don't have a clue as to what that is, they don't know that FSB stands for Front Side Bus, and they also don't know what Front Side Bus is!

The suggestions for what the guide would cover need to be brought down to much lower of an education level so they can grasp the sheer basics that most take for granted, but a newbie is completely clueless about.

Does that clear up what a newbie guide is for?
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 10:32:55 AM

Entering your BIOS setup:
Auto Overclock Options:
Manual overclock settings:
Understanding the settings available to you:
Settings Explained:
Saving your settings and exiting the BIOS:
Testing your settings from desktop boot stable to operating system 100% stability:


These are the things a newbie needs to know guys! Ry
a c 328 K Overclocking
July 8, 2012 3:05:30 AM

Please don't hijack threads.

If you need a thread addressed for content, behavior or other issues, please PM a moderator.
a c 150 K Overclocking
July 8, 2012 6:10:48 AM

We need more photos in the WC sticky on how to install everything.
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 8, 2012 7:18:01 AM

Read my Sig Muffin....
*Edit, old Sig>
Once you start watercooling, you are almost automatically inducted into the modding circles as well, because theres rarely a 'from the box, fits everyone' solution, its your ingenuity and resourcefulness that makes it all happen,**
a large part of W/c involves the user being a reasonable level of savvy,
and if one can assemble a Pc then I would assume they had the requisite knowledge of basic tools and ability to work out how/where a radiator or pump is going to live,
the other side of that is of course the many variables, I could do an Xspc Rs240 install guide but anyone blindly following it will hit a wall when their case doesn't allow them to fit the rad where I do, or doesn't have the two bays spare for the res,
some parts are universal to a degree, but every situation is different
Moto
a c 235 K Overclocking
July 8, 2012 1:18:39 PM

I thought this thread was a poll for the newbie guide to overclocking, I must have taken a wrong turn somewhere! Ryan
a c 190 K Overclocking
July 8, 2012 1:46:16 PM

Apologies Ry, W/c sticky, O/c sticky my brain gets confused :p 
Moto
!