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RAID 0 Mirroring, Is it Possible?

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December 5, 2011 12:36:06 AM

I am a RAID newbie, and if you respond in this thread, please direct me to any online tutorials you find relevant and educational.

My new system which is going to be built shortly will encompass a 128GB SSD for the boot drive, 2x1TB SATA III/6.0 Drives (currently earmarked to be set up in RAID 1) for Misc Programs and permanent database and video files, and a single 2TB Drive for download/scratch and temporary files.

My question is: Is it possible and more effective to set up the 2x1TB drives as RAID 0 for additional speed, and acquire a third 1TB Drive to mirror the data content of the RAID 0 drive? The goal of these drives is integrity and speed. Do not want to be bottlenecked by the HDD during video encoding. It would be real comforting to have that 3rd 1TB drive as the mirror in this scenario.

Also, while I am sure the Motherboard I will get will have on board RAID management, I am happy to take recommendations for a PCI/E independent USER FRIENDLY RAID Controller. System will use Windows, don't hate.

Thank you in advance!

More about : raid mirroring

December 5, 2011 12:45:01 AM

And I have done my research, from what I understand I do not mean to suggest I want a RAID 1+0, I dont even need the backups from the RAID 0 disks to be simltaneous. Automated backup is more than sufficient, and I just prefer the drive to be internal. Software recomendations for this are welcome.
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December 5, 2011 12:51:08 AM

You won't be able to mirror the whole RAID0 array as it will be 2TB I think you would be looking for RAID 5?

Personally I have only had bad experiences using consumer based raid cards / on-board. You gotta remember if you have a raid CARD failure you need to be able to replace the card (AFAIK you will need the exact same RAID card as the old one)

By all means use the RAID 0 array and use the 3rd drive as a backup. And just backup the stuff you need at night using rsync (or similar)

I have used software RAID in linux which seems to work fine but I never got to test what happens during a failure...
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December 5, 2011 12:52:33 AM

There is one, Puresync, that allow folder backup and it is free. I've used it some time ago and it had no trouble mirroring folder from my array to any other location I wanted to.

I just updated my RAID array, and I've yet to create any backup procedure.. just keeping the faith on my array since I've used RAID 0 for now almost 10 years and never had an array to fail.

In the Christmas holiday, I will take the time to to create backup. Not That I have important stuff on my array, but still has some value to me..
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December 5, 2011 1:08:22 AM

What RAID hardware are you using? Just for the sake of OP
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December 5, 2011 1:21:21 AM

As mentioned the Raid hardware will likely be from the motherboard, but if a single RAID card that runs under $100 is available and considerably better than traditional motherboard I am definately open ears.
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Best solution

December 5, 2011 1:24:53 AM

wshinds said:
And I have done my research, from what I understand I do not mean to suggest I want a RAID 1+0, I dont even need the backups from the RAID 0 disks to be simltaneous. Automated backup is more than sufficient, and I just prefer the drive to be internal. Software recomendations for this are welcome.


I run an SSD for my OS and RAID 0 with 4 250GB drives for data. This makes for 1TB of data and I use a single 1.5TB external drive for weekly differential backups with Acronis True Image. You could do a similar system with an internal drive.

Edit: I should be honest and say I use "dynamic disks" with windows 7 ultimate.
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December 5, 2011 1:37:15 AM

spasmolytic46 said:
I run an SSD for my OS and RAID 0 with 4 250GB drives for data. This makes for 1TB of data and I use a single 1.5TB external drive for weekly differential backups with Acronis True Image. You could do a similar system with an internal drive.

Edit: I should be honest and say I use "dynamic disks" with windows 7 ultimate.
Spaz, never done RAID before, good performance on those drives? My dual RAID 0 drives will be SATA III/6.0 GB, probably Caviar Black. Is that overkill?
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December 5, 2011 1:43:50 AM

wshinds said:
Spaz, never done RAID before, good performance on those drives? My dual RAID 0 drives will be SATA III/6.0 GB, probably Caviar Black. Is that overkill?


Since I know you do video editing with large files, I say those drives are great for your situation, but I would do some research on your motherboards RAID controller. The one on mine s*** eggs. So I went with dynamic disks in windows 7 and got better results. There are some good hardware RAID cards out there, but they aren't cheap. They also can be picky about drives they play with and motherboard compatibility.
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December 5, 2011 1:49:40 AM

spasmolytic46 said:
Since I know you do video editing with large files, I say those drives are great for your situation, but I would do some research on your motherboards RAID controller. The one on mine s*** eggs. So I went with dynamic disks in windows 7 and got better results. There are some good hardware RAID cards out there, but they aren't cheap. They also can be picky about drives they play with and motherboard compatibility.
That is my exact concern regarding the hardware raid cards, they seem either hit OR miss, with little or no grey area. Probably a great area to go into business on! Have a resource on these Dynamic Disks? I will google them but I doubt the results will be practical.
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December 5, 2011 2:04:10 AM

wshinds said:
That is my exact concern regarding the hardware raid cards, they seem either hit OR miss, with little or no grey area. Probably a great area to go into business on! Have a resource on these Dynamic Disks? I will google them but I doubt the results will be practical.


It's basically a software RAID solution. You use a little processor power and RAM instead of having a piece of hardware dedicated to it.

this is basic explanation http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc737048%28W...
it seems to be geared for the windows servers, but I have it in Win 7 ultimate

and this is a simple how to for Win XP Pro
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309044
It's basically the same procedure.

EDIT: Just a reminder to make sure you have good backups before playing with your hard drives.
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a b G Storage
December 5, 2011 2:33:02 AM

Caviar Blacks are a waste of money--especially right now. You'd get MUCH better performance with a single SSD and a data drive (such as a 2TB external cracked to save cash).

Btw, you lose TRIM support with RAID on SSDs...for now.
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December 5, 2011 3:06:17 AM

dalauder said:
Caviar Blacks are a waste of money--especially right now. You'd get MUCH better performance with a single SSD and a data drive (such as a 2TB external cracked to save cash).

Btw, you lose TRIM support with RAID on SSDs...for now.

He is going to use an SSD for his boot device and is using large capacity HDD for video editing. Large storage capacity SSD's are not cheaper than multiple hdd's in RAID.
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a b G Storage
December 5, 2011 3:39:28 AM

spasmolytic46 said:
If you'd read his post and this thread you would see he is using SSD for his boot device and is using large capacity HDD for video editing. Large storage capacity SSD's are not cheaper than multiple hdd's in RAID.
You're right, I skipped his first two paragraphs. I still think Caviar Blacks are a waste of money. That's why I own 4 Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB's. I use 3 in RAID 0/RAID 5 (see my sig).

OP--how big of files do you write to the HDDs? If it's smaller than 50GB, you may want to write directly to the SSD and copy it later.

Like mentioned earlier, RAID 5 would provide the redundancy you were asking about, but it doesn't give quite RAID 0 performance. If you want, you could always partition the RAID array like I do (not the perfect setup though) so that the RAID 5 partition is plenty big enough to have the RAID 0 partition backed up to it. Then you can do data storage on the RAID 5 array with redundancy.
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December 5, 2011 3:55:32 AM

Best answer selected by wshinds.
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December 5, 2011 3:56:47 AM

dalauder said:
You're right, I skipped his first two paragraphs. I still think Caviar Blacks are a waste of money. That's why I own 4 Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB's. I use 3 in RAID 0/RAID 5 (see my sig).

OP--how big of files do you write to the HDDs? If it's smaller than 50GB, you may want to write directly to the SSD and copy it later.

Like mentioned earlier, RAID 5 would provide the redundancy you were asking about, but it doesn't give quite RAID 0 performance. If you want, you could always partition the RAID array like I do (not the perfect setup though) so that the RAID 5 partition is plenty big enough to have the RAID 0 partition backed up to it. Then you can do data storage on the RAID 5 array with redundancy.


BAARF or Battle Against Any RAID Five

http://www.miracleas.com/BAARF/RAID5_versus_RAID10.txt
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a b G Storage
December 5, 2011 4:23:02 AM

Spasmolytic46, you're right. I shouldn't mention RAID 5 so casually without calling attention to its drawbacks (hey, that article is about SCSI, not SATA). The OP initially described RAID 5 though, which is why I mentioned it. RAID 10's a better choice, which is what I'd have done if I'd had enough disks initially.

Eventually I'll get a 3TB drive when they drop to $75 or so and dump all my data to it so I can abandon this RAID 5. But right now I'm stuck with it and it performs alright.
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