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Getting new RAM PROBLEM! HELP please!!

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July 4, 2012 4:52:00 PM

Hello,
I am planning on getting new memory for my gaming PC, i am currently on 4gb( 2 x 2gb) and would like to upgrade to (2 x 4gb)= 8gb. The problems is that my mobo (MS-7613 (Iona-GL8E) only states that it has PC3-10600 (DDR3-1333) PC3-8500 (DDR3-1066) DIM types.

I want to get RAM that is 12800 1600MHz DDR3 e.g corsair vengeance 240-pin.

Q. Will my motherboard support it? or will it only run at 1333MHz?
or will it just not work?

I need all the help i can get, thanks in advance and if you need any more specs please ask.

I have a 64-bit Windows 7
Dual channel memory architecture
Supports DDR3 DIMs only
Non-ECC memory only, unbuffered (dont really know what that means)

More about : ram problem

a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 5:28:15 AM

it will run at 1333, but the difference is so slight it wont really matter
Related resources
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 4:51:26 PM

yeah that will work, but a year ago that same kit was $35 in a local store near me, so dunno what happened to the prices
a c 81 } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 5:11:41 PM

crucial has an online memory scanner that will read your pc info and pop up some ram that will work in your pc. it up to the memory controller on the mb if faster ram will clock down and work. there not much in way of speed from 1333 or 1600.
if the memory scanner does show 1600 ram then you should be fine.

edit nna2 ...it went up because elipa (sp) one of the big ram vendor went under a few months ago. it was just bought out by micron. so there one less vendor to force ram prices down. it like hard drives now there only two main vendors now.
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 5, 2012 5:22:21 PM

smorizio said:
crucial has an online memory scanner that will read your pc info and pop up some ram that will work in your pc. it up to the memory controller on the mb if faster ram will clock down and work. there not much in way of speed from 1333 or 1600.
if the memory scanner does show 1600 ram then you should be fine.

edit nna2 ...it went up because elipa (sp) one of the big ram vendor went under a few months ago. it was just bought out by micron. so there one less vendor to force ram prices down. it like hard drives now there only two main vendors now.


that would make sense, thanks for that info :p 
July 6, 2012 9:22:07 AM

thanks guys your info was really helpfull! ;D

One more question: if i can get 1333MHz 10600 DIMs should i get them or the 1600Mhz 12800?

Thanks,
a c 81 } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 9:37:04 AM

there not much of a speed change from 1066 or 1333 or 1600. 533/677/800. the 800 ram will be a little faster but in most aps and games your not going to see that speed diff. most time it show up on when you do how fast is my pc.
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 4:33:16 PM

if the 1333MHz dimms are cheaper, get those
July 6, 2012 10:48:16 PM

Thanks to everyone who posted here :D 

Thread closed
July 7, 2012 2:15:35 AM

I'm surprised no one mentioned the RAM timings. 1600 RAM may be able to pull off better timings when underclocked. That's something to consider. 1600 with the same specked timings as a 1300 RAM may be able to squeeze out better timings when underclocked. Has anyone tried this? Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAS_latency for a good chart on performance vs clock and frequency.

Thread almost closed :) 
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 2:33:03 AM

Pearlmam said:
I'm surprised no one mentioned the RAM timings. 1600 RAM may be able to pull off better timings when underclocked. That's something to consider. 1600 with the same specked timings as a 1300 RAM may be able to squeeze out better timings when underclocked. Has anyone tried this? Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAS_latency for a good chart on performance vs clock and frequency.

Thread almost closed :) 


Quote:
There are very small real-life differences in performance between low clock frequency/fast timing Winbond memory and high clock frequency/relaxed timing Samsung memory. This is true in 3DMark01 and SuperPI even for CPU/memory intensive applications.

from an article on here
July 7, 2012 4:52:07 AM

that doesnt address faster clock faster timing memory. The chart on the wiki page reinforces what you said, but you are missing the fact that faster timings AND clock is better.

And one more thing,

"there not much of a speed change from 1066 or 1333 or 1600. 533/677/800. the 800 ram will be a little faster but in most aps and games your not going to see that speed diff. most time it show up on when you do how fast is my pc." -- smorizio

This sort of logic goes against my instinct so I decided to do some quick research. For many applications, Memory is the bottleneck in the computer, whether it be volatile or non-volatile. That tells me that slight increases in RAM performance are big gains in the computer performance.

This reference reinforces what smorzo said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/bulldozer-ddr3-over...

This really upsets me, and I find it hard to believe, but there it is. I am not familiar with all of their tests, but it seems that they didn't do the test that would benefit most from fast memory: One with many cache misses, and huge memory usage. Scientific applications would probably benefit most from fast RAM, which was not included.

Most people wont benefit from faster RAM, which the study points out. But people with scientific applications would see huge gains from fast RAM. (my opinion and needs a source)
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 4:55:57 AM

he is planning to use this for gaming, not synthetic benchmarks

they are using sandra, which will show a difference, but pull up a game, or an everyday application and you will never tell the difference
July 7, 2012 3:31:03 PM

nna2 said:
he is planning to use this for gaming, not synthetic benchmarks

they are using sandra, which will show a difference, but pull up a game, or an everyday application and you will never tell the difference


True. I hate to admit it. However, you make it sound like RAM ONLY helps synthetic benchmarks, which is untrue. Anyone wanting to run scientific computations (which the OP hasn't mentioned he will) may see a good boost in performance like the study showed for the Sandra benchmark. Of course, it seems that you need the "perfect problem" to get the most benefit.

thread closed for me :)  Thank you all.

a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 7:01:16 PM

oh yeah, and btw, ECC means that the ram is capable of error correcting, but most consumer systems cannot support it
!