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Using WAP to bridge cable modem to Wireless Router

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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March 15, 2010 10:40:23 PM

Hey All,

I have an internet connection in a room that has no computers. I want to place a WAP in that room and connect it to the cable modem.

I have another room with a printer and two computers. I want to place a wireless router in there and use the ethernet to attach the three devices.

Will the router be able to administer the internet connection? I am afraid that I need to physically connect the cable modem to a router for it to work, but I am hoping that I am wrong.

Also, will the router to WAP cause a significant degredation in internet access speeds? I will be limited to one G connection to the internet for all my devices, yes? (Both the WAP and the router are G.)

P.S. I don't have the model numbers in front of me, but this is fairly close:

http://en-us-support.belkin.com/app/product/detail/p/37...
Belkin Wireless G router

http://en-us-support.belkin.com/app/product/detail/p/43...
Belkin Wireless G Universal Range Extender
March 16, 2010 2:32:12 AM

Let’s consider your suggestion.

[modem]<-- wire -->[wap (ap mode)]<-- wireless -->[wireless ethernet bridge]<-- wire -->[wireless router]

You face a couple obstacles. You don’t have a wireless Ethernet bridge at the moment (well you do, but it’s in use w/ the modem). But sometimes a wireless router can be converted into a wireless Ethernet bridge (aka client mode). Unfortunately, you don’t have such a wireless router either.

The other option is to wirelessly bridge to the wireless router:

[modem]<-- wire -->[wireless router]<-- wireless -->[wap (repeater)]<-- wire -->[switch]

Now all you need is a simple switch to support your multiple wired clients. Certainly cheaper than digging up another wireless Ethernet bridge. Wireless clients can then choose the AP they prefer (although those choosing the WAP over the wireless router will see their bandwidth cut in HALF due to the need to make two wireless hops).

As far as the performance impact, it should be negligible since ISP speeds are typically far less than what your wireless G connection is capable of. I would still prefer wired connections whenever possible simply because they're less hassle and more reliable. But as configured in my second example, wireless clients using the wireless router as their AP are no worse off than any other wireless client. The only really downside to this whole scheme is that even wired clients must ultimately rely on a wireless connection (wap<->wireless router) for Internet access. But at least your wired clients maintain FULL performance among themselves.


March 16, 2010 6:51:04 PM

Eibgrad,

Thank you for the good response. Based on the lack of the wireless ethernet bridge, I am assuming that my best bet is just to break out the drill and run a wire between rooms. I was hoping to avoid it, but I actually like drilling and playing with wires, so at least now I know I have an excuse.

March 16, 2010 7:15:08 PM

xzJoel said:
Eibgrad,

Thank you for the good response. Based on the lack of the wireless ethernet bridge, I am assuming that my best bet is just to break out the drill and run a wire between rooms. I was hoping to avoid it, but I actually like drilling and playing with wires, so at least now I know I have an excuse.


Well, you could consider a powerline solution in lieu of wire.

[modem]<-- wire -->[powerline adapter #1]<-- power lines -->[powerline adapter #2]<-- wire -->[wireless router]

Unfortunately powerline isn't all that cheap, but once in a blue moon you do find a great deal:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Normally you'd paid $40 or more for just one, simple powerline adapter. In this case you get two, one of which is a full blown wireless G router. OTOH, because wiring varies so widely from home to home, some w/ more electrical noise than others, perhaps outlets on different circuits, etc., performance varies widely, or might not work at all. But when it does work, it’s simple and tends to be more reliable than wireless.

It’s certainly preferable to use plain ol’ ethernet cable whenever possible, and it’s dirt cheap. But I thought I would at least mention powerline as a possibility. It’s your call of course.
!