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Wireless Router downstream of switch

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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March 15, 2010 10:51:02 PM

Hello,

I hope somebody can help me. I'm currently on a network connected to a switch, connected to a dsl modem. We have a static ip address for the dsl.

I want to add a Rosewill wireless router ( RNX-GX4) downstream from the swtich. I will connect a computer via ethernet to the router and connect wireless devices to the router.

I have tried to fumble through the settings to connect the wireless router, but haven't had much luck. The router ip address is: 64.170.212.105

I've tried to connect the wireless router with the Static option (as apposed to DHCP, PPPoE). How should I configure this.

I guess as a secondary option, I could just get rid of the switch, and use the wireless router, but it's preferable to go through the switch.

Here is my preferred setup:
Swtich
|
Wireless router \ other computers (wired to switch)
|
Computer (wired to wireless router} \ music streaming device \ laptop
March 16, 2010 1:17:08 AM

Normally the modem is patched directly to the router, LAN to WLAN, respectively.

[modem](lan)<-- wire -->(wan)[router]<-- wire/wireless -->[pc]

Having a switch in between them is pointless since any computers connected to that switch won’t have Internet access. They wouldn’t have access to computers behind the router either since the router’s firewall blocks access. The whole point of the router is to make Internet access available by sharing the single (and apparently static in your case) public IP. That public IP is assigned to the router's WAN IP. Now all the computers BEHIND the router are on the same network (typically 192.168.1.x) and share the Internet.

So something just doesn't make sense here. If the only things attached to the switch were the modem and router, it would work, but it just wouldn't serve any purpose.

When configuring DSL, you can specify the WAN connection type as either static IP, or PPPoE if it requires a username/password.

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March 18, 2010 7:57:34 PM

Eibgrad,

Thanks for the reply. I was trying to add my wireless router to my existing network, behind the switch. Similar to:

http://www.terryscomputertips.com/computers/adding-a-wi...

However, I guess I could get rid of the switch all together (I sort of wanted to keep it, more ethernet ports, but not a big deal).
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March 18, 2010 10:08:42 PM

bcg said:
Eibgrad,

Thanks for the reply. I was trying to add my wireless router to my existing network, behind the switch. Similar to:

http://www.terryscomputertips.com/computers/adding-a-wi...

However, I guess I could get rid of the switch all together (I sort of wanted to keep it, more ethernet ports, but not a big deal).


I wasn't suggesting you can't or shouldn't use the switch. I agree, the switch would be useful for adding more ports. My argument was WHERE you were placing that switch, on the WAN side of the router. You certainly can do that, but I just don't understand why you wouldn't put the switch BEHIND the router to add those ports to its switch and a) place all computers and devices on the same network (the one behind the router) and b) thus provide internet access to all computers and devices.

[modem](lan)<-- wire -->(wan)[router]<-- wire -->[switch]

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March 18, 2010 10:15:59 PM

Aha. Got it. That does make more sense. Thanks.
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March 29, 2010 5:34:02 PM

Best answer selected by bcg.
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