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TIM on GPU's

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July 6, 2012 10:30:10 AM

Hi

I'm about to try watercooling for the first time and wanted some advice on applying TIM. I use the single blob method with CPU's and it works well for me on Sandy Bridge CPU's (single smallish blob on middle then let pressure spread it out).

I was wondering if it is the same with gpu's? Are GPU's larger than CPU's (have not got stock air cooler off yet)? I saw a video where the chap used a central blob of TIM then four more towards the corners of the GPU. This seemed a lot of TIM to me but perhaps GPU's need more. I'm aiming to get this right first time as refitting a waterblock to change the amount of TIM later looks very time consuming.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Regards

Mag

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a b à CPUs
a c 330 K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 2:04:09 PM

Same method of application, you really shouldn't need much more than usual...I generally shoot for the same quantity as a CPU cooler mount.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 6, 2012 2:09:54 PM

I generally use a star or X application, but it doesn't really matter. Much easier than the hand-spreading I used to do :) 

Just make sure you use a non-conductive TIM like Arctic MX-2 or MX-4. I've used both on all my GPUs and they perform similarly to other TIMs. You can also use it more places since it's non-conductive - I have gotten it all over my PCBs before and everything's run perfectly in all my PCs *knocks on wood*
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July 7, 2012 8:14:07 AM

rubix_1011 said:
Same method of application, you really shouldn't need much more than usual...I generally shoot for the same quantity as a CPU cooler mount.

Thanks Rubix for your prompt reply. I'll continue with my existing method then as it seems to work.

Regards

Mag
July 7, 2012 8:19:20 AM

boiler1990 said:
I generally use a star or X application, but it doesn't really matter. Much easier than the hand-spreading I used to do :) 

Just make sure you use a non-conductive TIM like Arctic MX-2 or MX-4. I've used both on all my GPUs and they perform similarly to other TIMs. You can also use it more places since it's non-conductive - I have gotten it all over my PCBs before and everything's run perfectly in all my PCs *knocks on wood*


Thanks for your reply. The instructions with my EK waterblocks suggested a cross pattern but I have not heard of this before. I've got some MX-2 which I've used on CPU's with no problem so I'll use that.

I've been researching this watercooling idea for two weeks now and I find it fascinating. I think I now know enough to buy the rest of the parts safely and get on with building it.

Thanks again

Mag
a c 190 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 8:37:47 AM

The application method is mostly the same. As boiler said, just make sure that it's non-conductive. It's also important to make sure that it's non-capacitive as well. Arctic Silver 5 is non-conductive but is mildly capacitive due to the use of silver. The capacitive properties could cause problems if the material gets in between some traces. This is not a problem with CPUs due to the way they are designed but many GPUs are less forgiving. Purely ceramic paste is neither capacitive nor conductive and can be used if desired.
July 7, 2012 9:37:55 AM

Pinhedd said:
The application method is mostly the same. As boiler said, just make sure that it's non-conductive. It's also important to make sure that it's non-capacitive as well. Arctic Silver 5 is non-conductive but is mildly capacitive due to the use of silver. The capacitive properties could cause problems if the material gets in between some traces. This is not a problem with CPUs due to the way they are designed but many GPUs are less forgiving. Purely ceramic paste is neither capacitive nor conductive and can be used if desired.

Thanks for your reply. The instructions with my EK waterblocks suggested either MX-2 or MX-4. I've got some MX-2 so could use that. Is this ok from a capacitative perspective? I must admit I'd not heard of this term but I've only ever used TIM with CPU's before whereas you say GPU's are a little different.

Thanks again

Mag
a c 190 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
July 7, 2012 9:49:44 AM

MX-4 would be preferable by MX-2 will work just fine. Both of them are non-conductive and non-capacitive. AS5 would be a little better but it is slightly capacitive and thus requires a bit more care.
July 7, 2012 10:39:43 AM

Pinhedd said:
MX-4 would be preferable by MX-2 will work just fine. Both of them are non-conductive and non-capacitive. AS5 would be a little better but it is slightly capacitive and thus requires a bit more care.

Thanks again for your help. I' about to post a q
July 7, 2012 10:41:41 AM

Pinhedd said:
MX-4 would be preferable by MX-2 will work just fine. Both of them are non-conductive and non-capacitive. AS5 would be a little better but it is slightly capacitive and thus requires a bit more care.

Thanks for your help again. I'm about to post a new query about water delta - you seem to know your technical stuff so could you have a look?

Regards

Mag
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