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Help needed bleeding first loop

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July 17, 2012 12:34:34 AM

Hi All

I've just finished my first loop and after tightening up a couple of jubilee clips it seems watertight so far. However I need some help bleeding the loop. I'm using the XSPC reservoir top for Laing D5 with a D5 vario installed. It is very noisy so far. The pump does not seem to be vibrating so I think it is turbulence caused by air in the loop - its mainly a grinding sort of noise. I've tried rocking the case to free bubbles but it does not seem to have done much. Reports I have read on this combination of pump and res top suggest it should be very quiet.

Has anyone any experience with this reservoir who can suggest a good way of bleeding it. My radiator has a bleed screw but when I opened this water came out the top of the reservoir! I am currently running the loop with the reservoir cap off if that is of any relevance. I also notice the inlet tube in the reservoir finishes very close to the mouth of the pump.

Thanks in advance

Mag

More about : needed bleeding loop

a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2012 4:24:52 AM

Most likely the noise you are hearing really is the trapped air...

I have not personally worked with this loop but I can tell you that you will need to tip the case or your WC loop and setup from side to side for a while...it will take about 20min - 1hour to get this done depending on the loop and situation.

I recommend you watch some youtube videos to get a general idea on how to get the air bubbles out. I know they won't be the same as your loop and config, but they should give you the general idea or understanding on how to correctly fill up your loop with watter or coolant...

here are a few:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=777JcqPVgLU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7k_rbibxHA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjqO70F4Nno

Hope this helps! ;) 
a c 150 K Overclocking
July 17, 2012 5:13:18 AM

MagR said:
Hi All

I've just finished my first loop and after tightening up a couple of jubilee clips it seems watertight so far. However I need some help bleeding the loop. I'm using the XSPC reservoir top for Laing D5 with a D5 vario installed. It is very noisy so far. The pump does not seem to be vibrating so I think it is turbulence caused by air in the loop - its mainly a grinding sort of noise. I've tried rocking the case to free bubbles but it does not seem to have done much. Reports I have read on this combination of pump and res top suggest it should be very quiet.

Has anyone any experience with this reservoir who can suggest a good way of bleeding it. My radiator has a bleed screw but when I opened this water came out the top of the reservoir! I am currently running the loop with the reservoir cap off if that is of any relevance. I also notice the inlet tube in the reservoir finishes very close to the mouth of the pump.

Thanks in advance

Mag

Is it this dual bay res?

I've got one and I can help you bleed out the air.
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a c 150 K Overclocking
July 17, 2012 7:57:04 AM

I would change your pump speed to a lower setting, my alphacool VPP655T is set from 5 to 2.

In order to bleed to loop cycle the system on and off while moving the case back in forth, while doing this you want to have the fill port unscrewed so you can agitate and get rid of the air bubbles. While doing this, add some distilled water so you can fill the space of the previous air bubble.
a c 330 K Overclocking
July 17, 2012 1:36:13 PM

This is also a very common filling method for almost every loop.

Very rarely do you just turn it on and fill it up and let it just run. You will likely need to cycle the power on and off several times to refill the reservoir when the pump pushes the water into the loop. The trick is to keep stopping and adding water so the pump never sucks air.
July 17, 2012 2:50:07 PM

rubix_1011 said:
This is also a very common filling method for almost every loop.

Very rarely do you just turn it on and fill it up and let it just run. You will likely need to cycle the power on and off several times to refill the reservoir when the pump pushes the water into the loop. The trick is to keep stopping and adding water so the pump never sucks air.



Agreed! Once the main bubbles are gone, you will still experience some issues with microbubbles, that will not leave the system unless the system has an opportunity to gas out the microbubbles by shutting down and letting them re-accumulate. Then turn it back on, and fill the void with solution or distilled as needed. Shut your computer down every night for a few evenings, and restart in the AM. It will clear up soon :) 

CJ
July 17, 2012 4:42:42 PM

Hi All

Thanks for all the replies. I followed the suggestion to turn my pump speed down. I used a setting of 2 (had to improvise a tool to get at the dial in the bay reservoir). I spent quite a while shaking the case and radiator (which is not attached to the case) and a lot of air was dislodged. The noise disappeared completely and the pump ran as near silent as I could imagine.

The problem came when I turned the speed back up. The noise came back although nowhere near as bad as the initial volume. I'm sitting next to it now and am getting what I would describe as an intermittent spitting sound. I am still seeing very small bubbles rise to the surface every now and then.

Am I now at the microbubble stage which will go if I leave the loop to stand overnight after a few days as one reply suggested? Is it alright to leave the speed setting on 5 from now on?

Your help has been greatly appreciated already. I'm now confident I haven't got any slow leaks (system has been running for hours) and will be testing my temps soon hopefully.

Regards

Mag
July 17, 2012 4:51:19 PM

MagR said:
Hi All

Thanks for all the replies. I followed the suggestion to turn my pump speed down. I used a setting of 2 (had to improvise a tool to get at the dial in the bay reservoir). I spent quite a while shaking the case and radiator (which is not attached to the case) and a lot of air was dislodged. The noise disappeared completely and the pump ran as near silent as I could imagine.

The problem came when I turned the speed back up. The noise came back although nowhere near as bad as the initial volume. I'm sitting next to it now and am getting what I would describe as an intermittent spitting sound. I am still seeing very small bubbles rise to the surface every now and then.

Am I now at the microbubble stage which will go if I leave the loop to stand overnight after a few days as one reply suggested? Is it alright to leave the speed setting on 5 from now on?

Your help has been greatly appreciated already. I'm now confident I haven't got any slow leaks (system has been running for hours) and will be testing my temps soon hopefully.

Regards

Mag


If you are still hearing a noise, it means you still have pockets of air. Microbubbles wount make localized noise, but they will be audible especially through the pump itself. if you are hearing noise, and can (probably) localize it to the radiator(s) you can at speed 5 continue to rock the case on all 3 axis (careful not to introduce more air through the resevoir) to dislodge the bubbles...then just go through shutdowns > run > shutdowns till the noise is gone completely. The bubbles will eventually go away, assuming you are not sucking air into the pump ever...

CJ
a c 330 K Overclocking
July 17, 2012 4:52:24 PM

What you are getting is either air bubbles being sucked back through the loop or cavitation from the pump impeller. Make sure your reservoir is full and your pump inlet is far enough below the water level that it isn't creating suction to pull in air. Either fill the reservoir as full as possible or turn down the pump speed...or both.
a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2012 12:47:27 AM

hell i just let the main pockets of air get out then just let the pump run while i play BF3. never gave me a problem.
a c 150 K Overclocking
July 18, 2012 1:38:50 AM

You don't need that high of a setting to push the water.
!