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OVERCLOCK FX 4100 ???

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July 18, 2012 6:14:12 AM

HELLO , just got fx 4100, i want to overclock this processor, target is 4.5 or 4.6ghz(it is stable i saw a few others), my MOBO IS "ASUS M5A 78L-M LX AM3+" , the processor is running fine and cool on the default clock speed of 3.6ghz , guys i not into much of overclocking , but i want to overclock this processor,but with the experience that you guys have got , please mention where to go and what settings to apply in the bios what to turn on /off,,,,everything .Please reply to this message in the simple language so that i could understand.. hope you have a good day .. and please reply to me...

More about : overclock 4100

a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2012 12:09:21 PM

turn turbo boost off
(optional) turn Cool N' Quiet off, though it dosen't matter that much

if you want 4.5 then go into your overclocking menu, and change the CPU multiplier to 22.5, and play around with the VCore till it's stable

do you have an aftermarket cooler? if not, good luck :) 
a c 229 À AMD
a c 210 K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 2:05:09 PM

You need something besides stock cooling to overclock the FX series.
a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 6:35:15 PM

I just overclocked a friend's FX-4100 to 4.4Ghz on stock voltage.

It was pretty straightforward with the exception of the throttling issue.

1) Download HWmonitor, CPUZ, and prime95 so that you can monitor temps, voltages and clock speed under full load.

HWmonitor tends to read core temps lower than they actually are so I used AMD overdrive to identify which temp on HWmonitor represented my CPU temp. (Overdrive seems to read core temps correctly, but I would not use it for overclocking)

2) Run prime 95 small fft's for max heat and observe both your CPU temp (HWmonitor or AMD overdrive) and your clock speed. (CPUZ) The stock cooler allowed my sample to get to 60C in less than 10 minutes. (and that was at lower-than-advertised clock speeds...see below)

On my friend's gigabyte 990fxa-ud3 board, I saw that the CPU was running at only 3.3Ghz under prime95. It would run cinebench at 3.6, but when the load got really heavy in prime95, it would "throttle" down to only 3.3 and stay there.

I ended up having to update the BIOS on the motherboard so that I had the option to disable the feature that causes this. I think it's called "Advanced Power Management" or something like that. (It's just below cool n quiet in the BIOS on that board)

Once I disabled the APM feature, the thing would go to 3.6 under full load and stay there. Now onto the OC....

3) If your temps are over 50C with prime 95 small fft's (in stock trim) you will need better cooling for overclocking. If you have a big enough case, the Cooler Master hyper 212+ is < $30 and works very well. If that won't fit in your case, or if you don't want to remove your MB to install the support plate, the 212 comes with and needs, try the cooler master hyper TX3. (There are many other great coolers that can be had without spending a bunch of money)

Now onto the overclock...

4) Go into your BIOS, turn off turbo core, and raise the CPU multiplier to the speed you want. (22.5 should net you a 4.5 CPU frequency)

Then save and exit and run prime 95 blend test for a couple hours and keep an eye on your temps. I have heard that the FX chips can handle more heat than the older phenom's but I have only found one place that lists the max safe temp at 70C. Until we get some more brave souls to run their CPU's that hot and survive, I just set my target at < 60C under full load. (This is my "subjective" mark based on the temps from the stock setup under load. It probably would have gone higher had I let it run longer.)

5) "Tweak" If your computer doesn't lock-up, crash, or get too hot, under a couple hours of stress testing, you can go back and raise the multiplier and test some more.

If your temps are good, but your computer crashes, try adding a little vcore voltage.

If your computer is stable but gets too hot, try lowering your Vcore voltage.

My sample runs at ~57C with stock voltage at 4.4Ghz. 4.5 BSOD's at stock voltage and even a small vcore bump. The voltage it needs to stabilize at 4.5 pushes the temps too high for my comfort, so 4.4 it is.

Things I do differently than most "how-to's":

I keep Cool N Quiet and C1 enabled so that my processor(s) are not going flat-out while I surf the web or type an email.

I also play with the turbo core multiplier once I get everything else stable. I have found that all-core stable is usually a little slower than single-core stable. My 1045t runs at 3.4 Ghz with a turbo (single core) speed of 3.8Ghz) I'm running the 4100FX at 4.4Ghz with a turbo speed of 4.6Ghz.

You may be able to go a little faster if you disable all the features that cause your voltage and clock speed to change with load, but I prefer to keep the power saving features when possible.







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