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Cooling post-shutdown- do fans exist or have you ever considered this?

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a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 9:16:25 AM

Happy weekend all- I'm working on a concept I just had pop into my head. Basically I see the digital readout on my case shows the ambient interior temperature of the case stays nearly the same (78-82 degrees Fahrenheit) for up to two hours after shutdown, depending how intensely the system had been working and on whether or not I have room fans circulating air. To contrast, my computer's first boot of the day is always at a nice interior case temp of 70-74 degrees, as it's had all night to cool down to match the external temp reading. So really, I'm already hampered if I go flip the system back on and try to stay cool during a video editing session or such after a short break.

What I want is to take one of the computer's 120mm fan brackets and install something to pull air into the case after I've powered down the system. I know this could be done with a USB powered fan with the power cord running out and to an AC outlet to USB plug converter, but that seems rather inconvenient and gaudy.

If anything, I may try to build a small power control switch enclosure to sit next to my case. Essentially incorporate an AC to ?v adapter (12v, 5v, guess the fan would determine) to the switch, and a cable from the switch feeding to a plug I'd install in a PCI slot cover, as to make it easy to disconnect or relocate. Inside I'd have the fan cable cut to the right length and soldered to the plug.

The whole thing would be wonderful, as I would bet it wouldn't take more than 10 minutes to cool everything when not running (I may even incorporate a timer into the switch system). However, I would MUCH MUCH prefer to find that this is a common thought and that a commercial option is out there. I've looked, but who knows if I am using the right search words.

Thoughts guys?
a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 9:40:48 AM

I would say any system that NEEDS cooling once the system is shut off isnt properly built or operating. Your temps are nothing to worry about so im not sure I see the use of a system like this for you.
a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 1:24:41 PM

Interesting thought. I don't think the internal temperature of 26°C after shut down is anything to worry about though. The components are far more stressed temperature wise during actual use. It may even be beneficial that the components cool down slowly. But that's just a guess.

I think the benefit of what your thinking of doing is minimal, but still I think its an interesting thought none the less.
a b K Overclocking
July 22, 2012 7:17:20 PM

skaz said:
Interesting thought. I don't think the internal temperature of 26°C after shut down is anything to worry about though. The components are far more stressed temperature wise during actual use. It may even be beneficial that the components cool down slowly. But that's just a guess.

I think the benefit of what your thinking of doing is minimal, but still I think its an interesting thought none the less.


See, Im not so focused on the case temp at rest- rather it's the fact that core temps seem to have a linear relation to the air temp around them. It takes a good hour or two for the system to slowly retain heat and go from room temp to the 3-5c higher reading. As that takes place, the floor number for even idle readings creeps up at a near 1:1 ratio. So really, this could mean a cpu and gpu running 3-5c cooler under load for hours per day.

In the real world I know that there won't be any observed benefit, but I have an engineer-like obsession with tinkering. It is either this project or keep working on the AMD socket 939 mobo system I have in progress using parts from dead yardsale units. :kaola: 
!