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Upgradeable luggable or laptop for everyman?

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July 18, 2004 5:15:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I realize that there are luggable computers of various ilks, but all of
them I've seen are outrageous in cost. I'm thinking of something that
would be no more expensive than a laptop/notebook, which of course is
going to be more expensive than a desktop of similar power. I'm
wondering whether anything exists that could be taken to class and used
on your typical school desk, but which won't be a dispos-o-PC in two
years (or less)? I can imagine why laptop and notebook manufacturers
aren't much interested in upgradeability (they'd rather sell us all
replacement laptops and notebooks every two years or less), but doesn't
SOMEBODY make a reasonably priced luggable case that would fit the
bill? I've found one source of luggable case
(http://www.lunchboxcomputers.com/), but the cases themselves are as
expensive as a laptop, and they would hardly be usable in even a
slightly confined space.

Please -- I have specific reasons for asking these particular
questions. Your opinions about how you would do it if you were me are
appreciated, but are not helpful. (Responses in other newsgroups have
led me to note that some people would rather preach a sermon than spill
a URL.)

TIA
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 18, 2004 10:56:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 13:15:24 -0400, Sporkman
<sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote:
> I can imagine why laptop and notebook manufacturers
>aren't much interested in upgradeability (they'd rather sell us all
>replacement laptops and notebooks every two years or less), but doesn't
>SOMEBODY make a reasonably priced luggable case that would fit the
>bill?

As far as I know, nobody does this affordably. There doesn't seem
to be a large market for it anywhere.
Emanuel
July 18, 2004 10:56:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

E Brown wrote:
> As far as I know, nobody does this affordably. There doesn't seem
> to be a large market for it anywhere.
> Emanuel

That's an interesting comment, Emanuel. Really! I wouldn't disagree
with you but I'd like to ask you your opinion of WHY there isn't a large
market (if their isn't). Certainly there are more and more young people
who aren't afraid to replace a CPU or a motherboard, and who will build
their own systems if it happens to make economic sense to do so.
Certainly also there are a lot of workers who need to take their work
home but who don't need to work while on an airplane, in a car or on a
bus. Seems to me that their management and their IT people should be
happy to have a luggable case that they can basically put a desktop
system in and be able to upgrade from time to time. Save them the cost
of a new laptop evey couple of years, allow the employees to work on
powerful systems without having to burn CDs and/or use FTP or logon to
office systems from home, keep the companies from having to spend a lot
of money up front . . .

D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)? Or
is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing compact
enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense? All of
the above?

TIA
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 18, 2004 10:56:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sporkman wrote:
>
> E Brown wrote:
> > As far as I know, nobody does this affordably. There doesn't seem
> > to be a large market for it anywhere.
> > Emanuel
>
> That's an interesting comment, Emanuel. Really! I wouldn't disagree
> with you but I'd like to ask you your opinion of WHY there isn't a large
> market (if their isn't). Certainly there are more and more young people
> who aren't afraid to replace a CPU or a motherboard, and who will build
> their own systems if it happens to make economic sense to do so.
> Certainly also there are a lot of workers who need to take their work
> home but who don't need to work while on an airplane, in a car or on a
> bus. Seems to me that their management and their IT people should be
> happy to have a luggable case that they can basically put a desktop
> system in and be able to upgrade from time to time. Save them the cost
> of a new laptop evey couple of years, allow the employees to work on
> powerful systems without having to burn CDs and/or use FTP or logon to
> office systems from home, keep the companies from having to spend a lot
> of money up front . . .
>
> D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
> manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)? Or
> is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing compact
> enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense? All of
> the above?

I seem to remember products similar to what you're asking for, some
years back. Basically a "luggable" case that would take a standard form
factor motherboard, often with a built in monitor of some sort. I
didn't pay close attention at the time and so cannot recall further
details.

My guess would be that the number of people who need luggability, but
not the portability of a laptop, AND who are willing to build their own
system, is too small to sustain affordable products. If enough people
wanted to buy it, someone would probably make it.

Lisa
July 18, 2004 10:56:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Lisa Horton wrote:
> I seem to remember products similar to what you're asking for, some
> years back. Basically a "luggable" case that would take a standard form
> factor motherboard, often with a built in monitor of some sort. I
> didn't pay close attention at the time and so cannot recall further
> details.
>
> My guess would be that the number of people who need luggability, but
> not the portability of a laptop, AND who are willing to build their own
> system, is too small to sustain affordable products. If enough people
> wanted to buy it, someone would probably make it.
>
> Lisa

Your guess may be good, Lisa Horton, and I thank you sincerely for the
feedback.

Answer me this, though -- do you think companies like Acer, Gigabyte,
Shuttle, Abit, Asus and many others who design, manufacture and sell
motherboards are making decent money? Surely the development costs are
great, and to assemble and test a motherboard is not a trivial task.
Many of these companies don't have a prayer of selling to major players
like Dell, Compaq or HP (their costs are WAY undercut by companies like
Pionex, Biostar and others), so they probably make a very large
proportion of their profit by selling to Mom'n'Pop shops and to
individuals. If that's true, then there SEEMS to be a rather large
market niche of people and small companies who put together their own
systems. Is my logic faulty?

Somehow I suspect there's a different reason for such a thing not being
available. I could be wrong . . .

TIA
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 2:31:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The closest I can come is a keyboard PC, where the CPU is in the keyboard.
Don't know how easy it is to modify though. I think there are at least 2
manufacters. Try:

http://www.cybernetman.com/default.cfm/DocId/602.htm
July 19, 2004 2:31:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Davis wrote:
>
> The closest I can come is a keyboard PC, where the CPU is in the keyboard.
> Don't know how easy it is to modify though. I think there are at least 2
> manufacters. Try:
>
> http://www.cybernetman.com/default.cfm/DocId/602.htm

Huh! I didn't know such existed. No, it's not what I'm looking for,
but thanks for the link. It's interesting!!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 3:28:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Try a Shuttle XPC. It is more than
luggable, and even comes with a
matching shoulder bag.



dk


"Sporkman" <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote in message
news:40FAB02C.BE3F7A00@bigfootDOT.com...
> I realize that there are luggable computers of various ilks, but all of
> them I've seen are outrageous in cost. I'm thinking of something that
> would be no more expensive than a laptop/notebook, which of course is
> going to be more expensive than a desktop of similar power. I'm
> wondering whether anything exists that could be taken to class and used
> on your typical school desk, but which won't be a dispos-o-PC in two
> years (or less)? I can imagine why laptop and notebook manufacturers
> aren't much interested in upgradeability (they'd rather sell us all
> replacement laptops and notebooks every two years or less), but doesn't
> SOMEBODY make a reasonably priced luggable case that would fit the
> bill? I've found one source of luggable case
> (http://www.lunchboxcomputers.com/), but the cases themselves are as
> expensive as a laptop, and they would hardly be usable in even a
> slightly confined space.
>
> Please -- I have specific reasons for asking these particular
> questions. Your opinions about how you would do it if you were me are
> appreciated, but are not helpful. (Responses in other newsgroups have
> led me to note that some people would rather preach a sermon than spill
> a URL.)
>
> TIA
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 3:31:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"E Brown" <epbrown01@att.net> wrote in message
news:mgglf0h5mhiaa5gc50vosei9p1iog04tnh@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 13:15:24 -0400, Sporkman
> <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote:
> > I can imagine why laptop and notebook manufacturers
> >aren't much interested in upgradeability (they'd rather sell us all
> >replacement laptops and notebooks every two years or less), but doesn't
> >SOMEBODY make a reasonably priced luggable case that would fit the
> >bill?
>
> As far as I know, nobody does this affordably.


Many vendors do. They're called SFF
(small form factor) computers. E.g.
Shuttle XPC, Soltek Qbic, etc...

Check www.shuttle.com.

There are even book sized PC's, e.g.
www.littlepc.com.


> There doesn't seem to be a large
> market for it anywhere.


Non-sense. Of course there is.



dk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 3:34:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Sporkman" <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote in message
news:40FAEEE5.75EC018C@bigfootDOT.com...
>
> D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
> manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)? Or
> is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing compact
> enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense? All of
> the above?
>


Such things do indeed exist.

Check:

www.shuttle.com

www.littlepc.com

www.cybernetman.com


Enjoy,



dk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 3:43:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Lisa Horton" <Lisanews0509@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
news:40FAF4C0.94D07510@lisahorton.net...
>
> My guess would be that the number of people who need luggability, but
> not the portability of a laptop, AND who are willing to build their own
> system, is too small to sustain affordable products. If enough people
> wanted to buy it, someone would probably make it.
>



And indeed they do.

Check the Shuttle XPC:

www.shuttle.com


I have traveled with a Shuttle XPC in a
shoulder carry bag, two 16" laptops and
two 16" LCD's in a on oversize carry-on
bag, and didn't even make the TSA people
curious -- which makes me believe I was
not the first nor only person to have
walked through SFO security with more
than one computer attached to his/her
body.

BTW the Shuttle ZPC bag has the looks,
shape and size of a camera bag, and
therefore qualifies as the "personal
item" one can take on board besides
the standard 9"x14"x22" carry-on.
The Brenthaven 3950 I'm using is
actually 9"x17"x22", and have
never been turned back.


dk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 3:44:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Sporkman" <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote in message
news:40FAF8ED.3A7EF68@bigfootDOT.com...
>
> Somehow I suspect there's a different reason
> for such a thing not being available. I could
> be wrong . . .
>


You are.

They are available.



dk
July 19, 2004 6:24:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Well, my thought is that anything over 10 pounds (the weight of my Inspiron
9100 w/AC adapter) is too big to be lugging around on a regular basis. It
wasn't so bad if you park right outside the office door, but if you have to
lug it around to a parking spot a few blocks away or anything, it stops
being fun. I know this from experience. So you're better off just buying a
laptop, IMHO, if portability is required. IIRC, those old luggables were up
over 20 pounds.

For what it's worth, Acer makes a laptop with a 17" screen and desktop P4
processor, HD, and RAM. Not entirely upgradeable (i.e. AGP slots), but
close. Also, a number of manufacturers (Shuttle and others) make their SFF
machines, as you're aware. I THINK you can get cases for those, which you
could then treat as a luggable unit, but without the monitor. Probably
cheap enough to just give the employee a monitor to stick in their office at
home if that's the only place the computer will be used.

My $0.02 worth.

Clint

"Sporkman" <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote in message
news:40FAEEE5.75EC018C@bigfootDOT.com...
> E Brown wrote:
> > As far as I know, nobody does this affordably. There doesn't
seem
> > to be a large market for it anywhere.
> > Emanuel
>
> That's an interesting comment, Emanuel. Really! I wouldn't disagree
> with you but I'd like to ask you your opinion of WHY there isn't a large
> market (if their isn't). Certainly there are more and more young people
> who aren't afraid to replace a CPU or a motherboard, and who will build
> their own systems if it happens to make economic sense to do so.
> Certainly also there are a lot of workers who need to take their work
> home but who don't need to work while on an airplane, in a car or on a
> bus. Seems to me that their management and their IT people should be
> happy to have a luggable case that they can basically put a desktop
> system in and be able to upgrade from time to time. Save them the cost
> of a new laptop evey couple of years, allow the employees to work on
> powerful systems without having to burn CDs and/or use FTP or logon to
> office systems from home, keep the companies from having to spend a lot
> of money up front . . .
>
> D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
> manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)? Or
> is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing compact
> enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense? All of
> the above?
>
> TIA
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 7:25:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sporkman wrote:
>
> Lisa Horton wrote:
> > I seem to remember products similar to what you're asking for, some
> > years back. Basically a "luggable" case that would take a standard form
> > factor motherboard, often with a built in monitor of some sort. I
> > didn't pay close attention at the time and so cannot recall further
> > details.
> >
> > My guess would be that the number of people who need luggability, but
> > not the portability of a laptop, AND who are willing to build their own
> > system, is too small to sustain affordable products. If enough people
> > wanted to buy it, someone would probably make it.
> >
> > Lisa
>
> Your guess may be good, Lisa Horton, and I thank you sincerely for the
> feedback.
>
> Answer me this, though -- do you think companies like Acer, Gigabyte,
> Shuttle, Abit, Asus and many others who design, manufacture and sell
> motherboards are making decent money? Surely the development costs are
> great, and to assemble and test a motherboard is not a trivial task.
> Many of these companies don't have a prayer of selling to major players
> like Dell, Compaq or HP (their costs are WAY undercut by companies like
> Pionex, Biostar and others), so they probably make a very large
> proportion of their profit by selling to Mom'n'Pop shops and to
> individuals. If that's true, then there SEEMS to be a rather large
> market niche of people and small companies who put together their own
> systems. Is my logic faulty?

I think that the motherboard companies you mention are probably making
money, considering that they continue to be in business. I wouldn't
speculate on how much, although research might be able to answer that
question.

Where I think your logic may not be correct is in confusing the group of
people who will/do build their systems, with the subset of that group,
those who will/want to build their own luggable system.

Also, I don't see this as necessarily a motherboard issue. Surely the
tiny mini-ATX type mobos could be shoehorned into a luggable form
factor. I'm thinking sewing machine size, with an LCD monitor on one
side. It would seem to me that all that's missing is the luggable
case. And if such a product was once sold but is not now, then there is
a reason the manufacturers stopped making them. Reasons could include
but not be limited to low sales, expensive to make, certain components
becoming too expensive or unavailable.

>
> Somehow I suspect there's a different reason for such a thing not being
> available. I could be wrong . . .

My casual analysis points me in the direction of low demand.

I'm actually in what might be the target group. I want a machine that's
close to as fast as a desktop, and I don't mind (too much) carrying the
weight needed to deliver that. What would a luggable offer me over my
current big heavy laptop? A bigger screen? At 15.5 inches widescreen,
the display couldn't get much, if any bigger in the luggable form
factor. Access to bigger & faster internal drives? True, but I like
the modular approach I'm using of multiple external drives on USB2.0 and
Firewire. I don't have to carry the big drives ALL the time. PCI
Expansion slots? Yes, but what little I need that a modern full
featured laptop doesn't include can pretty much all be accommodated by
PC cards. I could go on, but in short, I don't see the luggable as
offering any compelling advantages over a large laptop, yet the luggable
would still be larger and likely heavier.

But I could be wrong too :) 

Lisa
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 8:12:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sporkman wrote:
>> Lisa Horton wrote:
>>> I seem to remember products similar to what you're asking for, some
>>> years back. Basically a "luggable" case that would take a standard
>>> form factor motherboard, often with a built in monitor of some
>>> sort. I didn't pay close attention at the time and so cannot
>>> recall further details.
>>>
>>> My guess would be that the number of people who need luggability,
>>> but not the portability of a laptop, AND who are willing to build
>>> their own system, is too small to sustain affordable products. If
>>> enough people wanted to buy it, someone would probably make it.
>>>
>>> Lisa
>>
>> Your guess may be good, Lisa Horton, and I thank you sincerely for
>> the feedback.
>>
>> Answer me this, though -- do you think companies like Acer, Gigabyte,
>> Shuttle, Abit, Asus and many others who design, manufacture and sell
>> motherboards are making decent money? Surely the development costs
>> are great, and to assemble and test a motherboard is not a trivial
>> task. Many of these companies don't have a prayer of selling to
>> major players like Dell, Compaq or HP (their costs are WAY undercut
>> by companies like Pionex, Biostar and others), so they probably make
>> a very large proportion of their profit by selling to Mom'n'Pop
>> shops and to individuals. If that's true, then there SEEMS to be a
>> rather large market niche of people and small companies who put
>> together their own systems. Is my logic faulty?
>>
>> Somehow I suspect there's a different reason for such a thing not
>> being available. I could be wrong . . .
>>
>> TIA

Well, for the big ones (Dell n the gang) they want em cheap, and with the
amount of profits they rake in, they want CHEAP...not so much as
reliability...because they can afford to replace a few mobos here and
there..

While for Asus Abit Gigabyte and the gang, they build em to be reliable and
have good/high performance... and the "individuals" would be ready to cough
up a bit extra for these 2 factors. Moreover, the brand name (reliability)
must be good, in order to compete... so that adds strain to the bottom line.

There are still divided groups of PC users/buyers: first timer noobies (who
look for price) and second-or more-timers, who look for quality parts/high
performance stuff instead. Companies have to strike a balance between the
two, so it's a tough thing. For those who like to put together their own
laptops, the high cost of components (of x1 vs x10000 or more) of CPUs etc,
would make it cheaper (in most cases) to buy a ready made unit...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 8:19:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sporkman <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote:
>
> D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
> manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)?
> Or is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing
> compact enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense?
> All of the above?

All of the above. Besides, where's the sense in lugging a "portable" desktop
around when it's so much easier (and cheaper) to simply carry the
information around with you on some type of removable media?

--
Regards,

James

Checkout the NEW Thinkpad Forums: http://forum.thinkpads.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 19, 2004 8:19:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"JHEM" <James@ESAD_SPAMMERS.thinkpads.com> wrote in message
news:XvSKc.8110$Iz3.676@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
> Sporkman <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote:
> >
> > D'ya think the reason such a thing doesn't exist is because laptop
> > manufacturers just want to sell entire laptops (much bigger profit)?
> > Or is it because of technical limitations in making such a thing
> > compact enough? Or just because it just doesn't make economic sense?
> > All of the above?
>
> All of the above. Besides, where's the sense in lugging a "portable"
desktop
> around when it's so much easier (and cheaper) to simply carry the
> information around with you on some type of removable media?
>


Well, there may be situations when one
needs the actual computer, rather than
just the information on it.

As an example, consider an active stock
trader who runs a number of high power
software packages at the same time and
uses 2 or more displays. The software
is locked to the computer. Such a
person would be tied to his/her
desk unless they used a Shuttle
XPC (or similar box) for their
work.



dk
July 19, 2004 10:46:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Good comments and (apparently) clear thinking, Lisa. Thanks.

Lisa Horton wrote:
> I think that the motherboard companies you mention are probably making
> money, considering that they continue to be in business. I wouldn't
> speculate on how much, although research might be able to answer that
> question.
>
> Where I think your logic may not be correct is in confusing the group of
> people who will/do build their systems, with the subset of that group,
> those who will/want to build their own luggable system.
>
> Also, I don't see this as necessarily a motherboard issue. Surely the
> tiny mini-ATX type mobos could be shoehorned into a luggable form
> factor. I'm thinking sewing machine size, with an LCD monitor on one
> side. It would seem to me that all that's missing is the luggable
> case. And if such a product was once sold but is not now, then there is
> a reason the manufacturers stopped making them. Reasons could include
> but not be limited to low sales, expensive to make, certain components
> becoming too expensive or unavailable.
>
> My casual analysis points me in the direction of low demand.
>
> I'm actually in what might be the target group. I want a machine that's
> close to as fast as a desktop, and I don't mind (too much) carrying the
> weight needed to deliver that. What would a luggable offer me over my
> current big heavy laptop? A bigger screen? At 15.5 inches widescreen,
> the display couldn't get much, if any bigger in the luggable form
> factor. Access to bigger & faster internal drives? True, but I like
> the modular approach I'm using of multiple external drives on USB2.0 and
> Firewire. I don't have to carry the big drives ALL the time. PCI
> Expansion slots? Yes, but what little I need that a modern full
> featured laptop doesn't include can pretty much all be accommodated by
> PC cards. I could go on, but in short, I don't see the luggable as
> offering any compelling advantages over a large laptop, yet the luggable
> would still be larger and likely heavier.
>
> But I could be wrong too :) 
>
> Lisa
July 20, 2004 2:55:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks. Good insights.
Also thanks to James and others who posted.

Clint wrote:
>
> Well, my thought is that anything over 10 pounds (the weight of my Inspiron
> 9100 w/AC adapter) is too big to be lugging around on a regular basis. It
> wasn't so bad if you park right outside the office door, but if you have to
> lug it around to a parking spot a few blocks away or anything, it stops
> being fun. I know this from experience. So you're better off just buying a
> laptop, IMHO, if portability is required. IIRC, those old luggables were up
> over 20 pounds.
>
> For what it's worth, Acer makes a laptop with a 17" screen and desktop P4
> processor, HD, and RAM. Not entirely upgradeable (i.e. AGP slots), but
> close. Also, a number of manufacturers (Shuttle and others) make their SFF
> machines, as you're aware. I THINK you can get cases for those, which you
> could then treat as a luggable unit, but without the monitor. Probably
> cheap enough to just give the employee a monitor to stick in their office at
> home if that's the only place the computer will be used.
>
> My $0.02 worth.
>
> Clint
July 21, 2004 4:30:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Dan Koren wrote:
>
> Well, there may be situations when one needs the actual computer, rather than
> just the information on it.
>
> As an example, consider an active stock trader who runs a number of high power
> software packages at the same time and uses 2 or more displays. The software
> is locked to the computer. Such a person would be tied to his/her
> desk unless they used a Shuttle XPC (or similar box) for their work.
>
> dk

BUT, I guess I have to agree with others that the market is possibly
just very limited. What you're describing is a pretty small niche.
There are people (like me) -- maybe even quite a few people -- who would
want such a thing as I describe, but perhaps it hasn't been done because
it's a limited niche market and wouldn't be profitable enough. Oh
well. Any other leads will be appreciate.

'Sporky'
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 21, 2004 4:32:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi Sporkman,

I know this thread has been talked to death, but I would like to throw in my .02¢. I spend very little time in my office. So
portability is a must. The question then became did I want to use my Dolch lunchbox or a laptop. The Dolch lasted me about a
year and a half and then it began to feel cramped. True, I could upgrade some of it, I looked at the money and hassle and opted
for a laptop instead. I gave my technical writer the Dolch, and she is still using it. Me I find that because of the type of
work I do, that I need to upgrade every year or so. Software just keeps becoming more and more resource hungry every year.

Would I go back to a lunchbox if the price was right? In a minute. That Dolch was one of the most reliable portable machines
that I ever owned. The lack of battery was never really an issue, and the weight was worth it to have a quality machine to work on.

Will the price of lunchboxes ever become reasonable. I doubt it. When you talk about miniaturization, it cost. When you talk
about miniaturization that must maintain compatibility with desktops, it is even more expensive.

I lug around a HP Pavilion zd7010us, laptop with a 17" screen and separate numeric keypad. It weighs in at about 9.5lbs. Include
my gadgets, and my computer bag weighs in at about 25lbs. No fun when running across airports, but performance is a must for
what I use my laptop for.


Ciao . . . C.Joseph

That which a man buys too cheaply . . .
He esteems too lightly


Sporkman wrote:
> I realize that there are luggable computers of various ilks, but all of
> them I've seen are outrageous in cost. I'm thinking of something that
> would be no more expensive than a laptop/notebook, which of course is
> going to be more expensive than a desktop of similar power. I'm
> wondering whether anything exists that could be taken to class and used
> on your typical school desk, but which won't be a dispos-o-PC in two
> years (or less)? I can imagine why laptop and notebook manufacturers
> aren't much interested in upgradeability (they'd rather sell us all
> replacement laptops and notebooks every two years or less), but doesn't
> SOMEBODY make a reasonably priced luggable case that would fit the
> bill? I've found one source of luggable case
> (http://www.lunchboxcomputers.com/), but the cases themselves are as
> expensive as a laptop, and they would hardly be usable in even a
> slightly confined space.
>
> Please -- I have specific reasons for asking these particular
> questions. Your opinions about how you would do it if you were me are
> appreciated, but are not helpful. (Responses in other newsgroups have
> led me to note that some people would rather preach a sermon than spill
> a URL.)
>
> TIA
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
July 21, 2004 7:00:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Sporkman" <sporkedUNDERLINEagainMUNGE@bigfootDOT.com> wrote in message
news:40FE9A20.18159C23@bigfootDOT.com...
> Dan Koren wrote:
> >
> > Well, there may be situations when one needs the actual computer, rather
than
> > just the information on it.
> >
> > As an example, consider an active stock trader who runs a number of high
power
> > software packages at the same time and uses 2 or more displays. The
software
> > is locked to the computer. Such a person would be tied to his/her
> > desk unless they used a Shuttle XPC (or similar box) for their work.
>
> BUT, I guess I have to agree with others that the market is possibly
> just very limited. What you're describing is a pretty small niche.


Not quite as small as one might think.


> There are people (like me) -- maybe even quite a few people -- who would
> want such a thing as I describe, but perhaps it hasn't been done because
> it's a limited niche market and wouldn't be profitable enough. Oh
> well. Any other leads will be appreciate.


We seem to be going in circles here.

Have you taken the time to read my
earlier posts in this thread, and
check the web sites I recommended?

The Shuttle XPC is perfectly portable,
and upgradable in every respect. Why
and how does it not meet the needs
outlined in your original question?

Again, check www.shuttle.com.

Shuttle is selling 10's of thousands,
so the market is not quite as small
as one might think.

And there are other brands/models
that are similar in shape, size
and capabilities.

I do take one of my Shuttle boxes
to class from time to time. I find
that more practical than taking a
large laptop, since desk space is
at a premium, and the Shuttle can
be stoved under the desk or under
my chair.



dk
July 21, 2004 7:27:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

See at bottom...

Dan Koren wrote:
> Not quite as small as one might think.
>
> We seem to be going in circles here.
>
> Have you taken the time to read my earlier posts in this thread, and
> check the web sites I recommended?
>
> The Shuttle XPC is perfectly portable, and upgradable in every respect. Why
> and how does it not meet the needs outlined in your original question?
>
> Again, check www.shuttle.com.
>
> Shuttle is selling 10's of thousands, so the market is not quite as small
> as one might think.
>
> And there are other brands/models that are similar in shape, size
> and capabilities.
>
> I do take one of my Shuttle boxes to class from time to time. I find
> that more practical than taking a large laptop, since desk space is
> at a premium, and the Shuttle can be stoved under the desk or under
> my chair.
>
> dk

Yes (thanks), I had taken a look at the Shuttle XPC but had not thought
of it in any terms differently than quite a few (quite expensive) others
on the market. Perhaps I was mistaken in that. But I didn't see any
such post by you -- only a reference to Shuttle by someone named
"Clint". The first post by you I saw was the one mentioning the "active
stock trader who runs a number of high power software packages". If
another earlier post exists my ISP's news server doesn't show it.

Have any idea what these Shuttle DXPs cost as a ballpark? And when you
take yours to class what do you do for a monitor?

Reading over Shuttle's material I DID happen onto mention of SFFTech
(www.SFFTech.com), which is a small form-factor enthusiast's site.
That's very good to know about. I'm looking over it now.

'Sporky'
!