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Need help understanding overclocking.

Last response: in Overclocking
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July 23, 2012 12:58:24 AM

So...with a cpu, once it has the 'k' value it can be overclocked.

A GPU can be overclocked, it doesnt have a "letter."

A motherboard lets a cpu be overclocked considerably.....depending on its capability. Mother boards have different letters.....H, Z, P, Q, X...etc.

So on newegg.com, i saw different letters for the 7 series motherboard for ASRock, B75, H77, Z75/77

1. Which letters on the mobo are non overclocking and which are overclocking?

2. So....Lets say you couple a 'k' cpu with a non clocking Mobo, can it still be overclocked?!

3. If you couple a GPU that can be overclocked with a non clocking MOBO can it be overclocked?



Best solution

a b K Overclocking
a c 78 à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
July 23, 2012 1:25:27 AM

1. Generally speaking, motherboards are "overclocking" boards if /when they allow the user to adjust parameters like reference clock speed, various voltages, ram timings, etc.

2. Yes. The "K" indicates an unlocked CPU multiplier. Even cheap boards that don't allow much,if any, control over the variables listed above allow the CPU multiplier to be adjusted. With "locked" CPU's that variable can only be adjusted down, but with unlocked CPU's such as a 2600K, it can be adjusted both up and down.

3. The only overclocking I have done on GPU's is with software. (MSI Afterburner) It makes no mention of MB requirements on the website and has worked well with the two GPU's/MB's I have played with.

*Note* Overclocking generally draws more power from your components and can easily overheat/overload "cheap" motherboards and power supplies . If you are going to overclock, you should try to anticipate the increased stress and use components that can handle it.

For instance, don't get a 350 watt power supply for a system that requires 350 watts before any overclocking. You might let the magic smoke out of some components. Some of the cheaper motherboards maybe designed only to handle the power draw from "stock" CPU loads. I once "unlocked" the 4th core on a an Athlon 455 and quickly relocked it once I saw that my chip that was rated at 95w with three cores was pulling considerably more than that with the extra core....and my cheap ECS board was only rated for the 95w to begin with.
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July 23, 2012 1:29:31 AM

Best answer selected by Adrian_JH.
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July 23, 2012 9:05:16 AM

Quote:
Yes. The "K" indicates an unlocked CPU multiplier. Even cheap boards that don't allow much,if any, control over the variables listed above allow the CPU multiplier to be adjusted. With "locked" CPU's that variable can only be adjusted down, but with unlocked CPU's such as a 2600K, it can be adjusted both up and down.


Not exactly, not all motherboards are going to allow you to increase the multiplier as much as you want just cause you have a K series cpu, it depends on the chipset. z77 is the best fully featured chipset, it allows overclocking. Something like a h61 on the other hand is missing some of the perks and won't let you clock high, I believe the max you get on non-overclocking chipsets is either around the turbo boost limit or 1-200mhz above but you wouldn't be going over 4ghz on a low end board
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