Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

PSU recommendations

Last response: in Components
Share
March 9, 2010 10:34:36 AM

Hi, I'm building an i5-750 PC but am not sure how powerful a PSU I will need to run it (I was guessing a 650W).

Quick specs for the build are:
- i5-750 + noctua nh-d14
- ASUS p7p55d-E pro motherboard
- 4 GB RAM
- Spinpoint F3 1TB HD
- 1 DVD R/W
- Radeon Vapor-x 5770
- Lian Li PC-B25F case
- some sort of Freeview tuner

I'm mainly going to use the PC for:
- normal home use (internet/mail/music/movies etc)
- work (running virtualised machines with various operating systems; experimenting with RAID ; other home IT projects)
- gaming (I'm currently a console gamer [PS3] but want to check out PC gaming too)

Ideally, I'd like to buy something quiet, cool running, and efficient (80%, bronze rated??) that can comfortably accomodate the above components (including overclocking). But I also want to ensure I have future upgrades covered too. I can see myself adding a few more hard drives, possibly running another Radeon 5770 (x-fire), and switching to an i7 some way down the line.

I was considering an Antec 650W Truepower or Signature, I hear Seasonic are good too (but pricy). Are any of these a good choice - can you recommend something better (I'm prepared to spend around £100)??

Thanks!!!

More about : psu recommendations

March 9, 2010 12:44:50 PM

Enermax PRO87+ or MODU87+. Even the 600W model should be enough for your use, seeing as it's a 80 PLUS GOLD (87% efficiency or higher) product.

The Antec is fine, though. You might want to consider Corsair HX____ products.
Related resources
March 9, 2010 3:03:48 PM

Hi all, thanks for the feedback. I'll look into the PSU's you've recommended. Also, is it better to go one with many separate power lines (i.e. many 12V lines)?
March 9, 2010 3:05:00 PM

(I meant Multiple +12 V Rails)
a b ) Power supply
March 9, 2010 3:25:27 PM

there is no real difference, a good psu is a good psu irrespective of how many 12v rails it has
March 9, 2010 5:26:52 PM

Corsair, seasonic psu are very very good... for exacly that system a Corsair CX400W should do the trick... if your thinking in adding a few more drives the Corsair 450VX should be enough...
If your thinking in buying one more graphics card... and upgrading the CPU in a medium to distant future... what you should start thinking is if its gona be worth the upgrade, or should you just buy a whole computer and keep that one as it is... its a very nice comp, but u'd be stuck with extra parts you probably wont get rid of easly... and another 5770 even if they are at lower prices isnt gona do you much good...
conclusion: get an less powerfull but efficient psu for what you have and if that upgrade you mention is still a long way away, think really hard if its really necessary to buy a slightly more powerfull psu now... (go Corsair or Seasonic, modular designs are said to be a little less efficient, something to do with the open modular connections... but personally a modular PSU saves me a lot of trouble... maibe it will save you some to ;) 
a c 248 ) Power supply
March 9, 2010 5:33:20 PM

The general rule of thumb is a high quality 500 to 550 watt power supply with sufficient current (amps) on the +12 volt rail(s) can easily power a system with any single video card made. A high quality 700 to 750 watt power supply with sufficient current (amps) on the +12 volt rail(s) can power a system with two video cards operating in dual mode. There are a few exceptions like the new ATI Radeon HD 5000 series cards which use less power due to their energy efficiency.

A high quality 500 to 550 watt psu will have a +12 volt rail rated at 40 amps. A high quality 700 to 750 watt psu will have a +12 volt rail rated at 60 amps.

In addition the power supply should be at least 80+ Bronze certified for energy efficiency. There are some models available which have achieved 80+ Silver and 80+ Gold Certifications.

Before purchasing a new psu you will need to decide whether you will eventually have a pc with one or two video cards.

Corsair and Seasonic are two of the brands that have a reputation for high quality power supplies that consistently earn high marks in technical reviews. They are reliable, stable, and come with a 5 year warranty. Some of the newer models come with a 7 year warranty. Lately we've been seeing a few other brands offering some high quality units.
March 10, 2010 11:36:45 AM

So, the according to the feedback, it sounds like it's probably not worth future proofing (i.e. buying a 650W PSU) but rather I should buy a PSU for components I will definitely have in the short term (i.e. now or within 6 months).

On the subject of future upgrades, I will definitely add more hard/optical drives. The problem with predicting the need for another 5770 is that I'm not (currently) a PC gamer, and the decision to buy a second 5770 will really only be driven by my wanting to get into PC gaming in a big way (I do consider myself a serious console gamer). Regarding the i7 - this will come only if/when I run out of grunt with my i5 - i don't expect this to happen in the next 1 / 1.5 years (sorry for the confusion regarding this).

Are there any big problems with owning a larger power supply than required (other than a higher energy bill) if all I want to do is future proof my system (I could by a smaller one now and upgrade later, but then there's the hassle factor - and cost - of buying a new PSU and selling an older one .... i have no idea whether there is much demand for 2nd hand power supplies either).

Thanks!
March 11, 2010 2:20:46 PM

Hi,

Are there any big problems with owning a larger power supply than required (other than a higher energy bill) if all I want to do is future proof my system (I could by a smaller one now and upgrade later, but then there's the hassle factor - and cost - of buying a new PSU and selling an older one .... i have no idea whether there is much demand for 2nd hand power supplies either).

Thanks.
a b ) Power supply
March 11, 2010 2:56:19 PM

if your power supply is big or small as long as it has enough power for the components it wont matter the size you can have a 500 watt ppower supply and your pc might only need 300 watts at peak or you can get a 1500 watt power supply and your pc will only still need 300 watts at peak the 1500 watt might give you better upgrading headroom but it will give what a pc needs just as well as a smaller power supply but here is a good guide

one graphics card 500 watt

for 2 graphics cards a good 750 is reccomended but the newer ati cards use only a lil bit of power so a 650 watt will power 2 5xxx series cards up till the 5850 maybe the 5870 but i wouldn feel comfy so id rather have a 750 watt powering 2 5870's

if you want a single dual gpu card like the gtx295/4870x2 or 5970 a 650 watt is reccomended

or quad cards like 2x5970 or 2 x gtx 295 850 watts is considered minimum but 1000 watts is reccomended
!