Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Help with ram for AM3

Last response: in Memory
Share
July 26, 2010 5:36:21 PM

I was looking around and found these http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
im very happy with the price, heat spread, and the timings, but it says its a low voltage memory for intel. i have heard that ram designed for intel basically means it wont preform as well with amd

is this true? any recommend ram for AM3 borad?

thank you for your time

More about : ram am3

July 26, 2010 7:36:37 PM

the thing is that the first two say compatible with intel but will performance decrease with AMDs?
also i need something without a big heatsink
Related resources
a b } Memory
July 26, 2010 7:59:12 PM

Well if your're weary about the first two suggestions buy the third.
And Ripjaws are not really that tall compared to others.
I don't think ddr3 dual channel ram works any differently in an Intel or AMD system.
Funny thing cuz the third linked ram works in both platforms.
http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=223
All the compatability charts are for is reference only.
There are way too many ram modules on the market for companies Ram and Mobo
makers to test everything that's out there.
July 26, 2010 8:05:45 PM

OK, so then how about a crucial brand?

Best solution

July 26, 2010 8:48:06 PM
Share

belltollsforthee said:
the thing is that the first two say compatible with intel but will performance decrease with AMDs?
also i need something without a big heatsink

Hello,
Memory is memory, there is no Intel vs. AMD difference.
RAM that claims to be 'for Intel' may have timing profiles (stored in SPD) that can be read by Intel chipset based motherboards, like X55 and X58.
These timings can also be read by CPU-Z! If you're into tuning, you can always manually set the special tighter timings yourself.
Likewise, there were once RAM chips with 'Extended Performance Profiles' that nVidia chipsets were supposed to quickly latch on to...
And probably there are AMD chipset RAM sticks too.
But with DDR3 RAM, nobody really needs anything above 1333 MHz.
Triple-channel (X58) guys require only 1066 MHz!
If you buy 1600 MHz RAM, it will offer much tighter (quicker) timings at these reduced speeds, which is excellent.
Also, with it set it to 1333 MHz you can OC, which will increase the memory speed (unless you have a Black Edition CPU).
But a special SPD that only one type of chipset can read, that forces 1600 MHz operation with special timings and 1.65V, is not so useful.
Don't buy RAM that claims to be 'for' anything in particular.
Just buy RAM. I've had good luck with Corsair, Patriot, Mushkin, Adata, G.Skill...
Bad luck with OCZ (but I love their power supplies).
Again, high memory speed is over rated. Tight timings @ 1.5V and you're good.
Regards
a b } Memory
July 26, 2010 9:02:56 PM

belltollsforthee said:
OK, so then how about a crucial brand?

Crucial makes fine ram. A little gimicky with the lights and all though on some kits.
I own G.skills and they are great for the price/performance value.
I agree with The_OGS 100% stay away from OZC ram right now it seems they are having problems.
a b } Memory
July 26, 2010 9:10:45 PM

As the others have said there is no difference in the modules that make them Intel optimized -- that is merely a marketing gimmick to take advantage of those that do not know any better ( The reason it started showing up is that when DDR3 modules were first being released there were problems with some Intel MOBOs that would burn out the RAM sockets if using over 1.65 Volts so those modules that ran under 1.65 suddenly became "optimized for Intel" (since they wouldn't burn out the socket - while the AMD based MOBOs had no problems with up 1.9 or 2.0V !)
July 26, 2010 9:37:24 PM

Best answer selected by BellTollsForThee.
July 27, 2010 3:15:59 PM

JDFan said:
As the others have said there is no difference in the modules that make them Intel optimized -- that is merely a marketing gimmick to take advantage of those that do not know any better ( The reason it started showing up is that when DDR3 modules were first being released there were problems with some Intel MOBOs that would burn out the RAM sockets if using over 1.65 Volts so those modules that ran under 1.65 suddenly became "optimized for Intel" (since they wouldn't burn out the socket - while the AMD based MOBOs had no problems with up 1.9 or 2.0V !)

Note that DDR3 runs @ 1.5V.
1.65V is a serious overvolt, and typically not required.
Nobody runs DDR3 @ 1.9 or 2.0V...
More than 1.65V doesn't 'burn out the RAM socket' so much as it roasts the memchip.
All DDR3 memchips are supposed to run under 1.65V (so should be good with Intel).
L8R
a b } Memory
July 27, 2010 3:40:19 PM

The_OGS said:
Note that DDR3 runs @ 1.5V.
1.65V is a serious overvolt, and typically not required.
Nobody runs DDR3 @ 1.9 or 2.0V...
More than 1.65V doesn't 'burn out the RAM socket' so much as it roasts the memchip.
All DDR3 memchips are supposed to run under 1.65V (so should be good with Intel).
L8R


While the DDR3 spec is for 1.5V it depends on the modules and when you bought them awhile back most 1600Mhz and above modules were rated at 1.65V and above for Example Patriot still sells some 1.9V rated modules and there are many others that run 1.7V - 1.9V so many people do run thier DDR3 modules at 1.7 - 1.9V and those modules that were designed at that voltage do not roast the memory chips at that voltage !! (though they can and have burned out some Intel MOBO RAM sockets - while this is less of a problem nowadays since most makers have finally reduced the required Voltages to run at the higher speeds the "Intel Optimized" marketing was a result of that happening when the Modules required higher Voltages to run at those Higher Speeds and that is what I was referencing !!
July 27, 2010 5:47:42 PM

Woah! this is great stuff, wish they had this in school :) 
July 29, 2010 2:15:38 PM

JDFan said:
While the DDR3 spec is for 1.5V it depends on the modules and when you bought them awhile back most 1600Mhz and above modules were rated at 1.65V and above for Example Patriot still sells some 1.9V rated modules and there are many others that run 1.7V - 1.9V so many people do run thier DDR3 modules at 1.7 - 1.9V and those modules that were designed at that voltage do not roast the memory chips at that voltage !! (though they can and have burned out some Intel MOBO RAM sockets - while this is less of a problem nowadays since most makers have finally reduced the required Voltages to run at the higher speeds the "Intel Optimized" marketing was a result of that happening when the Modules required higher Voltages to run at those Higher Speeds and that is what I was referencing !!

Yes! I see what you mean...
It's true - I can smell the motherboards cooking!
Folks, that older 1.9V DDR3 is just Evil.
Tommy's has tested new memory that will do those specs @ 1.5V, forget even 1.65V.
I don't think anyone should support DDR3 that requires more than DDR2 voltage!
Not my definition of progress, heheh...
It's true, most DDR3 mobos cannot supply 1.9V to RAM.
Only certain specialty/highend rigs - but again, it's the answer to a question no one has asked.
You don't need insane voltages in search of extreme memory speeds, because these speeds are not required by any current CPU.
One should not go so far beyond spec in this particular direction, for something that provides little real-world benefit!
My memory runs only 1066 MHz @ 1.5V and provides 25.5 GB/s for my i7-920 (more than generous).
L8R
July 29, 2010 6:16:35 PM


Quote:
My memory runs only 1066 MHz @ 1.5V and provides 25.5 GB/s for my i7-920 (more than generous).


?
Ok, so when overclocking what am i aiming for, clock speeds? memory speeds? should i keep it in the same stock voltage? my stock voltage would be 1.3v
!