Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Hello old +3200 pc randomly reboots.

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
Share
January 2, 2010 6:04:50 PM

hello my little brother just got one of my old computers, Its an AMD +3200 Processor with 1 stick of 1GB RAM DDR1 333MHZ, 2 Harddrives 320GB and 500GB both 7200 RPM. An AGP ATI 2600 with 256mb. and ofc a DVD drev. (Windows XP SP3 32bit)

I allready tested with both HDDs and it still reboots. when it reboots its allways before it boots up on windows. or sometimes it comes all the way when you shall type in the Password to log on windows then it reboots. I dont know what it can be?

Please help :ange: 

More about : 3200 randomly reboots

January 2, 2010 11:05:02 PM

Bump? no one any ideas?
January 2, 2010 11:29:28 PM

it ias a pretty old system. I would check if capacitors are not leaking or have a rounded top instead of a flat one.
Related resources
January 3, 2010 2:17:12 AM

When you say "or have a rounded top instead of a flat one" what do you mean with that?
a b B Homebuilt system
January 3, 2010 2:39:10 AM

He means bulging. There can be all sorts of stuff going on. PSU? Did you try the outlet for power that you were using when you used it? Maybe the power on the plug its on now is unstable. Was it in storage for a few years and got dusty/rusted? Clean it out.

Those are just a few examples.

I sold my friend my 3200+ with a 6600GT a mobo and RAM like 2 years ago and 6 months to a year ago he started telling me that it was crashing all the time and messing up. A month or two ago I bought it back for not much to use it as a home server (which helped him pay for upgrading) and it's been running solid (under linux of course) ever since. I'm not really sure what the problem was but it doesn't exist now. (he has dogs who hate people so I couldn't actually go there and look.)
a b B Homebuilt system
January 3, 2010 2:49:32 AM

It might be a temperature related issue. If the PC was stored or a bit of time, I'd blow out all of the old dirt/dust. I'd boot the system into the BIOS and watch/monitor the temperatures (mainly the CPU) and see if it can stay stable for 20-30 min. If it doesn't stay stable and is continually rises in temperature, than you might have a CPU HSF connection issue. This would require pulling off the CPU HSF and cleaning off the thermal paste off of the CPU and the CPU HSF. Then re-apply some new paste and repeat the thermal test in the BIOS.

If you temperatures are stable, than I'd look at the voltages in the BIOS too. This might show you whether or not your PSU is outputting the correct voltages to your computer parts. If it isn't, than you'd know that you need to replace the PSU.
January 8, 2010 3:44:24 PM

Ive tested the Temps its fine. Tested 2 diffrent PSUs. and 2 diffrent Harddrives. and nothing seems to work lol.
a b B Homebuilt system
January 8, 2010 9:00:37 PM

Did you have the complete system specs of this system?? It helps us to help you troubleshoot your problem(s). Please include the PSU make and models (both of the ones you tried)??
!