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Is there a difference in processing speed hardwire vs wifi

Tags:
  • WiFi
  • Notebooks
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Wireless Networking
Last response: in Wireless Networking
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Anonymous
a b α HP
March 19, 2010 9:18:25 AM

Hello,
I have a hp touchscreen IQ524 that has been converted to Windows 7 and a HP dv6365 entertainment notebook with VISTA
both are run on WIFI the IQ has a ffaster processor yet the notebook processes faster. Wold the IQ run faster if it was hardwired in does it really make a difference to run hardwire or WIFI through a router?

More about : difference processing speed hardwire wifi

Anonymous
a b α HP
March 19, 2010 12:46:49 PM

There's a big difference in speed between wireless and wired -- firstly wireless is duplex, which translates to 50% loss of speed then there are the vagaries of reception and interference.

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l
March 21, 2010 5:23:16 PM

Wired connections with an Ethernet cable run at 100mbps [mega bit per second]. Unless you have gigabit hardware (NIC's & Router) and gigabit approved cabling, then you are looking at 1000mbps [1gbps].

Wireless connections, at their MAXIMUM speed can run at the following;

"G" rated routers - 54mbps MAX
"N" rated routers - 300mbps MAX.

Some router manufacturers claim that they can achieve higher, i.e Belkin, if you use their branded/approved NIC's [receivers] but I have found little evidence to suggest that these claims are worth pursuing.

You usually find that you will only get the full signal if you are in the same room as the router.

Also worth remembering that the computers must have compatible Wirless NIC's. What that means is; if you have an N router, which outputs at 300mbps & greater range than a G router, then the laptop which is to receive the signal from the N router must have a wireless card/receiver/nic which is N as well. If it is just a G receiver with an N router, then the connection will only be as fast as the G receiver.
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Anonymous
a b α HP
April 14, 2010 10:49:19 PM

robjohnston said:
Wired connections with an Ethernet cable run at 100mbps [mega bit per second]. Unless you have gigabit hardware (NIC's & Router) and gigabit approved cabling, then you are looking at 1000mbps [1gbps].

Wireless connections, at their MAXIMUM speed can run at the following;

"G" rated routers - 54mbps MAX
"N" rated routers - 300mbps MAX.

Some router manufacturers claim that they can achieve higher, i.e Belkin, if you use their branded/approved NIC's [receivers] but I have found little evidence to suggest that these claims are worth pursuing.

You usually find that you will only get the full signal if you are in the same room as the router.

Also worth remembering that the computers must have compatible Wirless NIC's. What that means is; if you have an N router, which outputs at 300mbps & greater range than a G router, then the laptop which is to receive the signal from the N router must have a wireless card/receiver/nic which is N as well. If it is just a G receiver with an N router, then the connection will only be as fast as the G receiver.


Thanks Rob,

Your final comment was a piece of data I was looking for. It seemed obvious but I wanted to check that 'N" and 'G' could operate simultaneously albeit that the device with 'G' will only operate at that speed and that there were no issues as with 'A/B' and 'G' i.e the whole being restricted to 'G'.

Cheers Mike
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