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What is a dual loop? What components would a dual loop have?

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July 29, 2012 8:44:56 PM

Title pretty much sums it up.
What consists of a single loop, and what consists of a dual loop?
Can you get triple loops etc?
July 29, 2012 8:48:30 PM

Lutfij said:
^ its not a troll question, now is it?


Nope.
Perhaps you should consider treating people nice, just thought I'd put that out there.
a c 78 K Overclocking
July 29, 2012 8:48:39 PM

^ its not a troll question, now is it?
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a c 78 K Overclocking
July 29, 2012 8:52:10 PM

then you'd definitely need to read the watercooling stikcy about the number of loops - in my sig.

Btw, what dya want to run on the third loop?

* I did treat you nice, can't help it if you didn't read it right :sarcastic: 
July 29, 2012 9:02:46 PM

Lutfij said:
then you'd definitely need to read the watercooling stikcy about the number of loops - in my sig.

Btw, what dya want to run on the third loop?

* I did treat you nice, can't help it if you didn't read it right :sarcastic: 

Um actually you can by explaining it, or not commenting at all in the first place.
I didn't criticise your grammar, now did I?

Let's do it this way.

1.1
"Another short answer; in almost every case, no. Having two dedicated loops that are completely segregated not only requires a pump for each, they also lack the overall cooling potential of the total radiators being implemented."

-What I got from the above is that a WC kit for the CPU is also called a loop. That makes 1 one loop onto one component on one motherboard, correct?
Meaning if I cool my GPU with a tube leading from my CPU to GPU that's still one whole loop.
But when does it become two loops?
When they share none of the hardware? When they share some of the hardware, like radiator/reservoir but not pump?

1.2
"If you were to comprise two setups- one single loop, one dual loop, and use the exact same watercooling hardware, you'd find that the single loop (even if using both pumps) would cool better due to the combined dissipation potential of the radiators from the dual loop setup."

-But surely if I was to purchase a wc kit just strong enough to power my cpu loop, and brought a separate kit just strong enough to power 4 GPU's, I'll be able to maximise the cooling potential of both kits.

The above example (1.2) states that if I used two copies of one kit, the kit being strong enough to handle CPU + GPU.
If I was to use this kit on just the GPU, I wont be making use of all of it, but if I have two different loops and used all of my kits potential for the loop it was built for, it wouldn't make a difference.

1.3
"You would be able to take advantage of the extra radiator space from the dual loop's CPU loop to help cool the GPUs when running a single, overall loop."

What if I brought a radiator that can handle my CPU well, but only handle my CPU.
And another radiator that can handle 4 GPU's, but handle them well.

Do these differences in the equation give me an advantage or disadvantage in performance?
a c 78 K Overclocking
July 29, 2012 9:46:36 PM

Quote:
When they share none of the hardware?

yeah

you call one roller coaster ride one because its just one coaster going all over the park. It may have more than one theme as you go along(i.e: cpu, GPU, chipset, cpu) but its still called one ride.

Quote:
What if I brought a radiator that can handle my CPU well, but only handle my CPU.
And another radiator that can handle 4 GPU's, but handle them well.

Do these differences in the equation give me an advantage or disadvantage in performance?

[:lutfij:2]well, you just gave me the benefit of doubt as you just skimmed through the sticky.

It actually details out the way you can setup a loop.

if you got one loop to regulate(not power) your components temps, you'll notice that the temps of the cpu doesn't drop much even if you have a tri sli setup. Watercooling mainly sees a person drop his load temps by nearly half, regardless of having 2 or 3 cards in the mix. ofc you'd need to calc the TDP of your components to get the right rad for the job.

having two loops will mean having one handle the cpu and the other, the gpu. however if your getting one kit(depends on the kit pricing) for only one cpu - its just a lost venture. This wouldn't be the case if you had an EVGA SRx/2/3 board with two xeons and having a bunch of cards to go on.

if you have the TDP calc and the hardware selection done right, you can have all your components run in one loop and be done with it.

^ all of this was answered in the sticky
Quote:
Um actually you can by explaining it...
and a google search will even give you the up(and down)side of having a single/dual and/or parallel/serial loop.

btw your initial post seemed like a troll post because its troll who post "title says it all...snip snip" and by this I mean mods can have the post delete if they choose to.
July 29, 2012 11:07:01 PM

Lutfij said:
Quote:
When they share none of the hardware?

yeah

you call one roller coaster ride one because its just one coaster going all over the park. It may have more than one theme as you go along(i.e: cpu, GPU, chipset, cpu) but its still called one ride.

Quote:
What if I brought a radiator that can handle my CPU well, but only handle my CPU.
And another radiator that can handle 4 GPU's, but handle them well.

Do these differences in the equation give me an advantage or disadvantage in performance?

[:lutfij:2]well, you just gave me the benefit of doubt as you just skimmed through the sticky.

It actually details out the way you can setup a loop.

if you got one loop to regulate(not power) your components temps, you'll notice that the temps of the cpu doesn't drop much even if you have a tri sli setup. Watercooling mainly sees a person drop his load temps by nearly half, regardless of having 2 or 3 cards in the mix. ofc you'd need to calc the TDP of your components to get the right rad for the job.

having two loops will mean having one handle the cpu and the other, the gpu. however if your getting one kit(depends on the kit pricing) for only one cpu - its just a lost venture. This wouldn't be the case if you had an EVGA SRx/2/3 board with two xeons and having a bunch of cards to go on.

if you have the TDP calc and the hardware selection done right, you can have all your components run in one loop and be done with it.

^ all of this was answered in the sticky
Quote:
Um actually you can by explaining it...
and a google search will even give you the up(and down)side of having a single/dual and/or parallel/serial loop.

btw your initial post seemed like a troll post because its troll who post "title says it all...snip snip" and by this I mean mods can have the post delete if they choose to.

I appreciate you answering my questions finally, but don't appreciate you misqouting me as if nor I or anyone else can simply read the initial post.
I say "Title pretty much sums it up. " and then continue onto elaborate just incase anyone wanted me too with "What consists of a single loop, and what consists of a dual loop?
Can you get triple loops etc?"

Btw could you link me to the part in the sticky where it "details out the way you can setup a loop.", or just give me the title of that section so I can Ctrl + F it.
If not, then thanks for your input thus far.
a c 78 K Overclocking
July 29, 2012 11:08:43 PM

sorry too lazy to help another lazy bloke :) 
cheers.
July 29, 2012 11:44:50 PM

Lutfij said:
sorry too lazy to help another lazy bloke :) 
cheers.

You backed out of that one and the mis-quote quite well.
a c 294 K Overclocking
July 30, 2012 12:00:00 AM

Enough with the insults.
a c 324 K Overclocking
July 30, 2012 1:46:36 PM

Radikulram-

This is discussed in the sticky, and not only within one section. There is a lot of information that is listed and discussed as well as linked to other threads that helps explain this.

Yes, you can have as many loops as you wish, but why? A good single loop will perform as good as a double loop without the additional setup and maintenance of more than one loop.

Quote:
1.1
"Another short answer; in almost every case, no. Having two dedicated loops that are completely segregated not only requires a pump for each, they also lack the overall cooling potential of the total radiators being implemented."

-What I got from the above is that a WC kit for the CPU is also called a loop. That makes 1 one loop onto one component on one motherboard, correct?
Meaning if I cool my GPU with a tube leading from my CPU to GPU that's still one whole loop.
But when does it become two loops?
When they share none of the hardware? When they share some of the hardware, like radiator/reservoir but not pump?


Two loops means that there are 2 completely segregated loops of water cooling separate components. None of the water from either loop contacts the other loop.


Quote:
1.2
"If you were to comprise two setups- one single loop, one dual loop, and use the exact same watercooling hardware, you'd find that the single loop (even if using both pumps) would cool better due to the combined dissipation potential of the radiators from the dual loop setup."

-But surely if I was to purchase a wc kit just strong enough to power my cpu loop, and brought a separate kit just strong enough to power 4 GPU's, I'll be able to maximise the cooling potential of both kits.

The above example (1.2) states that if I used two copies of one kit, the kit being strong enough to handle CPU + GPU.
If I was to use this kit on just the GPU, I wont be making use of all of it, but if I have two different loops and used all of my kits potential for the loop it was built for, it wouldn't make a difference.


You are missing the point. If you bought components to cool a CPU only loop as well as the components for a 4x GPU only loop, you'd get better cooling potential if you ran all these components together and not separately because you'd also have the additional pump and radiator from the CPU loop to also help cool the GPUs. This says nothing about using the same hardware to cool a CPU and GPU...its meaning using the same hardware that would comprise separate CPU only and GPU only loops and comparing in that way. You aren't going to find a 'kit' that is going to apply for GPU cooling, you will have to decide what is needed for those. Kits typically only exist for a CPU only loop.

Quote:
1.3
"You would be able to take advantage of the extra radiator space from the dual loop's CPU loop to help cool the GPUs when running a single, overall loop."

What if I brought a radiator that can handle my CPU well, but only handle my CPU.
And another radiator that can handle 4 GPU's, but handle them well.

Do these differences in the equation give me an advantage or disadvantage in performance?


This would be what you would want to do in any situation, and you aren't often going to find a single radiator to handle 4x high-end GPUs; you will likely need more than 1. How do you determine what you need? This is covered in the watercooling sticky with great detail.
!