Loop Cooling question

This is my first build ever and I already have a case that came pre-installed with a kit. I'm going to change out the CPU cooling and put one that matches my socket type. I was just Curious if this setup would cool a CPU and 3 EVGA 580's? What would I need to add to make it sufficient?

This is the case: http://www.frozencpu.com/products/14189/cst-1229/Custom_Cooler_Master_HAF-X_Full_Tower_Liquid_Cooled_Case_-_Push_Pull_Edition_XSPC_Rasa_RS360_Installed.html
17 answers Last reply
More about loop cooling question
  1. You will need to get the waterblocks for the 580's. Koolance, EK, and Heatkiller are popular ones.
    GPU Blocks

    For 3 580's you will also need at least 1 more 360 radiator and another smaller one, if not 2 more 360 rads. This can be found out by adding the TDP of the three 580's (I believe it is 244. So 244X3= a total TDP of 732) and the TDP of your CPU block and then find the heat dissipated by the radiator. You can find out how to better do this in the sticky and the links found within.
    Radiators

    You may need to upgrade the pump. I would find a good review of it and find the head pressure and gp/m and make sure your loop won't be too restrictive.
    Pumps

    All of those links are in the sticky and I suggest you take a good look at The Sticky V2 to get a better understanding. It has all of the info you will need, and then you can customize your loop with exactly what you want/need.
  2. Quote:
    I was just Curious if this setup would cool a CPU and 3 EVGA 580's?


    No. You need to determine your total loop TDP and build from there. (Hint: a single GTX 580 has a TDP of 244w; most Ivy Bridge/Sandy Bridge CPUs are TDP of 95w-130w, depending on actual chip. You have 3x 580's and 1 CPU...then compare with the load potential of a single RS360.) (Hint #2: RS360 dissipates around 525w for 10 degree Celsius delta w/1800 rpm, fans and 1.5 gpm flow)

    Quote:
    What would I need to add to make it sufficient?


    Another radiator and a better pump.

    Please read through the watercooling sticky as it covers these concepts.
  3. Well I kind of feel like I wasted some money with that case. Also the 580's have the cooling plate on them already they are the hydro copper classified version. I'll start looking around hopefully soon to see what I need by the information you guys gave me. I'm so busy most of the time when I do have free time I just feel like relaxing.
  4. Looking at computer hardware is relaxing :)
  5. Quote:
    Well I kind of feel like I wasted some money with that case. Also the 580's have the cooling plate on them already they are the hydro copper classified version.


    Yes, but you still need to dissipate the heat that is being put out by these cards. Waterblocks to not cool the water; they allow heat energy transfer to take place and allow the heat to be moved through the loop to the radiators. Blocks or not, you need to account for the radiators if you are going to watercool these cards.
  6. +1 to Rubix's remarks - radiators make all the difference.

    If you haven't purchased the EVGA 580 Hydrocoppers yet, I wouldn't. You have better part options with the GTX 670 and soon-to-be GTX 660Ti, and the HydroCopper waterblocks don't perform as well as other blocks.
  7. Well another question is should I get blocks for my motherboard? Or should I just worry about my GPU's and my CPU?
  8. I've had some of the parts for some time. Just havn't put it together because I had a feeling it wouldn't cool correctly. I asked other people on another forum they should it should be good. But now I know.
  9. Cooling your mobo will be simply for looks, and could add a decent amount of heat into your loop that you would need to factor in with the radiators. I would pass, but that's up to you.

    You simply have too much heat coming out of the GPUs to cool your system effectively with the RS360. Since your case is already set up for a 360 rad, I would simply swap out the RS360 with an RX360 (thicker than RS360) or EX360 (same thickness as RS360), and maybe look into adding a 240 rad somewhere else in the case (if your setup deems it necessary).
  10. Quote:
    Cooling your mobo will be simply for looks, and could add a decent amount of heat into your loop that you would need to factor in with the radiators. I would pass, but that's up to you.
    +1 ^

    I was wondering, cooling the mobo with such hassle , to me seems too much trouble - just adds more heat to the loop. Not a problem if you're running a cpu +1 gpu only loop, but with that many gpu's - thas a lot of raddage to manage.
  11. This is a ridiculous question but I was wondering if it was possible to somewhat stack the radiators instead of putting them in a rad box out side of a case.
  12. You don't want to stack rads, you end up losing around 30-40% of the 2nd radiator's cooling capacity this way.
  13. Yeah rad stacking isn't normally a good idea (well, ever), though it would be interesting to see the results of rad stacking with some stronger fans (Ultra Kaze/Deltas).

    I'd call it the Big Mac Rad Stack :D
  14. :lol: big mac, that makes me hungry!
  15. I think if you ran really strong fans and low FPI rads you could 'get away with it', but still would want maybe a little spacing between if possible. I would test this out with my MCR's and Ultra Kaze's if I had the extra time to pull the rads and bench this way.

    But I don't.
  16. swiftech were the ones who first came out with the sandwiching technique - didn't fare well with users though.
  17. Yeah, it's also the first time they put I/O ports on two sides of their MCR rads. Neat idea, poor to lame performance.
Ask a new question

Read More

Water Cooling Cooling Cases CPUs Overclocking