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Netbook power consumption

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March 11, 2010 6:28:13 AM

Hi guys,

Any of you have tested power consumption and performance on netbooks plugged with LED Monitor as external display.. what's the average on watts/hours if we do office/productivity apps compare with other mobile processors.

Cheers

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a c 122 à CPUs
March 11, 2010 6:43:24 AM
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Here is an idea of a Netbooks power consumption:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/atom-d510-d510mo,25...

A Notebook with the new Core i3:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/mobile-core-i5-arra...

The CPU itself normally takes about 8-15w depending on which one you get at maximum load. This shows the Atom based Netbook at 25-26w under full load while the Core i3 hits 54w under full load.

So in essence, this would be the more efficient way to go for office productivity compared to a non Netbook based CPU.
a b à CPUs
March 11, 2010 12:15:29 PM

The netbook will consume around 30 watts. If you use an external monitor, that could be another 50 watts. So that's around 80 watts total.

If you use a desktop, it will consume about 70-100 watts. So with a monitor, that's 120-150 watts.
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March 11, 2010 12:40:47 PM

gracefully said:
The netbook will consume around 30 watts.


I've never seen my netbook (N270 plus crappy Intel IGP) go over 12W, even under load. Though that's power draw from the battery, so it would take a bit more from the wall.

I'd guess that would also go down a couple of watts if using an external monitor.
March 18, 2010 12:54:55 AM

Best answer selected by r2rdcroix.
March 18, 2010 2:15:17 AM

MarkG said:
I've never seen my netbook (N270 plus crappy Intel IGP) go over 12W, even under load. Though that's power draw from the battery, so it would take a bit more from the wall.

I'd guess that would also go down a couple of watts if using an external monitor.

This man is right. The "best answer" is wrong on power consumption numbers (but still correct that the atom is less power consuming than a non-atom processor). Refer to my article on SPCR where I compared the netbook to my old Pentium M laptop, it should answer plenty of questions:
http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=53...
a c 122 à CPUs
March 18, 2010 7:00:04 AM

joefriday said:
This man is right. The "best answer" is wrong on power consumption numbers (but still correct that the atom is less power consuming than a non-atom processor). Refer to my article on SPCR where I compared the netbook to my old Pentium M laptop, it should answer plenty of questions:
http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=53...


Not sure how its wrong. The Netbook that you used is different from the one I found on THG so power numbers will be different.

But yours is comparing it to a much older Pentium M instead of something more modern like a Core i3.

I thought a Core i3 for comparison would be better since thats more towards what you will find laptop wise.

I wish every Atom based Netbook would have the same power usage, but thats not possible since evry OEM is different in what they will give it beyond the CPU/mobo, hell some even have a discrete GPU for gaming that will up the power usage.
March 18, 2010 1:44:41 PM

jimmysmitty said:
Not sure how its wrong. The Netbook that you used is different from the one I found on THG so power numbers will be different.


Unless I'm mistaken, the THG article you linked to isn't even testing netbooks, they're desktop systems. The article itself says that the D510 is a desktop dual-core Atom with a power-consumption more than twice as high as the single-core aimed at netbooks.
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