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HeatKiller CPU Rev3.0 or Raystorm Full Copper

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August 2, 2012 9:16:00 PM

hello folks,
i'm having a hard time deciding, i'm stuck in choosing between the heatkiller cpu rev3.0 and raystorm full copper. i can get either one of them at the same price. i already have heatkiller gpu water block for my two gtx680 video cards and so i would like to have the same brand water block for my cpu as well to keep the brand/style coordinated, however i also understand that the heatkiller cpu rev3.0 is much older than the raystorm full copper. probably by a few years.

i was getting ready to check out on the heatkiller but decided to hold back and make a post to see if i can get some inputs instead.

currently i'm leaning toward the heatkiller simply for look and style. but if the cooling performance of the raystorm is significantly better than heatkiller than i will have to deal with it and get the raystorm. but if it's only better by 1 to 2 celsius than i will just deal with the lesser performance and get the heatkiller.

also i understand that the raystorm surface has a slight "bow" or "curve" which is specifically design for the 1155 or sandy bridge processor. i was wondering if this is something else that give it this slight performance edge over the competitors.

the heatkiller cpu block i'm refering to is the full copper block.

so please post if you have some first hand experience with either one, or both that would be even better.

thanks for any inputs folks
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 2, 2012 9:23:36 PM

from both sides of the story, the blocks are upto user preference. Martinsliquidlab did mention the copper raystorm(which I'm also getting for my AMS build) has the highest restrictions of all the blocks tested.

so if it were me, its a tie with performance and the heatkiller is an old block. In fact you might want to check out the EK Supremacy :)  if its performance you're after.
August 2, 2012 9:35:45 PM

i've heard of the ek supremacy, but it's a bit out of my spending budget right now. i trying to spend less than $100 to stay under the wife's radar.
but i'm mainly interested in the heatkiller and raystorm right now, but main heatkiller due to maintaining the coordinated looks with my current equipment with them.
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a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 2, 2012 9:38:27 PM

the raystorm full copper edition is about $120 on frozen cpu, a lil less on performance pc - $100. EK supramacy is less than that.

But if you're talking about the vanilla raystorm, then get that over the Heatkiller.
August 2, 2012 10:04:20 PM

raystorm full copper is on sale for $95 at sidewinder.
heatkiller and back plate is also $95 at frozen cpu.
same price for both. so you think both of these puts out almost similar cooling performance.
i'm going to add it to my current loop that has two gpu block that is running in parallel. perhaps i will put the cpu block before the two gpu blocks.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 2, 2012 10:11:11 PM

you don't need the back plate. As of late 2011, they include hex screws and washers to mount it to your board. All you have to do is select the appropriate socket.

Yeah I got mine from Sidewinder

* the raystorm is the most restrictive, have you read up on it?
August 2, 2012 11:55:10 PM

martins liquid lab review said the raystorm has very low restriction. this is the all copper raystorm, and also the one i'm refering to. i couldn't find any review for the heatkiller cpu rev3.0.

where did you read about the raystorm being restrictive?
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 12:13:57 AM

on martinsliquidlab...the vanilla has the lower restriction. the copper raystorm is higher.


on his follow up tests on other blocks, you'll see the copper raystorm is the highest of block restrictions.
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 4:09:17 AM

http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_p...

The copper version of the Heatkiller is $84.95 on PerformancePc.com and maybe this is a new upgrade but it says it comes with an inserter plate to divert the flo of the liquid to cover the two dies in a quad core cpu.
I have a Kryos cpu water block and it is very similar in size and style that if you look at it and don't see the name you would think it was a heatkiller cpu block. The block works great and keeps the temps down even under load no caores have gone over 50c.
a b K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 9:44:42 AM

If you want pure performance, get the Koolance CPU block. If you want price/performance, get the vanilla Raystorm. Performance should be very close between the 2.
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 11:35:17 AM

xxcysxx said:
hello folks,
i'm having a hard time deciding, i'm stuck in choosing between the heatkiller cpu rev3.0 and raystorm full copper. i can get either one of them at the same price. i already have heatkiller gpu water block for my two gtx680 video cards and so i would like to have the same brand water block for my cpu as well to keep the brand/style coordinated, however i also understand that the heatkiller cpu rev3.0 is much older than the raystorm full copper. probably by a few years.

i was getting ready to check out on the heatkiller but decided to hold back and make a post to see if i can get some inputs instead.

currently i'm leaning toward the heatkiller simply for look and style. but if the cooling performance of the raystorm is significantly better than heatkiller than i will have to deal with it and get the raystorm. but if it's only better by 1 to 2 celsius than i will just deal with the lesser performance and get the heatkiller.

also i understand that the raystorm surface has a slight "bow" or "curve" which is specifically design for the 1155 or sandy bridge processor. i was wondering if this is something else that give it this slight performance edge over the competitors.

the heatkiller cpu block i'm refering to is the full copper block.

so please post if you have some first hand experience with either one, or both that would be even better.

thanks for any inputs folks


I would suggest sticking with the Heatkiller line simply because they had to take into consideration the flow rate necessary to run their CPU blocks with their GPU blocks, flow rate was an issue I encountered with my 2 Heatkiller 580GTX water blocks using a XSPC Rasa water block with pretty high restriction.

To get the flow rate I needed I switched to a Danger Den, (that I already owned), simply because of the flow rate.

Now when it comes to looks the Heatkiller GPU blocks are really nice, the lost aspect of the looks is once the computer is standing upright you don't see the looks of the Heatkiller block anymore.

I don't see any mention of your pump, but the water blocks working good together is at least a consideration to take seriously and since Heatkiller knows full well their components will be used together, I feel confident they took that into consideration in their manufacturing.

So I suggest going with the Heatkiller CPU block, performance difference between the Heatkiller and XSPC won't be that big a deal anyway.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 11:53:48 AM

wow, didn't see it like that :)  +5 ^
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 3:47:08 PM

It could be one of those endless debates because every manufacturer will say thier block is the best and was tested by every expert and on top of that you will always get individuals who swear by thier cooler and it's the best.
The tesk will be to read through the feedback and reviews left by customers and the written reviews by these testing sites that will take the time to run each block through a series of tests and come up with a list of best to not so best.
I have used a lot of different blocks since I have had water cooling for a number of years and there are brands that I felt were good and would consistantly produce top quality blocks. The Swiftech Appogee line is one of those good lines and would be recomended. The Heatkiller lins also is a good line and comes recomended.
Currentky I have the Kryos block which has been extensivly tested against all the competition and has come out on top and all I can tell you is that it keeps my six core cool and no matter what I'm doing there are no heat issues so that's what matters to me and as I have stated it kind of has a Heatkiller look. With a side window this cpu block stands out and looks good.
August 3, 2012 4:27:32 PM

i'm not quite sure of my flow rates at this point. i'm also not fully aware of my flow restriction all this time either, how do i measure this stuff? i just bench test my setup for about a week on the table to check for any leaks before i fully commit it to my system. i didn't have any knowledge on how to measure my flow rates.
i'll post some pictures of my setup in a few minutes, perhaps you can make better judgement of my system and give me more advice on how i can improve it.

be right back folks.
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 4:31:36 PM

What pump are you using?
August 3, 2012 5:37:17 PM

oh, i cant post pictures. why? do i have to meet a limited number of post to post pictures or something?

i'm using the danger den cpx-pro pump buy the way.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 5:48:50 PM

open an acc on photobucket and link them here.
August 3, 2012 5:56:27 PM

what difference does it make? i use dropbox and i just copy the public link. that should work. i posted pictures on other forums just fine, the html tags should be the same everywhere, yes?
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 5:58:26 PM

I use Image shack and thier links are one for public and one for forums. So I don't know if drop box has that or if they just use one url.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 6:00:16 PM

Quote:
what difference does it make? i use dropbox and i just copy the public link. that should work. i posted pictures on other forums just fine, the html tags should be the same everywhere
^ if you're hell bent on changing how this forum works - be my guest. Just telling you how it is mate..:) 

[img ] your image link here [/img](remove the spaces)
August 3, 2012 6:07:17 PM

ok i got it. it's the drop box. i just tried a picture from my comcast storage and it post just fine. that's weird. the drop box works just fine on other forums i've been to like macrumors, craigslist, act.

i'll transfer my photos to comcast and try again.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 6:25:02 PM

Make sure you use open/close tags when you post it.
August 3, 2012 6:55:05 PM

ok, here it is. i finally got the pictures uploaded to the comcast storage. and i do use that same tages like you suggested, but for some reason it doesn't like the public link from dropbox. oh well.

let me know what you think folks.







a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 6:57:16 PM

Great build...I like small case builds with watercooling.

What massive rad do you have, there?
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 7:08:18 PM

I guess th radiator doesn't fit inside the case. It looks like you can easily add a cpu block and not have to change the radiator.
You have mentioned about staying with the heatkiller cpu because you want to keep the same brand going through the Pc but you don't have a side window so whatever cpu block you get can't be seen and that should allow you to get the best performing block vs going with the heatkiller regardless of where it falls performance wise. I would say to get the heatkiller if it performs the best of what your choosing from , b ut if the Raystorm or other block performs better then you should go with the better block.
A full tower with a window will really show off your computer as to how nice it would look.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 7:12:13 PM

alphacool monsta 4x120 :)  I'm getting the 2x120 version. I also like small case watercooling, just a lot more patience needed to work in one.
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 7:14:06 PM

No, that's got four fans so it has to be the 4x120 Monsta. I gotta get me one of those.
August 3, 2012 7:51:13 PM

well, it is still a work in progress. it's the only project i have for this summer since school was out.
i wanted to keep it as small and as simple as possible just to play games, and keep its portability so i can carry it around with a strap. the whole water cooling mumbo jumbo was not part of the plan, and so was the second video card. i just suddenly got greedy for performance while playing game and decided to add another video card, and then later found out the second card got hot, and then comes the water cooling idea. and now i cant just leave the cpu undressed up like the video cards.

here is a photo of my built before the water-cooling stuff. check out how close the video cards are stacked so closely together. i had to tweak the fan with precision x to run full throttle just to keep the second card below 60c, at auto the temp climb to 80c. that is ridiculous!
but on water it hangs around 24 - 25 c on both cards while gaming and just fluctuates back and fourth between that two figures on both cards all the time. it's refreshing! now i got to get the cpu block as well.

a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 8:18:08 PM

Yes that first card doesn't have much room to get air and even the second card is close to the bottom of the case , I can see why you needed water cooling.
August 3, 2012 9:55:02 PM

what is the purpose of the back plate? is it something that will come with the waterblock when i buy it, or do i have to get it as an addition item. does it add extra support to cpu mounting area when the water block is mounted?

i know someone mention it is not needed, but i was wondering why they bother to make it if it's not needed. if it's just for aesthetic then i don't think that part is going to bling for being behind the main board.

a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 10:14:54 PM

heatkillers are a really old block - about more than 2 years old. back then the mechanism for adding pressure to their blocks was bad. the only way to compensate for the loss in installation pressure was to add a back plate and the mobo's back then were flimsy. Now you have dual layer pcb, ultra durable and as of mid this year, fibre glass pcb tech. Which makes the boards more rigid and withstand some abuse from large coolers. So all you'll need is some washers for that heatkiller block. BTW the washers(in red) come with the block when purchased. The backplate isn't necessary - drop watercool(heatkiller) a mail and ask them about it if you're unsatisfied with my advice.

I know cos I looked up almost all blocks before gunning for the raystorm copper for my Q9550.
August 3, 2012 10:29:19 PM

but the raystorm and cuplex kryos includes back plate with their kits as a standard item. so are they not necessary and people are not using them too?
its strange why watercool decided not to include a back plate with their water block when everyone else does.
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 11:06:00 PM

I think that the back plate is just for additional support for the block when being installed plus the back plate is threaded so it makes it an intergral part of the assebly. The Kryos thast I have is that way and you actually need the back plate for the screw holes because they are threaded on the backplate.
a b à CPUs
a c 76 K Overclocking
August 3, 2012 11:17:26 PM

if you thought about all your questions - you'll realize that "why" doesn't logically have an answer , leading to one asking more why's in the end until the sun sets.

materials behave differently and if you've noticed all of the blocks come in different material and manufacturing process - in fact their internal layout and milling is different from one another. They have been designed by their respective companies to go that way.

Corsair have a plastic bracket for their Hxx's as well as xspc and swiftech. You'll also find that the D5Nos also has a backplate retention mechanism similar to a hollow frame.

Like I said, all your "why this and why that" will be better answered by their respective block manufacturers. Either that's whats pulling you off of your purchase or you're trying to get an answer you already know+have in the back of your mind.

flimsy board, necessitates a backplate to prevent the board from warping. Have a thick enough pcb and the back plate isn't needed. If your retention screws are in need of more load, add a backplate. If manufacturer says you don't need it - then you don't go and buy it.
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 4, 2012 2:51:53 AM

An example of a flimsy MB pcb is this. I have the GigabyteG1 Assassin MB and that thing is solid and won't bend , I had a problem with it so I went and bought a MSI X-Power board of the same chipset anmd when I put the water block on WITH the backplate the thing was so thin that is was bending and I had to back off the screws and fasten the board to the MB plate before I could tighten the cooler back down. So different manufacturers do make thier product different so sometimes you need the backplate and sometimes you don't.
August 4, 2012 3:16:31 AM

that was an interesting read, now it make sense. didn't thought about main board stiffness veries from manufacture to manufacture. i didn't take this into consideration at all.
oh well, i'll just get the back plate anyway just incase if i do notice any significant warping when installing, and perhaps it will help the resale later when i decide to sell it to try something else.

i'm off to get my new heatkiller water block now. thank you everyone for the helpfull inputs. :) 
a c 214 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 4, 2012 3:15:45 PM

Also as in the case of the Kyos block the back plate is an intergral part of the assembly and you ned it because the screw holes are in the back plate for the screw bolts that tighten down the block. So in some cases that's why the back plte is included and I have run into others that are the same way.
!