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Diff between sata2 and sata3 hd

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December 25, 2011 11:57:16 AM

hello
what is the diff in performance between sata2 and sata3 hd.thanks in advance

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a c 261 G Storage
December 25, 2011 1:40:39 PM

Theoretically SATA6Gb (3) HDD is faster but it is only SSD's that are currently able to max out the the SATA3Gb (2) interface. Basically that means there is no noticeable difference between HDD drives whether they are SATA 3 or 2.
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December 25, 2011 2:02:21 PM

SATA revision 2.0 (SATA 3 Gbit/s) Second generation SATA interfaces running at
3.0 Gbit/s shipped in high volume by 2010, and were prevalent in all[citation needed] SATA disk drives and most PC and server chipsets. With a
native transfer rate of 3.0 Gbit/s, and taking 8b/10b encoding into account, the maximum uncoded transfer rate is 2.4 Gbit/s (300 MB/s). The
theoretical burst throughput of SATA 3.0 Gbit/s is
roughly double that of SATA revision 1. All SATA data cables meeting the SATA spec are
rated for 3.0 Gbit/s and will handle current
mechanical drives without any loss of sustained
and burst data transfer performance. However,
high-performance flash drives are approaching the
SATA 3 Gbit/s transfer rate; this is addressed with the SATA 6 Gbit/s interoperability standard. SATA revision 3.0 (SATA 6 Gbit/s) Serial ATA International Organization presented the draft specification of SATA 6 Gbit/s physical layer in July 2008,[9] and ratified its physical layer specification on August 18, 2008.[10] The full 3.0 standard was released on May 27, 2009.[11] It provides peak throughput of about 600 Mbit/s
(Megabits per second) including the protocol
overhead (10b/8b coding with 8 bits to one byte).
Solid-state drives have already saturated SATA 3
Gbit/s with 285/275 MB/s max read/write speed
and 250 MB/s sustained with the Sandforce 1200 and 1500 controller. SandForce SSD controllers released in 2011 have delivered 500 MB/s read/ write rates,[12] and ten channels of fast flash can reach well over 500 MB/s with ONFI drives – a move from SATA 3 Gbit/s to SATA 6 Gbit/s allows such
devices to work at their full speed. Full performance
from Crucial's C300 SSD similarly require SATA 3.0.
Standard hard disks cannot transfer data fast
enough to require more than 3 Gbit/s; but they can
nevertheless benefit from the later standard as reads from their built-in DRAM cache will be faster across the later interface.[13] According to Seagate "Cache-efficient desktop applications such as
gaming, graphics design and digital video editing
can experience immediate incremental
performance using a SATA 6Gb/s interface". Drives
with bigger, faster caches were introduced to benefit from the faster interface.[14] The 3.0 specification contains the following
changes: 6 Gbit/s for scalable performance Continued compatibility with SAS, including SAS 6
Gbit/s. "A SAS domain may support attachment to
and control of unmodified SATA devices
connected directly into the SAS domain using the
Serial ATA Tunneled Protocol (STP)" from the
SATA_Revision_3_0_Gold specification. Isochronous Native Command Queuing (NCQ) streaming command to enable isochronous quality of service data transfers for streaming
digital content applications. An NCQ Management feature that helps optimize
performance by enabling host processing and
management of outstanding NCQ commands. Improved power management capabilities. A small low insertion force (LIF) connector for more compact 1.8-inch storage devices. A connector designed to accommodate 7 mm
optical disk drives for thinner and lighter
notebooks. Alignment with the INCITS ATA8-ACS standard
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a c 317 G Storage
December 25, 2011 2:54:07 PM

xtreme5, easier just to link to the wiki page rather than copy it, don't you think?
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December 25, 2011 3:26:13 PM

xtreme5 said:
SATA revision 2.0 (SATA 3 Gbit/s) Second generation SATA interfaces running at
3.0 Gbit/s shipped in high volume by 2010, and were prevalent in all[citation needed] SATA disk drives and most PC and server chipsets. With a
native transfer rate of 3.0 Gbit/s, and taking 8b/10b encoding into account, the maximum uncoded transfer rate is 2.4 Gbit/s (300 MB/s). The
theoretical burst throughput of SATA 3.0 Gbit/s is
roughly double that of SATA revision 1. All SATA data cables meeting the SATA spec are
rated for 3.0 Gbit/s and will handle current
mechanical drives without any loss of sustained
and burst data transfer performance. However,
high-performance flash drives are approaching the
SATA 3 Gbit/s transfer rate; this is addressed with the SATA 6 Gbit/s interoperability standard. SATA revision 3.0 (SATA 6 Gbit/s) Serial ATA International Organization presented the draft specification of SATA 6 Gbit/s physical layer in July 2008,[9] and ratified its physical layer specification on August 18, 2008.[10] The full 3.0 standard was released on May 27, 2009.[11] It provides peak throughput of about 600 Mbit/s
(Megabits per second) including the protocol
overhead (10b/8b coding with 8 bits to one byte).
Solid-state drives have already saturated SATA 3
Gbit/s with 285/275 MB/s max read/write speed
and 250 MB/s sustained with the Sandforce 1200 and 1500 controller. SandForce SSD controllers released in 2011 have delivered 500 MB/s read/ write rates,[12] and ten channels of fast flash can reach well over 500 MB/s with ONFI drives – a move from SATA 3 Gbit/s to SATA 6 Gbit/s allows such
devices to work at their full speed. Full performance
from Crucial's C300 SSD similarly require SATA 3.0.
Standard hard disks cannot transfer data fast
enough to require more than 3 Gbit/s; but they can
nevertheless benefit from the later standard as reads from their built-in DRAM cache will be faster across the later interface.[13] According to Seagate "Cache-efficient desktop applications such as
gaming, graphics design and digital video editing
can experience immediate incremental
performance using a SATA 6Gb/s interface". Drives
with bigger, faster caches were introduced to benefit from the faster interface.[14] The 3.0 specification contains the following
changes: 6 Gbit/s for scalable performance Continued compatibility with SAS, including SAS 6
Gbit/s. "A SAS domain may support attachment to
and control of unmodified SATA devices
connected directly into the SAS domain using the
Serial ATA Tunneled Protocol (STP)" from the
SATA_Revision_3_0_Gold specification. Isochronous Native Command Queuing (NCQ) streaming command to enable isochronous quality of service data transfers for streaming
digital content applications. An NCQ Management feature that helps optimize
performance by enabling host processing and
management of outstanding NCQ commands. Improved power management capabilities. A small low insertion force (LIF) connector for more compact 1.8-inch storage devices. A connector designed to accommodate 7 mm
optical disk drives for thinner and lighter
notebooks. Alignment with the INCITS ATA8-ACS standard


thanks for the wiki ans as quoted by "real beast" but the point is whether any performance boost in games be obtained when using sata 3 instead of sata2 (both same rpm)
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December 25, 2011 3:28:36 PM

rolli59 said:
Theoretically SATA6Gb (3) HDD is faster but it is only SSD's that are currently able to max out the the SATA3Gb (2) interface. Basically that means there is no noticeable difference between HDD drives whether they are SATA 3 or 2.


thanks for reply mate, so i guess sata2 and sata3 will perform similarly(in game) if other parameters such as rpm is same, isn't it
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a c 317 G Storage
December 25, 2011 5:57:04 PM

anish449 said:
thanks for reply mate, so i guess sata2 and sata3 will perform similarly(in game) if other parameters such as rpm is same, isn't it


Yes, no hdd made (yet) performs better on one than the other since none can saturate a SATA II interface, much less a SATA III. Some of the newest ssds do perform better on SATA III because their reads/writes exceed the SATA II capacity.
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a c 261 G Storage
December 25, 2011 6:40:24 PM

+1^ To really benefit from the SATA 3 you would need a SSD and you are correct about the other parameters.
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December 26, 2011 5:10:20 AM

Best answer selected by anish449.
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!