Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

[Solved] Boot Loop Before BIOS Screen

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
August 1, 2010 2:19:11 AM

I have an Intel i7 860 2.8Ghz installed on the GA-P55A-UD5 motherboard it was working fine until yesterday, I made a BIOS change and used the PC for couple of hours, powered it of, but when I tried to start it up a few hours later, it turns off after a couple of seconds, restarts, turns off, etc. without getting to the BIOS screen.

I have performed the following tests:

1. Pressed the clear CMOS button
2. Removed the battery for an hour
3. Disconnected all other hardware, HDD, DVD-RW, etc.
4. Tried different graphics card
5. Tried different power supply

All of the above made no difference, still reboots before BIOS. The only things left connected are the Power Supply, Motherboard, CPU, RAM and Graphics card.

The are no beeps from the motherboard. The lights shown are:

1. MD1 and MD2 light up then turn off just before reboot
2. GD1 and GD2 light up but stay on until reboot
3. CPU light lights up and stays on until reboot
4. All the Phase LED lights are on until reboot

Any help would be appreciated.
a c 177 V Motherboard
August 1, 2010 2:54:43 AM

First thing to try is the exact procedure outlined in the 'sticky', under "to break a 'boot-loop'"
m
0
l
August 1, 2010 3:05:10 AM

Unfortunately, that procedure doesn't work for me. It still won't get to the BIOS.

My motherboard has a reset CMOS button, but pressing that with the battery in or out makes no difference. Holding the front button does stop the reboots though.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 177 V Motherboard
August 1, 2010 3:38:54 PM

Does doing anything produce 'beeps'? Pulling out the RAM, the VidCard, etc? As the CPU LED is on, is there a possibility you can 'borrow' one from a buddy for testing? It almost sounds like it's not 'doing' POST at all... The typical corrupted CMOS boot loop will usually be a cyclic thing - you often get a pair of attempts to boot, repeating endlessly: first boot 'downs' the power momentarily; second shows POST, beeps, and aborts; rinse, lather, repeat!
m
0
l
a c 716 V Motherboard
August 1, 2010 5:33:14 PM

f302w said:
... working fine until yesterday, I made a BIOS change and used the PC for couple of hours...


What "BIOS Change(s)"? I "get" this is a NO POST issue ~ cause & effect is what interests me. "IF" you've tried everything it limits you to a few things: 1. if the changes was flashing your BIOS ~ corrupted BIOS, 2. PSU, and 3. MOBO ~ cause unknown H/W.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2010 1:22:56 AM

I second the important concept, of if your computer was working fine, then you made a BIOS change, then it is sick, exactly what BIOS change did you make?

If everyone knows what change you made, makes it much easier honing in on what went wrong, and how to correct it.
The focus is a lot different if you made a RAM voltage or frequency change, or if you used the @BIOS utility.

m
0
l
August 16, 2010 10:01:08 AM

Hi All,

Thanks for all your reply's, the problem was with the motherboard.

Took it back from where I bought it, they sent it away and it got fixed by gigabyte.

Gigabyte didn't tell my supplier what the problem was, but it's back up and running now.

Cheers.
m
0
l
June 6, 2012 10:42:22 PM

Hi everyone.

I have the boot-loop problem. My MB is a gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L (1.0). Everything was doing fine until i upgraded the BIOS thorugh the @BIOS utility. Updated to version F9 from Gigabyte official website and afer restart, my computer never got to load the BIOS again. I've tried the BIOS reset through the remove-battery and the CMOS jumper but nothing is working. No overclock on it, and never had a single problem with it :x

Thanks in advance for any advice or answer.

Regards.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 7, 2012 12:12:02 AM

Hi there, and welcome to Tom's Hardware,

Most of the folks will recommend flashing the BIOS only if there is a specific need, and on the Gigabyte boards, using the QFlash appl after downloading the BIOS file on a floppy or USB flash drive. Few will recommend using the Windows @BIOS because of problems and risk of updating with that utility.

Are you able to get to your BIOS splash screen before the bootloop occurs? If so, you can click on <END> key without getting into the BIOS itself and update the BIOS from a flash drive. Or if you backed up the original BIOS file before using @BIOS, you might be able to reload that.

Here's the instructions on page 62 of your manual discussing BIOS updating

4-2-1 Updating the BIOS with the Q-Flash Utility
A. Before You Begin:
1. From GIGABYTE's website, download the latest compressed BIOS update file that matches your motherboard model.
2. Extract the file and save the new BIOS file (e.g. p35ds3l.f1) to your floppy disk, USB flash drive, or hard drive. Note: The USB flash drive or hard drive must use FAT32/16/12 file system.
3. Restart the system. During the POST, press the <End> key to enter Q-Flash. Note: You can access Q-Flash by either pressing the <End> key during the POST or pressing the <F8> key in BIOS Setup. However, if the BIOS update file is saved to a hard drive in RAID/AHCI mode or a hard
drive attached to an independent IDE/SATA controller, use the <End> key during the POST to access Q-Flash.

Because BIOS flashing is potentially risky, please do it with caution. Inadequate BIOS flashing
may result in system malfunction.

If that's not successful, you should follow the instructions on page 29, to reset the CMOS. Requires turning off and unplugging your computer, then shorting out the Clr CMOS pins as instructed.

CLR_CMOS (Clearing CMOS Jumper)
Use this jumper to clear the CMOS values (e.g. date information and BIOS configurations) and reset the CMOS values to factory defaults. To clear the CMOS values, place a jumper cap on the two pins to temporarily short the two pins or use a metal object like a screwdriver to touch the two
pins for a few seconds.
• Always turn off your computer and unplug the power cord from the power outlet before clearing the CMOS values.
• After clearing the CMOS values and before turning on your computer, be sure to remove the jumper cap from the jumper. Failure to do so may cause damage to the motherboard.
• After system restart, go to BIOS Setup to load factory defaults (select Load Optimized Defaults) or manually configure the BIOS settings (refer to Chapter 2, "BIOS Setup," for BIOS configurations).

That should reset it back to the initial BIOS version, to at least get you going.
m
0
l
June 7, 2012 5:56:26 AM

John_VanKirk said:
Hi there, and welcome to Tom's Hardware,

Most of the folks will recommend flashing the BIOS only if there is a specific need, and on the Gigabyte boards, using the QFlash appl after downloading the BIOS file on a floppy or USB flash drive. Few will recommend using the Windows @BIOS because of problems and risk of updating with that utility.

Are you able to get to your BIOS splash screen before the bootloop occurs? If so, you can click on <END> key without getting into the BIOS itself and update the BIOS from a flash drive. Or if you backed up the original BIOS file before using @BIOS, you might be able to reload that.

Here's the instructions on page 62 of your manual discussing BIOS updating

4-2-1 Updating the BIOS with the Q-Flash Utility
A. Before You Begin:
1. From GIGABYTE's website, download the latest compressed BIOS update file that matches your motherboard model.
2. Extract the file and save the new BIOS file (e.g. p35ds3l.f1) to your floppy disk, USB flash drive, or hard drive. Note: The USB flash drive or hard drive must use FAT32/16/12 file system.
3. Restart the system. During the POST, press the <End> key to enter Q-Flash. Note: You can access Q-Flash by either pressing the <End> key during the POST or pressing the <F8> key in BIOS Setup. However, if the BIOS update file is saved to a hard drive in RAID/AHCI mode or a hard
drive attached to an independent IDE/SATA controller, use the <End> key during the POST to access Q-Flash.

Because BIOS flashing is potentially risky, please do it with caution. Inadequate BIOS flashing
may result in system malfunction.

If that's not successful, you should follow the instructions on page 29, to reset the CMOS. Requires turning off and unplugging your computer, then shorting out the Clr CMOS pins as instructed.

CLR_CMOS (Clearing CMOS Jumper)
Use this jumper to clear the CMOS values (e.g. date information and BIOS configurations) and reset the CMOS values to factory defaults. To clear the CMOS values, place a jumper cap on the two pins to temporarily short the two pins or use a metal object like a screwdriver to touch the two
pins for a few seconds.
• Always turn off your computer and unplug the power cord from the power outlet before clearing the CMOS values.
• After clearing the CMOS values and before turning on your computer, be sure to remove the jumper cap from the jumper. Failure to do so may cause damage to the motherboard.
• After system restart, go to BIOS Setup to load factory defaults (select Load Optimized Defaults) or manually configure the BIOS settings (refer to Chapter 2, "BIOS Setup," for BIOS configurations).

That should reset it back to the initial BIOS version, to at least get you going.


Hi there John.

Thanks for all the info you posted, but unfortunately my loopboot occurs before the BIOS can even load. The system will boot once, power down for a second, attempt to boot again, reset without the power down, attempt to boot yet again, power down - rinse and repeat.

I tried clearing the CMOS with the jumper, and taking the battery off to restore the factory BIOS, but it's not working. I guess i'll have to take it to my nearest dealer to check it and maybe even change the MB, it seems dead.

Thanks in advance.

Regards


I'm stuck in that loop, and the only way to stop it is to press the powerdown button for 20s.
m
0
l
June 7, 2012 7:48:17 AM

Ok. So i tried this. Attached the Jumper for clearing the CMOS and waited around 30 minutes. Unplugged all front-USB wires. Now it seems it went out of loop. But i still don't see anything on my screen (using VGA connector). And my power button won't work at all to shut down the computer (i have to shut it down the hard way switching the PSU off) even if i hold it pressed for 30s.

Regards and will keep up to date.
m
0
l
June 7, 2012 1:03:24 PM

Updating the topic. Seems that i unplugged a little bit the ATX_12V 4pin connector and that's why all the fans went to max power. Thought it might be handy to try another PSU just to be sure, but i don't have any around so i'll just send the tower to my local computer store and see what they can do.

Thanks a lot again.
m
0
l
!