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Power Surge Fried my ud3r??

Last response: in Motherboards
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August 1, 2010 1:20:01 PM

Hello everyone, I was on my laptop today and i was pulling the charger cable which was stuck under the chair , and suddenly i heard a "poof' and i noticed the laptop charger cable was stripped, and two wire from the laptop charger made contact, nothing happened to the laptop charger i used a new power cable for it, a few hours later i wanted to use the computer and it would turn on but not post, the computer power cable is plugged in to the same power strip as the laptop charger is, is there a chance that my , mobo is fried and if so, could any other hardware be damaged ...

Please help me, i don't have experience in this field and Im scared that my motherboard is fried !! :(  :( 

More about : power surge fried ud3r

August 1, 2010 3:29:41 PM

zarbo said:
... and suddenly i heard a "poof' and i noticed the laptop charger cable had two wires that made contact,

There are no wires that can make contact. Those 'wires' can only exist when you do not provide all facts. You are shorting your help of facts. Therefore any answer would be only wild speculation - useless.
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August 1, 2010 4:21:56 PM

alright i edited the post to a more defining way
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August 1, 2010 4:54:02 PM

zarbo said:
alright i edited the post to a more defining way

Which wire? One from AC receptacle to power supply? Or one from the power supply to computer? The latter is not replaceable. Requires special connectors. And has other requirements. If not met, the power supply may stop providing power to the computer.

Important are relevant details such as computer make and model, how you 'replaced' that cable, which wire shorted to what, how do you know the power supply is even working, and how does the laptop have a power supply different from its 'charger'?

Using no capitals or punctuation makes it all that harder to read. Those run-on sentences can be interpreted multiple ways.

A laptop only has one charger - one power supply. Why does yours have multiple connections to the same power strip?
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August 1, 2010 6:01:37 PM

Westom Thank you so much for directing me again, I am a new user, so i have no experience, i'll start again:

I have a desktop with the following features:

• Case: Thermaltake V9
• Psu: Thermaltake 650Watt
• HDDs: WD 1TB 64MB cache 10,000RPM, G.Skill 128GB SSD
• Mobo: Gigabyte-UD3R
• CPU: Intel i7 930 2.8GHz (OC > 3.6GHz)
• Memory: G.Skill 3 x 2GB 1300MHz
• GPU: ATI Radeon HD 4890
• Networking: ASUS Wireless PCI
• Cooling: Corsair H50 WaterCooler

And i have a laptop (G51JX-3D).


Today i was in bed with my laptop connected to the charger, the charger is 3 parts the Main part, the cable that is plugged to the power outlet(power strip in my case),and the cable the goes to the laptop. The cable that connects to the laptop has been twisted hards and therefore stripped, the wires made contact to each other and blew, i got another cable which plugs into the main charger part, and into the laptop and it works...

I have a power strip connected to the wall, and i plug the power cable for my computer into the power strip, also the laptop charger into this strip and the LCD screen power cable to the power strip.

A few hours later i tried to turn on my computer, the lights come on, but the motherboard wont post, LCD wont even show anything, so what i am concerned about is whether the power surge has caused this disfunction, the pc was working night, and today this happened, i haven't used the computer today until now, but i have opened the case and took out the wireless adapter card for a second and put it in (wanted to read the serial number of the wifi card) then i put it back in, after that i tried to turn on the computer.

I would be really grateful if you could direct me to what the solution could be..

Thank you so much again Westom.
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August 1, 2010 8:50:22 PM

zarbo said:
I have a desktop with the following features: ...
• Case: Thermaltake V9
• Psu: Thermaltake 650Watt
• HDDs: WD 1TB 64MB cache 10,000RPM, G.Skill 128GB SSD
• Mobo: Gigabyte-UD3R
• CPU: Intel i7 930 2.8GHz (OC > 3.6GHz)
• Memory: G.Skill 3 x 2GB 1300MHz
• GPU: ATI Radeon HD 4890
• Networking: ASUS Wireless PCI
• Cooling: Corsair H50 WaterCooler
And i have a laptop (G51JX-3D).

Oh. The computer is not the laptop. OK.

A cable from power supply (charger) to laptop is a low voltage wire. That DC voltage output by the supply would be listed on the supply. Maybe 18 volts?

A surge is a very high voltage. Shorting something never creates a surge. Shorting causes near zero voltage.

Now the laptop has two power sources. Battery or its AC power supply. If the power supply is shorted, the laptop should still work from battery.

Meanwhile, even a shorted power supply must not be damaged. That applies to the laptop power supply (charger) and the Thermaltake. And would never affect anything else via AC mains. No laptop DC voltage failure should be seen on AC mains or affect the desktop.

With the desktop, you have two choices. One is to keep replacing good parts until something works. Other is to first see the failure before removing, changing, replacing, or disconnecting anything. The desktops power supply and CPU are both controlled by a power controller. That and its related inputs can be defined in but a minute using a multimeter. A tool sold in most any store that sells hammers including Wal-Mart, Kmart, and Lowes. Typically costs less than a good hammer.

Using its 20 VDC settings, measure voltage on each wire that connects the supply to motherboard. Simply push the probe into a nylon connector and record voltage numbers.

For example, with the system off and connected to a wall receptacle, touch the purple wire. That should measure somewhere around 5 volts. Report that number in 3 digits.

Do same for the green and gray wires both before and as the power switch is pressed. Reporting these numbers and reactions means a suspect is quickly identified. And you learn how a computer actually works.

And finally, measure any one red, orange, and yellow wires as the power switch is pressed. Which of these try to rise? Which ones do not?

From those three digit numbers, the next reply will identify specific failed parts or eliminate almost all but a few suspects. That should explain why you have a failure and what needs to be replaced. A failure that has no relationship to laptop DC voltages.
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August 1, 2010 9:04:46 PM

thanks so much i will report back to you tomorrow, thanks champ
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August 2, 2010 3:54:54 AM

Hey westom, I have determined that the fault is either from the Mobo or the CPU, i tried another GPU on the mobo and it still didn't work, i tried different ram which are ddr3, i changed the PSU, and with no luck nothing is working, i couldn't test another CPU because i haven't got access to a 1366 Socket CPU spare, so it comes down to the mobo and cpu, and i dont think that it's from the cpu but from the mobo, just my though anyway, what do you think is the fault ??

Thanks in advanced man :) 
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August 2, 2010 3:57:19 AM

BTW, i found a an eBay auction on a GA-EX58-UD4P which is in my budget zone, do you think i should go for it or not just yet??
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August 3, 2010 2:07:32 AM

Bump
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Best solution

August 3, 2010 3:19:30 PM

zarbo said:
Hey westom, I have determined that the fault is either from the Mobo or the CPU, i tried another GPU on the mobo and it still didn't work, i tried different ram which are ddr3, i changed the PSU, and with no luck nothing is working, i couldn't test another CPU because i haven't got access to a 1366 Socket CPU spare,
Just keep replacing perfectly good parts until something works. A defective power supply can boot a computer. A perfectly good power supply can fail in an otherwise good computer. Nothing is known good or bad. You are shotgunning. That means replacing mnay parts until something works.

Listed was how to know something is good or bad. Currently, every part remains in an 'unknown' category. Shotgunning never moves a component from 'unknown' to 'definitively good' or 'definitively bad'. Shotgunning is replacing parts on wild speculation until something works. Buy replacements for perfectly good parts.

Nothing provided numbers. A first indication that nothing has been learned.

You were told how to have an answer. What responsible techs do was not done. Therefore you have discovered nothing, made assistance here useless, and everything remains 100% suspect.

How do you know if a power controller is good or bad. Everything will act defective if the power controller is defective or the power contoller has bad inputs from those other parts. You could have had a complete answer in the next reply. Instead you have chosen to work harder; confuse yourself. That is shotgunning. Even the video controller, PSU, and Ram are unknown; may be defective.

Again, because so many in you position just don't get this. A defective supply can boot a computer. And a perfectly good supply can be defective in an otherwise perfectly good computer. Shotgunning: keep replacing supplies until something works.
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August 3, 2010 4:14:40 PM

Best answer selected by zarbo.
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August 3, 2010 4:17:10 PM

thanks so much for a wonderful explanation, i am lucky that i am building a rig for one of my friends with almost all the same parts so it looks like i am gonna find out why it's not working.

Thanks for the help Westom, i definitely love this forum and will be participating more often
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August 3, 2010 5:49:52 PM

zarbo said:
thanks so much for a wonderful explanation, i am lucky that i am building a rig for one of my friends with almost all the same parts so it looks like i am gonna find out why it's not working.

If building a computer, then another reason why you bought that multimeter.

Again, a defective power supply may still boot a computer. Then the computer fails months later. Informed computer assemblers use the meter to make the same measurements (posted previous). To see the defect long before any warranty expires.

If not, the defect lingers until intermittent first cause much confusion. And then failure occurs long after the warranty has expired. Get the meter. Learn how to have a complete answer in the next reply.
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August 4, 2010 1:13:17 AM

ok thanks
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