Aventum Cryo-TEC (-15 C @ 4.6Ghz)

I was just browsing Digitalstorms' highest end systems, and took notice to a custom cooling system that uses thermo-electric cold plates to cool Intels hex-cores to below -15 C, at 4.6Ghz....

Has anyone here seen a cooler like this before? Well apart from the world-record attempts where they're using liquid helium; I mean on a practical day-to-day level. And if the theoretical max clock for a 3960x is 9Ghz, how high could you OC with this monster?
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  1. Its called peltier to the average overclocker :) you can make one too, but with all due respect, that thermo-electric-...cooler will yet need radiators to dissipate its heat and then it'll have to deal with the cpu's heat dump as well.
  2. Check out 4ryan6's sub-ambient build at the top of the forum...the last couple pages he introduced a TEC into his loop directly after CPU with a customized CPU waterblock.

    If you want other ideas, I can point you in those directions.
  3. I browsed through his thread.. very interesting setup. Cooling can be way more complex than I ever thought; what would the estimated price of a TEC setup with heatsinks & watercooling be? DS version is over 2k for the CPU loop alone.
  4. TEC pad is about $50, the power supply for it is $200, but that is not the only problem you need some type of insulation for the block and the lines if the water gets too cold like below 60 F, condensation may occur. The insulation will prevent this, dragon skin is a good way to stop or prevent condensation, and dragon skin is $100 to $200 depending on how much you need. I have 4 TEC pads but have not used them since the K7 series, haven’t had a need for them, but am considering adding them back to the setup on my next build, as the new systems today can be clocked so high.
  5. then there is the thermal gel you need to apply around cpu socket and the insulation material to contain the gel.

    @ OP - You could get the DS works, but if it were to break, you'd need to pay 2K just to get it fixed and shipping the entire case won't go for cheap mate :)
  6. Lutfij said:
    then there is the thermal gel you need to apply around cpu socket and the insulation material to contain the gel.

    @ OP - You could get the DS works, but if it were to break, you'd need to pay 2K just to get it fixed and shipping the entire case won't go for cheap mate :)


    I'm just researching (& daydreaming). I couldn't afford a rig like that; their highest end workstation is nearly double the price of the desktop (20k). I'm still looking for enough steady work to be able to save for a one.
  7. toolmaker_03 said:
    TEC pad is about $50, the power supply for it is $200, but that is not the only problem you need some type of insulation for the block and the lines if the water gets too cold like below 60 F, condensation may occur. The insulation will prevent this, dragon skin is a good way to stop or prevent condensation, and dragon skin is $100 to $200 depending on how much you need. I have 4 TEC pads but have not used them since the K7 series, haven’t had a need for them, but am considering adding them back to the setup on my next build, as the new systems today can be clocked so high.


    So around 500 to put together your own TEC setup? Is there a reason this company is charging 2k (and 4k for GPU loop)? -15C on 4.6Ghz seems like pretty ambitious cooling... sounds like a godsend for a high boost in CPU rendering.
  8. reason ? their badge. Just like an Hp desktop costs more and costs even more to get repaired. where a self built rig is more manageable down the isle of upgrades and stability.

    there are a lil more than $500, you could kill your rig if your not careful, but then again its just like an occupational hazard. You know of the risks before shooting down your sites :)

    * i wanted to go DS' below freezing temps but then realized you'll need to manage the heat dump from a peltier as there are two sides to a peltier unit. It has a hot side and a cold side - and this interchanges. If your hot side isn't cooled properly, you can risk burning the cpu. Thas what landed me tog o real watercooling sans the TEC tech.
  9. yes, Because if it is not done correctly the water condensation could damage the system so you’re paying for the guarantee.
  10. Lutfij said:

    * i wanted to go DS' below freezing temps but then realized you'll need to manage the heat dump from a peltier as there are two sides to a peltier unit. It has a hot side and a cold side - and this interchanges. If your hot side isn't cooled properly, you can risk burning the cpu. Thats what landed me tog o real water-cooling sans the TEC tech.


    Well I'd assume if you're paying 2-4k for custom cooling like that, they'd at-least cover it in their warranty --- as well as give you all the essential information for managing it properly. But if it's a more risky method than true liquid cooling, I suppose that's the chance taken for having sub-zero temps.
  11. might want to look out on cyber powers machines too, and there is also a subsection in the systems thread where people are worried of having to ship the case for repairs and they pop over to Tom's asking for a DIY approach to fix the issue instead of having to ship the entire case themselves.

    but my advice would be to read up all you can about the Peltier cooling and see its pro's and cons. We can help you, as Rubix said, go the right direction...but you'll need to choose and walk that direction - Like the Matrix :)

    DS are the only ones who can do this on mass market style, you'll need to do it on your own to do on your own to accomplish it if you'd want to skip DS and I'm sure by now you've realized knowledge regarding hardware+setup is far more expensive/valuable than having to pay someone else to do it for you.
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