Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is my Motherboard broken?

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
August 4, 2010 12:55:08 AM

Hey guys, I probably have done something very stupid which is overclock too much on a motherboard that might not be able to handle it. My specs are as followed:

GIGABYTE GA-G31M-ES2L rev. 2.0.
Intel Q6600
4 GB of G.SKILL DDR2-1066 RAM
XFX Radeon HD 4890
550w Fatal1ty OCZ PSU.
Antec 300, 5 case fans (4x120mm, 1x140mm, all at max RPM)
Coolermaster Hyper 212 Plus Heatsink
Windows 7 Ultimate x64

I tried overclocking the Q6600 from 2.4ghz to 3.4ghz, setting the FSB to 378 (the multiplier was 9x). I set the core voltage to 1.45v and left the PCI Express Frequency and System Memory Multipliers to auto because it wouldn't let me boot up into Windows otherwise. I got into Windows and tried to run Prime95 to check the stability, I chose the blend mode. It was running for 10 minutes, and then I heard some beeping coming from the computer, couldn't really hear it clearly with the fans. When I got close to the top case fan near the heatsink, I could smell some burning, smelled like burning plastic. I was about to turn off the computer when it just shut off by itself, and it wouldn't turn back on. HWMonitor says the hottest core when running never passed 68c when running Prime95 (Everest said it was 58c at the hottest, probably wrong).

I checked the inside of the case for the burning smell, nothing. No visible damage on the motherboard, tried all the other components in another computer, and they worked. Have I broken my motherboard?

More about : motherboard broken

a c 103 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
August 4, 2010 1:56:09 AM

Overclocking + burning smell +auto shut down = me cringing. That certainly sounds bad, but then again, by design, CPU's will shut down when they get too hot. Also, if you did overheat it, they do need some time to cool down before becoming operable again.

Now, let's discuss your OC methology. Did you lower your NB frequency? You might want to double check on how fast your NB was running, as that can easily increase heat and decrease stability.

North Bridge (NB) isn't always adjustable by the actual multiplier, rather you may need to adjust the frequency itself to brind down the speed. To determine your NB frequency, use the forumla NB multi x FSB.

If your CPU speed at stock is 2400MHz, then I'm guessing that the multiplier at stock is 12. With the above formula, your stock NB frequency would likely be 2000MHz (10x200MHz). You want to keep your NB frequency as close as possible to the stock value.

So now let's take your FSB (378) and incorporate it into the equation (NB multi x FSB = NB Frequency[NBF]). Assuming your NB frequency at stock is 2000MHz, then reducing the multiplier to 5 will result with the NBF being 1890 (5x378=1890); reducing the NB multiplier to 6 will result with the NBF being 2268 (6x378=2268).

a c 234 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
August 4, 2010 2:04:10 AM

Well... by process of elimination, you have determined your MOBO is fried (Granted you test your RAM, PSU, CPU... etc in another PC).

I had very similar issue but I wasn't so lucky... I lost the PSU, CPU and Motherboard when I pushed the voltage up to try and get stable. Luckly... all was replaced except the CPU, since it came from an OEM PC :) 
Related resources
August 4, 2010 2:24:44 AM

T_T said:
Overclocking + burning smell +auto shut down = me cringing. That certainly sounds bad, but then again, by design, CPU's will shut down when they get too hot. Also, if you did overheat it, they do need some time to cool down before becoming operable again.

Now, let's discuss your OC methology. Did you lower your NB frequency? You might want to double check on how fast your NB was running, as that can easily increase heat and decrease stability.

North Bridge (NB) isn't always adjustable by the actual multiplier, rather you may need to adjust the frequency itself to brind down the speed. To determine your NB frequency, use the forumla NB multi x FSB.

If your CPU speed at stock is 2400MHz, then I'm guessing that the multiplier at stock is 12. With the above formula, your stock NB frequency would likely be 2000MHz (10x200MHz). You want to keep your NB frequency as close as possible to the stock value.

So now let's take your FSB (378) and incorporate it into the equation (NB multi x FSB = NB Frequency[NBF]). Assuming your NB frequency at stock is 2000MHz, then reducing the multiplier to 5 will result with the NBF being 1890 (5x378=1890); reducing the NB multiplier to 6 will result with the NBF being 2268 (6x378=2268).

No, I didn't take the NB frequency into account. I also don't recall seeing the NB multiplier in the bios. Also, I tried to turn on the computer again, and the fans started for a second, and then turned off.
August 4, 2010 2:09:10 PM

So if this one is broken, what is a good overclocking mATX LGA775 motherboard?
!