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Possible bad CPU?

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March 15, 2010 4:39:13 AM

My aunt just had her HP computer crash and she went to Bestbuy and they said it was a bad MoBo and to get new one. What would happen was when you turned on the pc, the bios would beep one long beep and never stop. . So, I ripped out every hardware component to the point of where I had the mobo sitting on my table with the power supply plugged into it, the CPU and its fan. Now I would get one beep then the long one again. The short beep was clearly the ram so I put one stick in and it would do the long beep only again. I took out the CPU, cleaned off the paste using 100% pure ethanol. put some new paste on and it beeped again. I took put the CPU and turned it on and it did not beep at all. So I took out the ram and turned it on and it stilled did not beep. So not knowing to much about computers, would a computer beep bios messages without a CPU? And do you think it could be the cause of the issue??? The board it self has phoenix bios, and has no visible signs of damage. Capacitors, burn marks ect...

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Anonymous
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March 15, 2010 11:10:16 AM

Have you tried clearing the Cmos, but must say, does sound like the Mobo to me, unfortunately!
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March 16, 2010 7:20:26 AM

The funny thing is that there was no cmos battery in the computer when I got it. So I put one in from another computer. Not 100% of it was even still good the one I put in... Well its always good for parts I guess. :??: 
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March 16, 2010 8:27:47 AM

Phoenix BIOS ERROR BEEP CODES

Phoenix BIOS beep codes are a series of beeps separated by a pause, for example:
beep --- beep beep --- beep --- beep beep would be 1-2-1-2
1-1-4-1 - Cache Error (level 2)
1-2-2-3 - BIOS ROM Checksum
1-3-1-1 - DRAM Refresh Test
1-3-1-3 - Keyboard controller test
1-3-4-1 - RAM Failure on address line xxxx (check memory)
1-3-4-3 - RAM Failure on data bits xxxx of low byte of memory bus
1-4-1-1 - RAM Failure on data bits xxxx of high byte of memory bus
2-1-2-3 - ROM copyright notice
2-2-3-1 - Test for unexpected interrupts


Phoenix ISA/MCA/EISA BIOS Beep Codes:

The beep codes are represented in the number of beeps. E.g. 1-1-2 would mean 1 beep, a pause, 1 beep, a pause, and 2 beeps.

With a Dell computer, a 1-2 beep code can also indicate that a bootable add-in card is installed but no boot device is attached. For example, in you insert a Promise Ultra-66 card but do not connect a hard drive to it, you will get the beep code. I verified this with a SIIG (crap -- avoid like the plague) Ultra-66 card, and then confirmed the results with Dell. Submitted by John Palmer.
Beeps
Error Message
Description

1-1-2 CPU test failure The CPU is faulty. Replace the CPU
Low 1-1-2 System board select failure The motherboard is having an undetermined fault. Replace the motherboard
1-1-3 CMOS read/write error The real time clock/CMOS is faulty. Replace the CMOS if possible
Low 1-1-3 Extended CMOS RAM failure The extended portion of the CMOS RAM has failed. Replace the CMOS if possible
1-1-4 BIOS ROM checksum error The BIOS ROM has failed. Replace the BIOS or upgrade if possible
1-2-1 PIT failure The programmable interrupt timer has failed. Replace if possible
1-2-2 DMA failure The DMA controller has failed. Replace the IC if possible
1-2-3 DMA read/write failure The DMA controller has failed. Replace the IC if possible
1-3-1 RAM refresh failure The RAM refresh controller has failed
1-3-2 64KB RAM failure The test of the first 64KB RAM has failed to start
1-3-3 First 64KB RAM failure The first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
1-3-4 First 64KB logic failure The first RAM control logic has failed
1-4-1 Address line failure The address line to the first 64KB RAM has failed
1-4-2 Parity RAM failure The first RAM IC has failed. Replace if possible
1-4-3 EISA fail-safe timer test Replace the motherboard
1-4-4 EISA NMI port 462 test Replace the motherboard
2-1-1 64KB RAM failure Bit 0; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-1-2 64KB RAM failure Bit 1; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-1-3 64KB RAM failure Bit 2; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-1-4 64KB RAM failure Bit 3; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-2-1 64KB RAM failure Bit 4; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-2-2 64KB RAM failure Bit 5; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-2-3 64KB RAM failure Bit 6; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-2-4 64KB RAM failure Bit 7; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-3-1 64KB RAM failure Bit 8; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-3-2 64KB RAM failure Bit 9; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-3-3 64KB RAM failure Bit 10; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-3-4 64KB RAM failure Bit 11; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-4-1 64KB RAM failure Bit 12; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-4-2 64KB RAM failure Bit 13; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-4-3 64KB RAM failure Bit 14; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
2-4-4 64KB RAM failure Bit 15; This data bit on the first RAM IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
3-1-1 Slave DMA register failure The DMA controller has failed. Replace the controller if possible
3-1-2 Master DMA register failure The DMA controller had failed. Replace the controller if possible
3-1-3 Master interrupt mask register failure The interrupt controller IC has failed
3-1-4 Slave interrupt mask register failure The interrupt controller IC has failed
3-2-2 Interrupt vector error The BIOS was unable to load the interrupt vectors into memory. Replace the motherboard
3-2-3 Reserved
3-2-4 Keyboard controller failure The keyboard controller has failed. Replace the IC if possible
3-3-1 CMOS RAM power bad Replace the CMOS battery or CMOS RAM if possible
3-3-2 CMOS configuration error The CMOS configuration has failed. Restore the configuration or replace the battery if possible
3-3-3 Reserved
3-3-4 Video memory failure There is a problem with the video memory. Replace the video adapter if possible
3-4-1 Video initialization failure There is a problem with the video adapter. Reseat the adapter or replace the adapter if possible
4-2-1 Timer failure The system's timer IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
4-2-2 Shutdown failure The CMOS has failed. Replace the CMOS IC if possible
4-2-3 Gate A20 failure The keyboard controller has failed. Replace the IC if possible
4-2-4 Unexpected interrupt in protected mode This is a CPU problem. Replace the CPU and retest
4-3-1 RAM test failure System RAM addressing circuitry is faulty. Replace the motherboard
4-3-3 Interval timer channel 2 failure The system timer IC has failed. Replace the IC if possible
4-3-4 Time of day clock failure The real time clock/CMOS has failed. Replace the CMOS if possible
4-4-1 Serial port failure A error has occurred in the serial port circuitry
4-4-2 Parallel port failure A error has occurred in the parallel port circuitry
4-4-3 Math coprocessor failure The math coprocessor has failed. If possible, replace the MPU

Beeps
Description

1-1-1-3 Verify real mode
1-1-2-1 Get CPU type
1-1-2-3 Initialize system hardware
1-1-3-1 Initialize chipset registers with initial values
1-1-3-2 Set in POST flag
1-1-3-3 Initialize CPU registers
1-1-4-1 Initialize cache to initial values
1-1-4-3 Initialize I/O
1-2-1-1 Initialize power management
1-2-1-2 Load alternative registers with initial POST values
1-2-1-3 Jump to UserPatch0
1-2-2-1 Initialize timer initialization
1-2-3-1 8254 timer initialization
1-2-3-3 8237 DMA controller initialization
1-2-4-1 Reset Programmable Interrupt Controller
1-3-1-1 Test DRAM refresh
1-3-1-3 Test 8742 Keyboard Controller
1-3-2-1 Set ES segment register to 4GB
1-3-3-1 Autosize DRAM
1-3-3-3 Clear 512K base memory
1-3-4-1 Test 512K base address lines
1-3-4-3 Test 51K base memory
1-4-1-3 Test CPU bus-clock frequency
1-4-2-1 CMOS RAM read/write failure (this commonly indicates a problem on the ISA bus such as a card not seated)
1-4-2-4 Reinitialize the chipset
1-4-3-1 Shadow system BIOS ROM
1-4-3-2 Reinitialize the cache
1-4-3-3 Autosize the cache
1-4-4-1 Configure advanced chipset registers
1-4-4-2 Load alternate registers with CMOS values
2-1-1-1 Set initial CPU speed
2-1-1-3 Initialize interrupt vectors
2-1-2-1 Initialize BIOS interrupts
2-1-2-3 Check ROM copyright notice
2-1-2-4 Initialize manager for PCI Options ROMs
2-1-3-1 Check video configuration against CMOS
2-1-3-2 Initialize PCI bus and devices
2-1-3-3 initialize all video adapters in system
2-1-4-1 Shadow video BIOS ROM
2-1-4-3 Display copyright notice
2-2-1-1 Display CPU type and speed
2-2-1-3 Test keyboard
2-2-2-1 Set key click if enabled
2-2-2-3 Enable keyboard
2-2-3-1 Test for unexpected interrupts
2-2-3-3 Display prompt "Press F2 to enter setup"
2-2-4-1 Test RAM between 512K and 640K
2-3-1-1 Test expanded memory
2-3-1-3 Test extended memory address lines
2-3-2-1 Jump to UserPatch1
2-3-2-3 Enable external and CPU caches
2-3-2-3 Configure advanced cache registers
2-3-3-1 Enable external and CPU caches
2-3-3-2 Initialize SMI handler
2-3-3-3 Display external cache size
2-3-4-1 Display shadow message
2-3-4-3 Display non-disposable segments
2-4-1-1 Display error messages
2-4-1-3 Check for configuration errors
2-4-2-1 Test real-time clock
2-4-2-3 Check for keyboard errors
2-4-4-1 Setup hardware interrupt vectors
2-4-4-3 Test coprocessor if present
3-1-1-1 Disable onboard I/O ports
3-1-1-3 Detect and install external RS232 ports
3-1-2-1 Detect and install external parallel ports
3-1-2-3 Reinitialize onboard I/O ports
3-1-3-1 Initialize BIOS Data Area
3-1-3-3 Initialize Extended BIOS Data Area
3-1-4-1 Initialize floppy controller
3-2-1-1 Initialize hard disk controller
3-2-1-2 Initialize local bus hard disk controller
3-2-1-3 Jump to UserPatch2
3-2-2-1 Disable A20 address line
3-2-2-3 Clear huge ES segment register
3-2-3-1 Search for option ROMs
3-2-3-3 Shadow option ROMs
3-2-4-1 Setup power management
3-2-4-3 Enable hardware interrupts
3-3-1-1 Set time of day
3-3-1-3 Check key lock
3-3-3-1 Erase F2 prompt
3-3-3-3 Scan for F2 keystroke
3-3-4-1 Enter SETUP
3-3-4-3 Clear in-POST flag
3-4-1-1 Check for errors
3-4-1-3 POST done - prepare to boot operating system
3-4-2-1 One beep
3-4-2-3 Check password (optional)
3-4-3-1 Clear global descriptor table
3-4-4-1 Clear parity checkers
3-4-4-3 Check virus and backup reminders
4-1-1-1 Try to boot with INT 19
4-2-1-1 Interrupt handler error
4-2-1-3 Unknown interrupt error
4-2-2-1 Pending interrupt error
4-2-2-3 Initialize option ROM error
4-2-3-1 Shutdown error
4-2-3-3 Extended Block Move
4-2-4-1 Shutdown 10 error
4-2-4-3 Keyboard Controller failure (most likely problem is with RAM or cache unless no video is present)
4-3-1-3 Initialize the chipset
4-3-1-4 Initialize refresh counter
4-3-2-1 Check for Forced Flash
4-3-2-2 BIOS ROM is OK
4-3-2-4 Do a complete RAM test
4-3-3-1 Do OEM initialization
4-3-3-2 Initialize interrupt controller
4-3-3-3 Read in bootstrap code
4-3-3-4 Initialize all vectors
4-3-4-2 Initialize the boot device
4-3-4-3 Boot code was read OK

Standard Original IBM POST Error Codes
1 short beep
Normal POST - system is ok
2 short beeps POST Error - error code shown on screen
No beep Power supply or system board problem
Continuous beep Power supply, system board, or keyboard problem
Repeating short beeps Power supply or system board problem
1 long, 1 short beep System board problem
1 long, 2 short beeps Display adapter problem (MDA, CGA)
1 long, 3 short beeps Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA)
3 long beeps 3270 keyboard card



IBM POST Diagnostic Code Descriptions


100 - 199
System Board
200 - 299 Memory
300 - 399 Keyboard
400 - 499 Monochrome Display
500 - 599 Color/Graphics Display
600 - 699 Floppy-disk drive and/or Adapter
700 - 799 Math Coprocessor
900 - 999 Parallel Printer Port
1000 - 1099 Alternate Printer Adapter
1100 - 1299 Asynchronous Communication Device, Adapter, or Port
1300 - 1399 Game Port
1400 - 1499 Color/Graphics Printer
1500 - 1599 Synchronous Communication Device, Adapter, or Port
1700 - 1799 Hard Drive and/or Adapter
1800 - 1899 Expansion Unit (XT)
2000 - 2199 Bisynchronous Communication Adapter
2400 - 2599 EGA system-board Video (MCA)
3000 - 3199 LAN Adapter
4800 - 4999 Internal Modem
7000 - 7099 Phoenix BIOS Chips
7300 - 7399 3.5" Disk Drive
8900 - 8999 MIDI Adapter
11200 - 11299 SCSI Adapter
21000 - 21099 SCSI Fixed Disk and Controller
21500 - 21599 SCSI CD-ROM System





AMI BIOS Beep Codes



1 Short Beep One beep is good! Everything is ok, that is if you see things on the screen. If you don't see anything, check your monitor and video card first. Is everything connected? If they seem fine, your motherboard has some bad chips on it. First reset the SIMM's and reboot. If it does the same thing, one of the memory chips on the motherboard are bad, and you most likely need to get another motherboard since these chips are soldered on.
2 Short Beeps Your computer has memory problems. First check video. If video is working, you'll see an error message. If not, you have a parity error in your first 64K of memory. First check your SIMM's. Reseat them and reboot. If this doesn't do it, the memory chips may be bad. You can try switching the first and second banks memory chips. First banks are the memory banks that your CPU finds its first 64K of base memory in. You'll need to consult your manual to see which bank is first. If all your memory tests good, you probably need to buy another motherboard.
3 Short Beeps Basically the same thing as 2 beeps. Follow that diagnosis above.
4 Short Beeps Basically the same thing as 2 beeps. Follow that diagnosis above. It could also be a bad timer
5 Short Beeps Your motherboard is complaining. Try reseating the memory and rebooting. If that doesn't help, you should consider another motherboard. You could probably get away with just replacing the CPU, but that's not too cost-effective. Its just time to upgrade!
6 Short Beeps The chip on your motherboard that controls your keyboard (A20 gate) isn't working. First try another keyboard. If it doesn't help, reseat the chip that controls the keyboard, if it isn't soldered in. If it still beeps, replace the chip if possible. Replace the motherboard if it is soldered in.
7 Short Beeps Your CPU broke overnight. Its no good. Either replace the CPU, or buy another motherboard.
8 Short Beeps Your video card isn't working. Make sure it is seated well in the bus. If it still beeps, either the whole card is bad or the memory on it is. Best bet is to install another video card.
9 Short Beeps Your BIOS is bad. Reseat or Replace the BIOS.
10 Short Beeps Your problem lies deep inside the CMOS. All chips associated with the CMOS will likely have to be replaced. Your best bet is to get a new motherboard.
11 Short Beeps Your problem is in the Cache Memory chips on the motherboard. Reseat or Replace these chips.
1 Long, 3 Short Beeps You've probably just added memory to the motherboard since this is a conventional or extended memory failure. Generally this is caused by a memory chip that is not seated properly. Reseat the memory chips.
1 Long, 8 Short Beeps Display / retrace test failed. Reseat the video card.






Phoenix BIOS Beep Codes

These audio codes are a little more detailed then the AMI codes. This BIOS emits three sets of beeps. For example, 1 -pause- 3 -pause 3 -pause. This is a 1-3-3 combo and each set of beeps is separated by a brief pause. Listen to this sequence of sounds, count them, and reboot and count again if you have to.



1-1-3 Your computer can't read the configuration info stored in the CMOS. Replace the motherboard.
1-1-4 Your BIOS needs to be replaced.
1-2-1 You have a bad timer chip on the motherboard. You need a new motherboard.
1-2-2 The motherboard is bad.
1-2-3 The motherboard is bad.
1-3-1 You'll need to replace the motherboard.
1-3-3 You'll need to replace the motherboard.
1-3-4 The motherboard is bad.
1-4-1 The motherboard is bad.
1-4-2 Some of your memory is bad.
2-_-_ Any combo of beeps after two means that some of your memory is bad, and unless you want to get real technical, you should probably have the guys in the lab coats test the memory for you. Take it to the shop.
3-1-_ One of the chips on your motherboard is broken. You'll likely need to get another board.
3-2-4 One of the chips on your motherboard that checks the keyboard is broken. You'll likely need to get another board.
3-3-4 Your computer can't find the video card. Is it there? If so, try swapping it with another one and see if it works.
3-4-_ Your video card isn't working. You'll need to replace it.
4-2-1 There's a bad chip on the motherboard. You need to buy another board.
4-2-2 First check the keyboard for problems. If nothing, you have a bad motherboard.
4-2-3 Same as 4-2-2.
4-2-4 One of the cards is bad. Try yanking out the cards one by one to isolate the culprit. Replace the bad one. The last possibility is to buy another motherboard.
4-3-1 Replace the motherboard.
4-3-2 See 4-3-1
4-3-3 See 4-3-1
4-3-4 Time of day clock failure. Try running the setup program that comes with the computer. Check the date and time. If that doesn't work, replace the battery. If that doesn't work, replace the power supply. You may have to replace the motherboard, but that is rare.
4-4-1 Your serial ports are acting up. Reseat, or replace, the I/O card. If the I/O is on the motherboard itself, disable them with a jumper (consult your manual to know which one) and then add an I/O card.
4-4-2 See 4-4-1, but this time is your Parallel port that's acting up.
4-4-3 You math coprocessor is having problems. Run a test program to double-check it. If it is indeed bad, disable it, or replace it.
Low 1-1-2 Your motherboard is having problems
Low 1-1-3 This is an Extended CMOS RAM problem, check your motherboard battery, and motherboard.



Enjoy :) 
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February 15, 2012 10:36:49 AM

fodelement said:
My aunt just had her HP computer crash and she went to Bestbuy and they said it was a bad MoBo and to get new one. What would happen was when you turned on the pc, the bios would beep one long beep and never stop. . So, I ripped out every hardware component to the point of where I had the mobo sitting on my table with the power supply plugged into it, the CPU and its fan. Now I would get one beep then the long one again. The short beep was clearly the ram so I put one stick in and it would do the long beep only again. I took out the CPU, cleaned off the paste using 100% pure ethanol. put some new paste on and it beeped again. I took put the CPU and turned it on and it did not beep at all. So I took out the ram and turned it on and it stilled did not beep. So not knowing to much about computers, would a computer beep bios messages without a CPU? And do you think it could be the cause of the issue??? The board it self has phoenix bios, and has no visible signs of damage. Capacitors, burn marks ect...




Clear CMOS some MOBO had jumpers to do it, If you have a spare memory DIMMs try it also. Go to BIOS and set to "load optimized defalts" save and exit.
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February 15, 2012 1:37:50 PM

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