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Limit Bandwidth

Last response: in Networking
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December 23, 2009 9:38:08 AM

Hello and greeting to all of you people,

I have a few question regarding network. I have 3 computers sharing the internet via hub that is connecting to the router/modem. how can i limit the bandwidth of the 3rd computer?



Or is it better to just get 1 more PCI LAN card, and connect my main computer to the internet directly, then connect the main computer to the hub with the other 2? Then just configure the other 2 to connect to the net thru the main. By this, can i have any measure of bandwidth limiter to those 2?

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December 23, 2009 1:03:24 PM

Limiting bandwidth is one of those things. High end switches normally do this. Some routers have QOS, but it's limited. DD-WRT may offer advance settings for a router via firmware. I do know there is software that will limit bandwidth, but it's installed on the computer you want to slow down normally.

http://www.raymond.cc/blog/archives/2008/02/22/restrict...

Traffic Shaper link on that page.
December 23, 2009 9:14:52 PM

Thanks for the reply.

I'd take a look at those traffic shaper, while it's good, from what i've read it didn't auto-start whenever the computer/windows is starting, you have to run it manually on the computer to get it to work.

On one point though, is there anyway i can edit the registry so that i can set how much bandwidth the computer can use?
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December 23, 2009 10:22:17 PM

You can set anything to startup by dropping a link in the startup folder on the start menu.

To my knowledge throttling internet bandwidth is done in the memory.

QoS in windows Registry applies to Network bandwidth to my knowledge. This in no way is going to help throttle internet bandwidth.
December 29, 2009 10:59:41 PM

I've tried to get QoS to work several times. One time I was hand-configuring a FreeBSD box to use IPFW (or PF, I forget) for QoS traffic shaping. Another time I used a home modem/router which promised QoS features.

I've never got traffic shaping to work, and it seems that QoS cannot stop one hungry machine snaffling all of the bandwidth, even if you limit how many ACK packets are returned per second / minute.
December 30, 2009 2:47:33 PM

My cousin setup a Linux packet shaper box. He could peg the internet with bit torrent and still get 30ms pings in games.

He could also limit how how much bandwidth ALL the bittorrent clients could use.

So, even if you have a 20mbit internet connection, you could set it so *at most* bit torrent would use is 10mbit or what have you.

Or you could say bit torrent can use all the free bandwidth, but if bandwidth becomes scares, then it settles down to 5mbit.
December 31, 2009 12:51:56 AM

This is one of those desires that is advanced anyway you want to approach it. if you use a traffic shaper then your gna have to put it on all the boxes and manually set how much bandwith it can use. or you can use a traffic shaper at the forefront of your network and set the bandwidth allocation rules. this can be done with linux, or a high end switch. another piece of advice. get rid of your hub. if your're concerned about network performance then the first thing you should of done was buy a switch, even a low end cheapy switch. hubs are crap for most situations today
January 2, 2010 1:27:30 PM

morviuz said:
Thanks for the reply.

I'd take a look at those traffic shaper, while it's good, from what i've read it didn't auto-start whenever the computer/windows is starting, you have to run it manually on the computer to get it to work.

On one point though, is there anyway i can edit the registry so that i can set how much bandwidth the computer can use?

Why not replace the hub with a router and use QoS to limit the incoming rate on their ports to whatever you need/want? I have a Linksys router and I can limit ports to 256K if need be.
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