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What temperature do power supplies operate at?

Last response: in Components
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March 16, 2010 5:55:56 AM

I have a strange urge to monitor the temperature on the power supply.

1 reason is that if the fan fails, and the fan controller fails to alert me, it will alert me via the temperature - and also I would like to know if having it silent and hotter is bad for the power supply (I want to make it last as long as possible)

Currently I placed a temperature sensor in one of the grills and it's 96F (been running all day)

Currently have an antec tri-cool @ 900 R'sPM and silent in the power supply.

Also, is 100F hot enough to melt the plastic around the temperature sensor? I want to route it through the back of the PSU instead of leaving it hanging out the side like it is now.
March 16, 2010 6:25:13 AM

You need not worry about temperature - Try purchasing a PSU with a certification (like 80 PLUS SILVER) - it means the PSU meets 80+ certification standard for up to 90% energy efficient, reducing wasted energy and lowering the amount of excess heat generated. Most PSU have circuits that when it heats up too high it shuts down to protect it from further damage.
March 16, 2010 6:29:24 AM

dEAne said:
You need not worry about temperature - Try purchasing a PSU with a certification (like 80 PLUS SILVER) - it means the PSU meets 80+ certification standard for up to 90% energy efficient, reducing wasted energy and lowering the amount of excess heat generated. Most PSU have circuits that when it heats up too high it shuts down to protect it from further damage.

Yeah this psu has "thermal overload protection" but it's only 70% efficient.

I was thinking of getting a replacement graphics card, but now I'm thinking I should get a more eco friendly (energy efficient) power supply.

Where can I get one of those "80 plus silver" power supplies and what names or slangs/terms should I look for?

I am pretty much limited to frys electronics and craigslist.

Would you recommend buying used? I can get a warranty from frys if I buy new.

Also, any idea what power my computer might need?

x2 64 3800+

2x1gb pc 6400

2 hard drives

5 120mm fans all on 3.3v

old cd and DVD readers but will get a dual layer burner.

Assuming I will get a video card as well.
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a c 248 ) Power supply
March 16, 2010 11:52:44 AM

^5 +1 what zipzoomflyhigh said.

Just out of curiosity what is the brand and model of your power supply?
a c 144 ) Power supply
March 16, 2010 2:27:57 PM

Depends. Most PSU's are rated for full output at 25 C. A few more are rated for full output at 40 C. Most of the really good ones are rated at 50 C.

50 C is a pretty difficult standard to meet.

Plus, better efficiency results in less wasted power and a cooler running power supply.
March 16, 2010 6:23:11 PM

It's running at 32C right now.

The power supply is an ultra 500 watt.

I'm unsure of any specifics on it.

I found 2 or 3 on craigslist with the 80 plus but the people selling had no idea about it and were unable to tell me if it was bronze or silver.

One guy even sent me a picture of his new power supply thinking it would be the same.

"
I see no indication on the outside of the box whether the supply is bronze or silver. It is whatever they shipped in the chassis at the time of manufacture. I took a photo for you of the power supply label from another NSK6580 that I am using (not the one for sale), and they should be the same supply type.They were both purchased at the same time. Perhaps you can determine which type the supply is from the photo."

Ok reading that now, maybe it's not as bad as it sounded.

Here is the picture.

March 16, 2010 6:28:32 PM

Can't edit, so here is the power supply

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1804...*F%3F&GUID=2c2f09cd1270a0e202050b25ffc09bde&itemid=180461766217&ff4=263602_263622

Ultra v-series

70% efficient

#
Support AMD and Intel Motherboards
#
Low Acoustic Noise
# 120mm Fan
#
Meets ATX Version 2.03 and ATX 12V Version 1.2 Specifications
#
Short Circuit Protection
#
In-Rush Current protection
#
Thermal Overload Cutoff Protection
#
MTBF > 100,000 Hours at Full Load, 110VAC and 25 Degree C Ambient Conditions
# Dedicated Circuitry - Low Noise Operation
#
FCC and UL Recognized

Wondering how much more the energy bill will typically cost if I keep using this instead of getting an 80 or 90% efficient power supply
!