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Noob seeking Small help e2160 oc

Last response: in Overclocking
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August 13, 2012 7:39:26 AM

CPU Intel e2160

mobo Gigabyte GA-G41MT-S2

ram Corsair DDR3 4 GB DDR3-1333/PC3-10600

hdd wd blue 500gb

nothing extra added.

usage - normal day to day surfing, checking emails/fb/news. watching movies or listening music once a week.

earlier mobo Intel945gcp being shorted by 9 month old kid splitting tea on cabinet.

now buying a DDR3+ga41 costs rs 3800 whereas fixing old mobo isn't possible as DDR1 mobo aren't available.

I have had searched a lot before going with above configuration decision which is less expensive in compare to i3 upgrade. also since I don't have PC I couldn't do intensive search here for which I deeply apologies.

my simple question is how to overclock to say 2.4 ghz from 1.8 ghz of current e2160. can it be done by BIOS setting? if yes, what is to be done in bios setting? what all figures and setting are to be changed and saved. finally will my PC able to digest 2.4 ghz easily for very nominal usage?

thanks in advance.
August 20, 2012 8:59:33 AM

Before we go to overclocking, I explain you how clock speed formed:
Clock Base (or FSB clock) x Multiplier = Clock Speed

Example:
Pentium Dual-Core E2160 has 9x multiplier and it using 200 MHz FSB speed.
200 MHz x 9 = 1.8 GHz

If you want overclock your E2160, just change the FSB speed. If you try to oc your CPU to 2.4 GHz, try divide the clock speed with multiplier to counting FSB speed.
Example:
Clock Speed (MHz) : Multiplier = FSB Speed.

After you divide them, set the FSB speed from result of division. Then, enjoy the overclocked clock speed!

BTW, you should set voltage for CPU for stability. But I can't explain about overvoltage because I'm hesitate to overvoltage my CPU.

More explanation was here's:
http://hexus.net/tech/tech-explained/cpu/9808-intel-cor...
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a c 197 K Overclocking
August 21, 2012 9:13:24 PM

This should be your first stop.
Core2 Overclocking Guide (generic guide based on an Asus motherboard)
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/259899-11-core-over...

Shadow's Gigabyte motherboard OC guide:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-245679_11_0.ht...
It's for an EP35-DS3L but all the Gigabyte Core2 BIOS's are similar. The G41 will just have fewer settings.

Go through the guides. Then take your core voltage off Auto and set your memory voltage to factory recommended values or no more than 1.600 volts. Change the System Memory Multiplier (DDR3 RAM) from AUTO to 4.00A. Then when you increase the FSB, the memory clock will rise in in proportion with it. At an FSB of 200 MHz, your memory clock should be at 800 MHz.

There are 5 main things that can limit your overclock:

1. Your motherboard. The G41 chipset is an economy chipset with a limited FSB (compared to the P35 and P45), generally around 340 - 370 MHz.

2. Memory. Native speed of your memory is 333 MHz (1333 MHz memory clock).
If everything else will run at 333 MHz, your system will be running at 3.0 GHz.

3. CPU limits. Nothing you can do about this. Once you reach the limits of your CPU, you are done. I will say that a 50% overclock is not unusual for the Allendales.

4. CPU voltage. Do not exceed 1.50 volts. That is Intel's max suggested CPU voltage.

5. Core temps. Core temps should be tested at maximum CPU load. A better cooler = lower temps. A higher cpu voltage (needed for better stability) = higher temps. So you see the trade off. Some cases have better airflow through them which will give you lower temperatures. Intel recommends a 70 C limit (well, OK - 73.3 C). For the Allendale CPU's, I recommend 65 C or lower. If you are using the stock cooler, that will be your overall limiting factor. And you will need to watch your load temps pretty carefully as you work out your OC settings.

A C2D chip (like the E2160) is easier to overclock than a quad core system. Two cores generate less heat than 4 cores in the same package. I have two Core2 quad systems - a Q9550 and a Q6600. I reached CPU limits before I reached either voltage or thermal limits.
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August 22, 2012 2:15:13 PM

jsc said:
This should be your first stop.
Core2 Overclocking Guide (generic guide based on an Asus motherboard)
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/259899-11-core-over...

Shadow's Gigabyte motherboard OC guide:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-245679_11_0.ht...
It's for an EP35-DS3L but all the Gigabyte Core2 BIOS's are similar. The G41 will just have fewer settings.

Go through the guides. Then take your core voltage off Auto and set your memory voltage to factory recommended values or no more than 1.600 volts. Change the System Memory Multiplier (DDR3 RAM) from AUTO to 4.00A. Then when you increase the FSB, the memory clock will rise in in proportion with it. At an FSB of 200 MHz, your memory clock should be at 800 MHz.

There are 5 main things that can limit your overclock:

1. Your motherboard. The G41 chipset is an economy chipset with a limited FSB (compared to the P35 and P45), generally around 340 - 370 MHz.

2. Memory. Native speed of your memory is 333 MHz (1333 MHz memory clock).
If everything else will run at 333 MHz, your system will be running at 3.0 GHz.

3. CPU limits. Nothing you can do about this. Once you reach the limits of your CPU, you are done. I will say that a 50% overclock is not unusual for the Allendales.

4. CPU voltage. Do not exceed 1.50 volts. That is Intel's max suggested CPU voltage.

5. Core temps. Core temps should be tested at maximum CPU load. A better cooler = lower temps. A higher cpu voltage (needed for better stability) = higher temps. So you see the trade off. Some cases have better airflow through them which will give you lower temperatures. Intel recommends a 70 C limit (well, OK - 73.3 C). For the Allendale CPU's, I recommend 65 C or lower. If you are using the stock cooler, that will be your overall limiting factor. And you will need to watch your load temps pretty carefully as you work out your OC settings.

A C2D chip (like the E2160) is easier to overclock than a quad core system. Two cores generate less heat than 4 cores in the same package. I have two Core2 quad systems - a Q9550 and a Q6600. I reached CPU limits before I reached either voltage or thermal limits.

I agree with your opinion
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