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I have no idea how to overclock... i5 3570K

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August 14, 2012 2:22:48 AM

I don't plan to overclock my GPU at this time, but I would like to overclock my CPU.

Hardware

i5 3570K
ASRock Z77 Extreme4 Motherboard
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU cooler
Cooler Master HAF 912 Case

The case has an exhaust fan in the back and an intake at the bottom in the front. It has a spot for a small one on the side and a giant fan on the top.

1) Should I get any additional fans?
2) How do I overclock my CPU? I don't need to be aggressive, but I would like to get somewhere in the 4.2 range if I can do so comfortably.
3) Does it matter which side of the case the CPU fan is on? Obviously the massive heatsink is there, but I could put the fan on the right above the RAM or on the left near the exhaust fan. I'm not even sure which direction the fan blows. I would assume away from the CPU heatsink but obviously I could be wrong. If it blows away it is blowing straight out the exhaust in the back which I think would be a good thing.
4) My cable management is non-existent. I blame the bottom mounted PSU with an 8 pin cable that would barely reach the top of the case.
5) Did I miss anything?

More about : idea overclock 3570k

a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 14, 2012 4:14:14 AM

Cable management is a thing that can aid in the air fow inside the case , even though it's only wires they can still interfere with the air flow.
Additional fans are always a good thing and if you can add any it would be helpful. An even number of fans blowing in and out to have a balanced air flow is a good idea.
If you haven't yet then you need to become familliar with the way things work in the bios. In overclocking the cpu you will be spending a good amount of time there to complete the process.
To overclock the cpu you have to change the cpu multiplier and that is located in the bios. A good motherboard is also a necessary part of the process because it needs to have a good power management system so that the cpu will be properly supplied with voltage. The Asrock board that you have is average in that depertment and I would not expect that you should overclock past your target of 4.2 ghz.
Overclocking the cpu is a tedious time consuming process and it requires a lot of time and patience. It also requires a good cpu cooler that has been properly installed to take care of the heat that will be put out by the cpu with overclocking.
There are some stickys tha are at the top of this section of the forum and there are other places that would have information about overclocking and it would be a good idea to read up as much info as you can to be aware of all the aspects of doing an overclock.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/259903-29-overclockin...

A basic short version of an overclock is this , you would go into the bios and take the cpu mulitlier and raise it up a notch and save and exit and go into Windows and verify that Windows is stable with programs opening and games can be played. Then you go back into the bios and raise the multiplier another notch and repeat the same process , this is the tedious part the going back and forth between Windows and the bios. You raise the multiplier and you verify Windows is stable.
When you get up to 3.9 ghz or 4.0 ghz you want to spend more time with the verification process in Windows and run a program like Prime 95 for about an hour or Future Mark with thier Pc Mark program to get more of a stress on the cpu and see what the temps are.
As you go along with this process you should kep a log of all the steps and record the voltages even though you are not touching the voltage setting you can still record what the bios is doing with it, and record all the temps at each stage with the matching frequncies.
Once you get to your target you want to do several hours of stress testing and record the temps and the voltage along with the multiplier. After your finished you should save the overclock in the bios as a profile so that if there was a change in the bios and it reset for some reason you could just reload the overclock profile instead of going through the process all over.
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August 14, 2012 12:32:55 PM

inzone said:
Cable management is a thing that can aid in the air fow inside the case , even though it's only wires they can still interfere with the air flow.
Additional fans are always a good thing and if you can add any it would be helpful. An even number of fans blowing in and out to have a balanced air flow is a good idea.
If you haven't yet then you need to become familliar with the way things work in the bios. In overclocking the cpu you will be spending a good amount of time there to complete the process.
To overclock the cpu you have to change the cpu multiplier and that is located in the bios. A good motherboard is also a necessary part of the process because it needs to have a good power management system so that the cpu will be properly supplied with voltage. The Asrock board that you have is average in that depertment and I would not expect that you should overclock past your target of 4.2 ghz.
Overclocking the cpu is a tedious time consuming process and it requires a lot of time and patience. It also requires a good cpu cooler that has been properly installed to take care of the heat that will be put out by the cpu with overclocking.
There are some stickys tha are at the top of this section of the forum and there are other places that would have information about overclocking and it would be a good idea to read up as much info as you can to be aware of all the aspects of doing an overclock.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/259903-29-overclockin...

A basic short version of an overclock is this , you would go into the bios and take the cpu mulitlier and raise it up a notch and save and exit and go into Windows and verify that Windows is stable with programs opening and games can be played. Then you go back into the bios and raise the multiplier another notch and repeat the same process , this is the tedious part the going back and forth between Windows and the bios. You raise the multiplier and you verify Windows is stable.
When you get up to 3.9 ghz or 4.0 ghz you want to spend more time with the verification process in Windows and run a program like Prime 95 for about an hour or Future Mark with thier Pc Mark program to get more of a stress on the cpu and see what the temps are.
As you go along with this process you should kep a log of all the steps and record the voltages even though you are not touching the voltage setting you can still record what the bios is doing with it, and record all the temps at each stage with the matching frequncies.
Once you get to your target you want to do several hours of stress testing and record the temps and the voltage along with the multiplier. After your finished you should save the overclock in the bios as a profile so that if there was a change in the bios and it reset for some reason you could just reload the overclock profile instead of going through the process all over.


Thanks. I'll have to read up and learn about the BIOS stuff. I wanted to do cable management. I was all set to run things a certain way and then my bottom mounted non-modular power supply hurt me in that area significantly. The SATA power cables with 3 connectors on it do not want to connect nicely since they're upside down from how they should be. The 8 pin motherboard connection barely reaches the motherboard area it needs to connect to and I basically have to run it straight over my video card and snake it around my CPU cooler.

Thankfully my CPU cooler is properly installed and it is blowing air directly out the back out at an exhaust fan.

When I look at temperatures at what point do I say that's hotter than I want it to be?
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Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2012 1:02:18 PM

I just bought that exact same motherboard to replace my dying Extreme 4 P67 board. Very easy to overclock. Set multiplier to 44, set offset voltage to -0.05 and stress test. Add 0n 0.05 if unstable and repeat til stable

CPU PLL voltage - 1.75
Short & long term power limits to 220w
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2012 5:50:17 PM

^ +1. That's even more than I did tho. I just set the multiplier to 44 and saved. I went back to 3.9 because I'm miserly...
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2012 5:57:02 PM

Well, that $0.10 a month can add up over a 100 years :) 
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August 14, 2012 7:26:16 PM

ncasolo said:
I wanted to do cable management. I was all set to run things a certain way and then my bottom mounted non-modular power supply hurt me in that area significantly. The SATA power cables with 3 connectors on it do not want to connect nicely since they're upside down from how they should be. The 8 pin motherboard connection barely reaches the motherboard area it needs to connect to and I basically have to run it straight over my video card and snake it around my CPU cooler.




If you live near a store that sells computer components you can find cable extensions for every connection on a power supply and they're cheap. Otherwise look online.
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a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 14, 2012 8:45:46 PM

If you are serious about cable management then you can get extensions for any cables that are too short for where you want to run them. This is a 8 pin cpu power exstention that would certianly help and it's 16" , they also have 24".

http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_p...
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August 14, 2012 9:19:16 PM

inzone said:
If you are serious about cable management then you can get extensions for any cables that are too short for where you want to run them. This is a 8 pin cpu power exstention that would certianly help and it's 16" , they also have 24".

http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_p...


Wonder if Amazon has the stuff. I get free 2 day shipping from Amazon so they're my first choice. I'll have to take a look. most of the cables are at the bottom of the case out of the way of everything that needs air circulation. It just doesn't look clean like I would like it to.
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August 21, 2012 9:54:10 PM

How do I stress test for stability? I've had a BSOD twice now when trying to configure. My first offset voltage was -1.05 and now it is -1.10. I tried fixed mode with IGPU Voltage at 1.250 and it BSOD'd.

For that matter how do I tell what it is running at? I mean I set the multiplier but I have no way to tell if it is overclocked.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 21, 2012 9:56:13 PM

Your offset is WAY too low. It's in the high negatives. Try setting the multiplier to 42 or 43, then setting the offset to -0.005, just a hair below zero
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August 21, 2012 9:58:34 PM

bearclaw99 said:
Your offset is WAY too low. It's in the high negatives. Try setting the multiplier to 42 or 43, then setting the offset to -0.005, just a hair below zero


Oh. I thought you were saying to start at the default and go 0.05 further negative. Ok. Yeah my multiplier is 42. That's where i started.

Any idea how I can stress test?
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August 21, 2012 10:14:14 PM

For the sake of reminding everyone I'm a novice... how can I check temperatures from in the OS while Prime95 runs?
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August 22, 2012 1:10:51 AM

Quote:
just follow my settings and then if need to tweak settings further, it's no problem..


Followed those and the 1.250 fixed voltage resulted in BSOD. I believe I have a stable clock now. What's even more awesome is I think my CPU temps are in the low 40s. I spent about 45 minutes gaming and then rebooted and looked in the UEFI hardware monitor and it was at 41C. I know it could have cooled a little after I exited the game, but still seems to be performing well.
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a c 218 à CPUs
a c 138 K Overclocking
August 22, 2012 5:41:38 PM

A good cpu intensive game can be used as a stress test but in the absencse of that you can download Prime 95 for free and it will give your cpu a good stressdtest. Futuremark is another place to get software to test and thier Pcmark is a good one. They will try to get you to purchase the upgrade but you can use the free one to run a test.
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August 22, 2012 10:13:06 PM

Quote:
need to see what those temps are during gaming....



Any idea how?
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August 24, 2012 1:59:59 AM

Here is an image of my current temps after a solid hour of gaming on the only game I'm likely to play on this PC. The not so funny thing is all 3 fans are exhausting air right now. I need to get a case fan for the side that I can plug in to an available power source. The blade one has 4 pins and the only 4 pin slot on my motherboard is my CPU fan. The HDD fan on the front is supposed to be an intake. I accidentally installed it backwards. I'm guessing the improved air flow will help my temps a little. The LAST question I have is... are my temps in a comfortable range or should they be cooler? If they're in a comfortable range how much hotter should I be comfortable with if I decide I want a little more performance?

Thanks to everyone who helped me in this thread.



http://tinypic.com/r/2vkyie0/6
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August 24, 2012 8:21:42 PM

Quote:
nice..
but temps actually DURING gaming.


I'm assuming the "max" value represents the temps during gaming. Before i started gaming the "max" value was around 30C. I would say it is safe to say those max temps were sustained during the gaming session. However if logging the temps over a period of time is what we need to see how things are going I can figure out how to do that.
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