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WD 15 EARS Jumpers 7&8 and Win 7

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January 1, 2012 5:36:08 AM

Hello, I have upgraded to win 7 64-bit from xp. With xp I had my WD 15 EARS Green drive set-up with the jumpers set to 7 and 8. With win 7 the drive is performing painfully slowly, and I have read that this may be due to the jumper being on 7&8--a setting that is recommended only for XP. So I removed the jumper and rebooted to find that the boot manager is not found. So obviously this has messed with the partition because when I try a repair from the installation disk, no OS is seen. Will it be possible to repair the boot record so that I can run the system with the jumper removed, or does this require a much dreaded formatting and a reinstall? I currently have 2 partitions on the drive, if I have to reformat and reinstall, will I need to do so for both, or only the partition with the OS? Cheers.

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a c 415 G Storage
January 1, 2012 6:33:39 AM

Those jumpers control the alignment of the sectors on the drive, and if you change them (put the jumper block on or take it off) then all of the sectors effectively move by 1 logical block number. That will scramble the file systems in all of the partitions on the drive, so you'd want to back up all the data in them before switching the jumpers, then change the jumper, and then restore all the data (or in the case of the OS partition, reinstall Windows).

If you originally partitioned the drive under XP and you had the jumpers set for the correct alignment for XP, then the drive should continue to perform well for Windows 7 and you should leave the jumpers alone. Removing the jumpers and repartitioning under Windows 7 and then restoring the data shouldn't make any significant performance difference.
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January 1, 2012 6:54:42 PM

sminlal said:
Those jumpers control the alignment of the sectors on the drive, and if you change them (put the jumper block on or take it off) then all of the sectors effectively move by 1 logical block number. That will scramble the file systems in all of the partitions on the drive, so you'd want to back up all the data in them before switching the jumpers, then change the jumper, and then restore all the data (or in the case of the OS partition, reinstall Windows).

If you originally partitioned the drive under XP and you had the jumpers set for the correct alignment for XP, then the drive should continue to perform well for Windows 7 and you should leave the jumpers alone. Removing the jumpers and repartitioning under Windows 7 and then restoring the data shouldn't make any significant performance difference.



Thanks Sminlal. The partitions were created under Win 7 64-bit, and I have definitely noticed a decline in HDD performance since installing it. Several scans of the drive have not turned up any problems, so I thought it could be the jumpers.
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a c 415 G Storage
January 2, 2012 1:16:02 AM

Yes, if you had the jumpers set for XP and then created the partitions under Windows 7, that would definitely cause the problem. So you'll need to go back to square one, reset the jumpers, and start again.

The key to working with those jumpers is: set them for the system you partition the drive on. Where you RUN the drive is irrelevant - it's where you perform the partitioning that counts.
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January 2, 2012 6:12:10 PM

Best answer selected by nm7512.
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January 2, 2012 6:12:19 PM

Imaged the the drive, removed jumper, then formatted and restored image. Noticeably quicker HDD. Thanks.
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