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Timings !!!

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August 7, 2010 4:55:29 AM

Hello everyone.... :) 

My Ram timings R 6-6-6-18 :heink: 

So what does that mean?

R the good?

any help will be appreciated, thanks in advanced....... :D 

More about : timings

a c 150 } Memory
August 7, 2010 5:17:08 AM

Depends on what the RAM is. If it's DDR2 800 then no those are pretty high timings. If it's DDR3 1600 then those are pretty amazing.
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a b } Memory
August 7, 2010 5:33:48 AM

The series of four numbers for the RAM timings are specified in this order:

CL (CAS latency)
tRCD (Row Address to Column Address Delay)
tRP (Row Precharge Time)
tRAS (Row Active Time)

The numbers by themselves don't mean anything unless you specify the the module type ( DDR2 or DDR3 ), the RAM module's maximum operating clock speed, and the recommended operating voltage.
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August 7, 2010 5:53:19 AM

it's a transcend 2GB DDR 2 800 MHz......PC2 6400
voltage 1.800 V (by piriform speccy)
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a b } Memory
August 7, 2010 6:06:32 AM

CL 6-6-6-18 for DDR2-800 PC2 6400 memory is nothing special or even close to high performance.

If it was CL 4-4-4-12 DDR2-800 PC2 6400 then we're talkin'.
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a c 150 } Memory
August 7, 2010 6:10:32 AM

My Corsair DDR2 800 is 4-4-4-12 at 2.1v. The 6-6-6-18 timings are even higher than the standard for 1.8v DDR2 800 5-5-5-15.
Basically those are low quality memory modules or you have them clocked wrong.
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August 7, 2010 6:13:06 AM

naa i don't manually clocked them, where i live i get only this module.... so i can't help this situation... so acc to u these r bad timings.... how much performance loss???

so less the timings = high the performance?????

here is my module, the last one is mine.......

http://www.transcendusa.com/Products/MemList.asp?axn=go...
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Best solution

a c 150 } Memory
August 7, 2010 6:20:46 AM

Yes lower is faster. The numbers are the time in milliseconds to perform the operations listed . As to how much ........probably very little. You would maybe notice on a benchmark test but not in real world situations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAS_latency
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a b } Memory
August 7, 2010 6:22:16 AM

Do you have one memory module or two?

If you have two modules are you running them in single channel or dual channel mode?
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a c 150 } Memory
August 7, 2010 6:22:35 AM

You could try overclocking it. Raise the voltage to 1.9/2.0/2.1 and manually set the timings. Then test for stability.
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August 7, 2010 6:24:47 AM

ko888 said:
Do you have one memory module or two?

If you have two modules are you running them in single channel or dual channel mode?

i have single module... i give the link above in that last one is mine....... :) 
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August 7, 2010 6:25:30 AM

i never overclock anything, cause i don't know.... and don't want to take any risk....
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a b } Memory
August 7, 2010 5:49:49 PM

The difference from 6's to 4's amounts to about a 4% - 5% increase in memory i/o. System level (as opposed to just memory) benchmarks will barely change.
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January 14, 2013 8:57:19 PM

Best answer selected by rohn_avni.
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