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Gaming and Home Theatre - Advice for a FINAL CHECK!

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January 13, 2010 12:35:30 AM

Hi all!

I just wanted to make sure I didn't make any incompatibility errors in my choices for my new home-build. Thanks for all your advice, and please give your criticism freely!


APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: In the next few days!
BUDGET RANGE: Around $1000
SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Gaming and home theatre
PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Monitor, speakers, keyboard, mouse
PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: newegg.com
OVERCLOCKING: Yes
SLI OR CROSSFIRE: Maybe in the future


The build:

CPU: AMD Phenom II 955 BE
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-790XTA-UD4
RAM: OCZ Platinum 4gb DDR3 1333
GPU: HIS H577FM1GD Radeon HD 5770 1GB
PSU: CORSAIR CMPSU-650TX
Case: Antec 900
HDD: WD Caviar Black 640GB



Questions for the gurus:

- Will the Arctic Freezer 64 Pro fit into my AM3 MOBO?
- Is the 650TX enough for me if I decide to set up dual GPUs in the future?
- Should I worry about purchasing extra cables to put my build together?
- Any build suggestions?? All are appreciated! Thanks!
January 13, 2010 1:50:38 AM

Also, as a first time builder, do the parts come with tools, or should I plan on purchasing some?

thanks for all your help!
January 13, 2010 1:54:57 AM

Atomic PC forums are showing CF 5770s as 200W (for the cards) So I would say as long as the total system remains conservative a 650TX should last a good long time.
http://forums.atomicmpc.com.au/index.php?showtopic=264

The AC Freezer pro 64 is probably a good fit but not the best cooler.
http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm

Most of the better coolers do block the first two RAM slots on AMD boards, but there is no performance hit using the secondary slots.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Related resources
January 13, 2010 1:56:52 AM

There is a great updated guide for building located at the top of the forum.

You won't need any special tools beyond a Phillips screwdriver and maybe some pliers.
January 13, 2010 2:11:26 AM

wow
thanks so much for the quick reply Proximon

i will take a closer look @ the Sunbeam CR-CCTF and see if it is a better investment. have you had any personal experiences with either heatsinks?
January 13, 2010 2:19:50 AM

Only Anecdotal experience from this forum... the Sunbeam can have installation issues when used with tall heatsinks that might block finger access to the spring clips. I don't think this board has very tall heatsinks.

It's a value choice for sure, and has been recommended here for well over a year now. I've just had the one negative feedback because of the installation issue. Pretty sure your board will allow you enough room, based on the pics.
January 13, 2010 11:05:36 AM

If the CCTF blocks the primary RAM slots, when I upgrade, should I opt for 4gbx2 or get a new heatsink and get 2gbx4?

thanks again for the help!
January 13, 2010 9:41:41 PM

For your usage, I don't see needing more than 4GB in the next few years. We have been capped there for a while now and I see no trend for games to use more.

There are a few, higher, coolers that do a great job and leave room for lower sticks of RAM. They just cost more. There are also of course other solutions such as Corsairs little water kit.

Have a look at this pic:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

That would be a Zerotherm Zen, a decent choice.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

January 13, 2010 10:23:11 PM

hmm... okay. thanks

what's your opinion on the price/performance of the 790XTA-U4P? it's a little expensive for a 790X and SB750... i just dunno if the future proofing with USB3.0 and the new SATA is worth it.

would i be better off saving money and getting a 790GX?
January 13, 2010 10:27:01 PM

Depends on how long you expect the lifetime of this build to be.

If you plan on keeping this computer for 4-6 years with some minor upgrades and then building an entirely new computer, go for future-proofing.

If you plan on building an entirely new computer in 2-3 years (maybe reusing DVD drive, PSU, etc.), then don't worry about future-proofing.
January 13, 2010 10:37:07 PM

Good advice.
January 13, 2010 10:54:11 PM

ok thanks for the advice guys!
!